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> Todd's Video Chat Lesson Notes
Todd Simpson
post Apr 6 2010, 10:13 PM
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VIDEO CHAT LESSONS


Here are the lesson notes and Tablature for the SATURDAY VIDEO CHAT LESSON SERIES here on GMC. Please join us every saturday :5:00 PM E.S.T, 10 PM C.E.S.T for a new lesson.

Please feel free to record yourself playing these lessons and put them up on youtube and embed them in a reply to this thread so I can see your progress and offer anything that might help you on your way.

One thing I should mention is the importance of PRACTICE. The more you practice, the better you will get. The less you practice, the less progress you will make. Practice and persistence is the main difference between folks that want to play well and folks that actually can play well. There is no real "secret" and no special "Talent" is required, just daily practice for about an hour each time if possible.

Before playing, always try to do some gentle stretches with your hands and wrists. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the bane of any musician. Avoid it by stretching lightly before and after playing. Also, do the usual things to help maintain yourself like getting enough sleep, and not over doing it when going out when friends. Learning an instrument can be made much easier by taking care of yourself so that your mind is clear and focused when you sit down to practice and learn. Here we go smile.gif

LESSON #1 - Getting Started With Alternate Picking
What is "Alternate Picking"? I'm sure you have heard the term thrown about as meaning a variety of things. For our purposes, alternate picking is simply
alternating between up and down strokes. You may have also heard of "Economic Picking", this is something else. Economic picking has more to do with combining up and/or downstrokes in groups of more than one in order to maximize efficiency of picking in the context of playing a given pattern.

Introduction to the Pick / Pick Choice
Before we get to far in to alternate picking, lets talk about the pick. I'd suggest you get a thick pick that doesn't bend. Maybe 1.0 MM or thicker and then sharpen it to a bit of a point using sand paper. Don't make a weapon, just sharpen it up a bit. Even if you don't use this for your regular playing, it will help during these lessons. I use CLAYTON 1.2mm picks. I'm currently endorsed by Clayton but I was using their picks loooong before that.

It's important to use a pointed pick when practicing Alternate Picking. DUNLOP has some new picks (Dunlop Sharp's)that are well suited for practicing your "Alternate Picking". I just found these in my local guitar shop and I hadn't seem them before so hopefully they are widely available. Notice the shape of these picks.

Tear drop shape with a long, sharp, point. This is the shape that I've been creating by shaving/carving/sanding standard picks for years. Creating this fine point really helps to decrease the amount of "Pick Drag" and reduce the amount of pick striking the string at any given time. This will help you essentially play in a more accurate, consistent fashion and with increased speed.

This shape is becoming more and more popular as evidenced by it's adoption from a large distributor like DUNLOP where as for quite some time, these large picks in this shape were seen more from boutique vendors like V-Picks.

(Here is a link to the Dunlop site or more info on the "Sharp" picks)
http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/tortex-sharp

See the picture below. I've included a V-Pick Switchblade for reference on the left.
Attached Image

Check out these new dunlop picks. Get the thickest one you can find as thickness reduces flex and flex is your enemy when you are practicing your AP. Especially at first. These are "Tortex" picks, so they will have a pinch more "Flex" than the V-Pick Switchblade. But if you like Dunlop picks, these may be the pick for you.

If you don't like Tortex Picks, try the V-Picks I mentioned earlier. They have Zero Flex and are very stable. You can get a 3.0 MM "Trainer" pick called the DIMENSION that is pre sharpened, is hard to dull and will help train your hand to glance the string when Alternate Picking. V-Picks are Boutique/Custom picks and they are not cheap. But they are well worth it.

Here is a picture of the DIMENSION from V-Pick
Attached Image

Here is a link to the VPICK web site with more info.
http://www.v-picks.com/picks.php

Even if you use these picks just for training, and switch back to your typical pick for regular play, I think it would be well worth it. You should see gains after just a short few hours of practice.

Angles of Attack
Once you have decided on a pick, it’s time to attack the strings. First, grip your pick between the thumb and first finger with the tip of the pick pointing away from your thumb at a 90 degree angle.


Once you get comfy holding the pick, remember that you should pick from the wrist, not from the elbow or the shoulder. Also, use as little motion as possible. Exaggerating the pick stroke will actually slow you down a bit.

When deciding on initiating with an up or down stroke, take the rest of your intended strokes in to account and plan accordingly. You can start with either up or down stroke depending on what feels best to youl. There is no one “right” way, as such. Instead, trust your instincts as a player. If you don’t feel you have any “instincts”, this is the time to work on developing some.



Working With a Metronome

Working with a Metronome is CRUCIAL to your progress. Here is a great lesson from Kris Dahl who is an AMAZING player and a testament to the Power of Practice! Here is the link
http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/how-to-use-a-metronome/

PRACTICE TIME ( At Least - 30 Minutes Per Day)

Select a string, say the "E" string and begin to pick up and down in an alternating pattern. See how fast you can go before it gets uncontrollable and uncomfortable and reduce the BPM. Then get used to the feeling of alternate picking by playing for several minutes at a stretch along with the metronome.

Once you get comfortable with alternate picking, start moving up the neck. Start at the first fret, alternate pick four strokes, then move up one fret, repeat, move up, etc. Here is the tablature.



Here is a short video to let you hear how it will sound and what it will look like when played at speed.


Repeat this workout several times this week during your practice time. Remember, if it feels too loose or sloppy or out of control, you are trying to go to fast! Slow the metronome down just a bit and find the "zone" and work up from there.

LESSON #2 - Adding Left Hand Complexity

Let's start working our left hand in to things a bit more. We are going to take our lesson one workout and make it a bit harder on our left hand by reducing the number of pick strokes per note. So take a look at the tablature and watch the video and give this a shot. At this point, we are still focused on picking technique so make sure every stroke is alternating and that you have good hand position and that you are holding the pick properly. Building good habits early on is crucial. Re-training yourself once you have bad habbits in place is twice as hard. Here is the tablature.



Here is the Video lesson. It contains other details and examples of playing at different speeds with a metronome.

Keep an eye on your BPM on your metronome. You may have to slow down a bit from where you were in the last lesson as we have now added complexity. Once you get used to it you will be able to speed back up. Seek that same "sweet spot" where you can tell you are having to work, but can still keep it very even and on beat.

PRACTICE TIME ( At Least - 30 Minutes Per Day)

*Try to push the BPM up bit by bit and repeat the workout on all strings for this session and for each practice session this week. By the end of the week, your right and left hands should be well on their way to talking to each other and picking and fretting at the exact same time. Always try to play as cleanly as possible and keep control over your picking and fretting. Don't play so fast it gets sloppy. Take it slowly and let your hands learn at their own pace.


LESSON #3 - Changing Strings


Lets now add a bit of complexity in and start on a higher string and then go to a lower string. This may feel like playing backwards at first, but it's just a descending patter. This pattern is a great way to work up your right hand, left hand synchronization which is the KEY to alternate picking. start out playing this slow and work your way up. Palm mute it if possible. It will make the notes more distinct and it sounds cool. smile.gif




PRACTICE TIME ( At Least - 30 Minutes Per Day)

*Start slow on the metronome and work your way up. Play as slow as you need to in order to hit every single note. Bump the speed on the metronome up per usual til you hit your "stick point" and then practice through it. You will be shocked how quickly you advance. It's O.K. to feel some tension in your forearm as you will be building up your endurance with this lesson. However, do not play until your arm or hand goes numb or burns.


LESSON #4 - Right/Left Hand Synchronization


In this lesson, we are going to add a more complicated pattern/shape in to the mix. This pattern will force your hands to synch up. At this point, you may be noticing that your left hand is having trouble keeping up with your right hand. Or, you may notice the exact opposite, your right hand is having trouble keeping up with your left. This is quite natural. The hands sometimes develop at different rates. Our goal is to get them both playing the same thing at the same time at the same speed no matter what that speed is.

Because we are adding complexity again, you may notice that you have to turn the metronome down a bit. That's perfectly fine. Go as slow as you need to in order to play the pattern as cleanly as possible. Try to palm mute if possible to reduce the amount of ring after each strike as you want to keep the notes as separate as possible.




PRACTICE TIME ( At Least - 30 Minutes Per Day)

*Once you get the pattern down at a comfortable speed, start moving the pattern up the neck one fret at a time. You can play it four times then go up one fret, or two times and go up a fret, or even once and then go up a fret. Go all the way to the 12th fret. Practice this for at least 30 minutes out of each practice sesssion this week and see how fast you can get the pattern and still keep it clean. This will really work your left hand and left forearm as well. It's O.K. to feel some tension in your forearm as you will be building up your endurance with this lesson. However, do not play until your arm or hand goes numb or burns.


LESSON #5 - Back and Forth


In this next lesson, we are going to add some more complexity to our patterns. We are going to partially re-descend in a shape after we have started ascending. This will create a shape that may take some getting used to, but it is a very valuable skill to have. Being able to stop short in a scale pattern and reverse directions at will without losing speed or pick/string contact takes some practice but is quite possible even at high BPM.

In this lesson we will use a pattern very similar to what we have already covered so as to take advantage of the muscle memory you have built via practice so far. We are going to introduce a quick reversing pattern in the middle so as to help keep your brain flexible as well as your muscle memory. Your brain and your hands need to learn that any pattern/shape can change at any time and your fingers may need to hit any given note within a planned scale or lick.

Take a look at the Tablature below and see if you can memorize the pattern and start running it slowly.


Here is the video for this lesson. Once you have the pattern down, play along with the video and start working up your speed.




LESSON #6 - Pedal Point/Tone


In this lesson, we are going to use something called a "Pedal Point" or "Pedal Tone". This is basically using one note as the base in a shape or scale and coming back to it again and again. Before we get to far ahead of ourselves, read the following. It's an explanation of "Pedal Point" from Wikipedia Source: Pedal Point on Wikipedia.

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In tonal music, a pedal point (also pedal tone, pedal note, organ point, or pedal) is a sustained tone, typically in the bass, during which at least one foreign, i.e., dissonant harmony is sounded in the other parts. A pedal point is a "non-chord tone", which puts it in the same musical categories as suspensions, retardations, and passing tones. However, the pedal point is unique among non-chord tones "in that begins on a consonance, sustains (or repeats) through another chord as a dissonance until the harmony" not the non-chord tone, "resolves back to a consonance."

Pedal points "have a strong tonal effect, 'pulling' the harmony back to its root." When a pedal point occurs in a voice other than the bass, it is usually referred to as an inverted pedal point[2] (see inversion (music)). Pedal points are usually on either the tonic or the dominant (fifth note of the scale) tones. The pedal tone is considered a chord tone in the original harmony, then a nonchord tone during the intervening dissonant harmonies, and then a chord tone again when the harmony resolves. A dissonant pedal point may go against all harmonies present during its duration, being almost more like an added tone than a nonchord tone, or pedal points may serve as atonal pitch centers.

The term comes from the organ for its ability to sustain a note indefinitely and the tendency for such notes to be played on an organ's pedal keyboard. The pedal keyboard on an organ is played by the feet; as such, the organist can hold down a pedal point for lengthy periods while both hands perform higher-register music on the manual keyboards.

Rock guitarists have used pedal points in their solos, especially neoclassical guitarists such as Yngwie Malmsteen. Other rock guitarists that use pedal points in solos are Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Eric Johnson, John Petrucci, Jason Becker, Paul Gilbert, John Sykes and Vinnie Moore. Pedal points can be heard on records such as Vinnie Moore's "Time Odyssey" and "Mind's Eye"'; Yngwie Malmsteen's "Rising Force"; Jason Becker's "Perpetual Burn"; and Richie Kotzen's "Fever Dream". Thrash metal in particular makes abundant use a muted low E string (or lower, if other tunings are used) as a pedal point. Examples of thrash metal bands that make use of a muted low E string pedal point include: Slayer, Metallica, Megadeth and Anthrax. In small combo jazz or jazz fusion groups, the double bass player or Hammond organist may also introduce a pedal point (usually on the tonic or the dominant) in a tune that does not explicitly request a pedal point, to add tension and interest.
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We are going to keep our Pedal Tone fretted and move our other fingers to different frets. All the while, we will be alternate picking. The shape we are going to work with is part of the Natural Minor Scale and can be played in any key. Again, make sure to start off very slowly until you get the pattern down and can alternate your pick strokes consistently. This will take some focus and effort at first. As you progress it will get more and more easy and you will be able to play the pattern with ever increasing speed. This technique is a great way to work on alternate picking while working on your finger stretch at the same time. Be sure to warm up your fingers and hands before this and every practice session. Do some range of motion movements, wrist rolls, gentle finger stretches, etc. before you start your metronome.

Let't take a look at the tablature.



PRACTICE TIME ( At Least - 30 Minutes Per Day)

Here is a Video for this lesson with explanations and play along section with Metronome.

NEW VIDEO FOR LESSON #6 PEDAL POINT



*NOTE: For this lesson, set your Metronome to 8/4 time if possible.

*Grab your metronome and start finding your stick point. The point at where you lose the ability to play the pattern cleanly and it starts to sound like and feel lose. Do that same thing as before and find the sweet spot where it's hard but possible to play the pattern at speed and then do that for several sets of several minutes at a stretch. Allow yourself about half an hour to play the pattern, bump up the metronome, repeat.


LESSON #7 - Back and Forth Revisted from lower to higher strings


In this lesson will do another "back and forth" workout. We are going to start on a lower string and move to a higher one instead of the other way around as in the first part of the "back and forth" lesson.

In this workout as with the others, we are focusing on strict "Alternate Picking". I"m starting with a down stroke and alternating strokes after that. Also, instead of moving up from lower frets to higher frets, we are going to reverse this. So start this on the 12th fret and work your way down to the third fret.

What we are trying to do here is balance out your muscle memory a bit. Up until now we have been doing ascending patterns, (starting at a lower fret and moving up) so now we are adding this workout as a descending pattern (starting at a higher fret and moving to a lower one). Ideally, you should be able to play ascending or descending patterns, shapes, scales, etc. with equal precision, speed, and eventually, ease. Here is the tablature



Here is a Video Demonstration of what we are working on.



PRACTICE TIME ( At Least - 30 Minutes Per Day)
*NOTE: Again for this lesson, set your Metronome to 8/4 time if possible.

*Grab your metronome and start finding your stick point as we usually do. This workout moves from higher frets to lower frets so give yourself some time to get used to working a descending pattern. By now your muscle memory should be coming along nicely and you should notice real gains in precision and speed in your playing.


LESSON #8 - Different shapes on different strings


In Lesson 8 we are going to use a piece of the minor scale to work more on our alternate picking. We have been using the same scale shapes across strings but now we are going to use different scale shapes on each string. Our workout here will be using the last six notes of the Minor scale. Those familiar with the minor scale will recognize the pattern.

We are also going to add our "back and forth" technique in to the progression to help further enhance the muscle memory associated with traversing strings for ascending and descending patterns.

In our last lesson we went from higher frets to lower frets and we are going to reverse that. We will start on the fifth fret and work out way up to the 12th. This will be a rather complicated shape at first but with a bit of practice you will be able to play it precisely and at any speed you like. We are going to continue to work with our metronome here as well. Let's start off at 160 BPM using whole notes. Here is the tablature.

Attached File  8guitarprofile.zip ( 13.08K ) Number of downloads: 293

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PRACTICE TIME ( At Least - 30 Minutes Per Day)
*NOTE: Again for this lesson, set your Metronome to 8/4 time if possible.


LESSON #9 - Building Speed


In this lesson we are going to work on building up our speed. Pure, blinding, blistering speed. We are going to start on a higher string and move to a lower string to help force our hand to alternate pick. If we start on a low string and move to a high string, sometimes the hand wants to "economic pick" or combine strokes such as down strokes. This can be very natural and efficient but it's not our focus yet. So, on to the speed!

We are going to use a familiar shape and do a very, very simple pattern. This is based on lesson #3 actually, we are going to take that shape and reverse it. Again, our focus is speed and precision. Here is the tablature.



WARNING: DO NOT PLAY TO THE POINT OF PAIN YOU WILL HURT YOURSELF PERMANENTLY AND RISK CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME.

*It's natural to feel some tension in your arms. NOT PAIN. Always stretch before and after playing and even get an ice cube and ice down your forearm for a 2-3 minutes (not longer) to reduce swelling after an intense practice session. The last thing you want is to injure yourself.

PRACTICE TIME ( At Least - 30 Minutes Per Day)
*NOTE: Set your Metronome to 4/4 time.

Play the pattern once per position then move up one fret all the way to the 12th fret. Then play twice per position, then four times per position and move up one fret at a time to the 12th fret. This will work up your endurance. Keep pushing the metronome up. You will reach 240 BPM. At which point you will need to back the metronome down and start using half notes and then quarter notes and start marching the metronome back up. Once you can Quarter Notes at 240 BPM all the way up to the 12th fret, CONGRATULATIONS! You are well on your way.


LESSON #10 - Incorporating Inversions


We are going to add something called "Scale Inversions" in to our chops. Inversions are simply ways of playing scales that involve moving around in a consistent way within a given scale. We are going to combine two types of inversions for this particular lesson. We are not going to get too far in to the theory behind these as the application is more important for our purpose here. Take a look at the talblature and see if you can memorize the pattern. Get it to the point where you can play it as a looping pattern in a consistent way with a metronome at a steady comfortable pace.



PRACTICE TIME ( At Least - 30 Minutes Per Day)
*NOTE: Set your Metronome to 4/4 time.

*Try to palm mute as you play to give yourself practice palm muting while playing across strings and help isolate notes. Play the pattern twice and move up one fret. As usual take it to the 12th fret to get used to playing all over the neck. Push the tempo to your stick point and beyond.
*Now that you have it down, pick each note twice and start the shape on the D string and again go all the way to the 12th fret. This will work your hand further and help your synchronization.



LESSON #11 - Inverting Inversions


This is going to be a bit of a tongue twister for your fingers. This one is less about speed than about precision. We are going to work it up to brisk pace though just for fun. We are going to use two types of scale inversions and walk this pattern up the neck. Make sure to warm up and stretch your wrists/arms before hand or you may experience discomfort in your arms and hands. This pattern is a bit intense at speed. Here is the tablature.



PRACTICE TIME ( At Least - 30 Minutes Per Day)
*NOTE: Set your Metronome to 4/4 time.



LESSON #12 - Sliding


We are going to add the "slide" in to our work here. This lesson will focus on playing scales but doing so on one string at a time and sliding between positions. This will give you a chance to work on your alternate picking in the context of an actual scale and introduce you to sliding up and down the neck to reach a given note. We are going to start working in the Minor Scale.
Check out the tablature. Keep in mind this same pattern will work on every string.



Here is a vide preview of how the lesson will sound when played at speed.



LESSON #13 - Using Full Scales and Inversions


Prepare yourself, as we are about to tackle our most challenging lesson yet. We are going to combine two types of inversions and apply them to the A Minor Scale. We are going to play the scale in a somewhat non-standard fingering that will allow greater efficiency of finger movement and prep for lessons down the road. We are going to use two inversions here. One inversion for descending, then a different one for ascending. We have done these same inversions in lesson 10 and 11, now are going to use them in full scales. Here is the tablature for the descending first part.


Here is the link to the full size image.
FULL SIZE IMAGE OF TABLATURE

Here is the tablature for the second part using a different inversion.

Here is the link to the full size image.
FULL SIZE IMAGE OF TABLATURE


LESSON #14 - Building Speed on Open Strings


In this lesson we are going to focus on single string work again to see how fast we can build up our alternate picking speed. This lesson is based on a minor scale and is very similar to our slide based workout on one string from a previous lesson. This difference here is that we are going to go to an open string in between in each note. So in essence, this is a "Pedal Tone" or "Pedal Point" workout similar to our first Pedal Point lesson.

Try to "double pick" or pick each note twice once you have the pattern down. See if you can keep pushing the BPM on your metronome up as you go. Also, play the pattern on every string on your guitar once you are comfortable with it. So as soon as you can play the pattern, start on the high E and then play it on every string going down to the low E and pick each note twice. Once you get up to about 200 BPM and start using half notes, you are well on your way.






LESSON #15 - Introduction to "Economic Picking / Directional Picking"


In this lesson we will introduce what is called "Economic Picking / Directional Picking". Put simply, this is just using two ore more down or up strokes instead of alternate picking. The lesson will also serve as an introduction to sweeping picking in that we are using down strokes combined with hammer ons/pull offs, in a limited way which is the basis for sweep picking. Take a look at the tablature.
[attachment=21341:15.jpg]


LESSON #16 - Triad Shapes Across 3 Strings"


In this lesson we are going to explore triad shapes and add a more complicated pattern than we have previously attempted. This pattern is based on a classical guitar etude so when played, it will have a "Classical" feel to it. Speed is not the focus in this lesson, instead we are going for precision. Here is the tablature.



LESSON #17 - Using "Back and Forth" techniques in full scales"


In this lesson we are going to use our "Back and forth Technique" from previous lessons in a full scale. In this case, A Minor. This pattern can be applied to any scale once you get it down. We are going to ascend and descend the scale using the same technique so the lesson has two parts.

*Part One


*The Turn Around Portion (The tablature software limits the number of notes per chart)



*Part Two





Lesson #18 - Integrating Solo/Lead Playing"


In this lesson we are going to start working out chops that we have done so far in to playing actual guitar solos/leads. Using the backing track below, transpose as many of the licks we have done as you can in to E Minor and try to play against the backing track.

The trick is to learn how to flow in and out of each chop/lick smoothly. Keep in mind it's important to land on a "Root Note" every so often to resolve the solo. So make sure to land on an E at the end of a lick. Here is the backing track

Attached File  Lesson18.mp3 ( 3.29MB ) Number of downloads: 571




Lesson #19 - Mini Clinic (Tapping/Hammering)"


In this lesson, we are going to take a break from our alternate picking work and focus on the technique known as "Tapping/Hammering". So let's put down our pick and get ready to use our fingers.

We are going to introduce the Mixolydian scale into our work here. This is the first lesson using this scale, but it won't e the last. We are going to also integrate the "Pedal Point/Pedal Tone" idea again in the form of an open string. In this case, the Pedal Point will the the High E string.



Take a look at the high E string. Our patterns for tapping will be focused on the High E.
[attachment=21603:E_Myxolydian.jpg]

Here is a short demonstration of our main lick for this lesson.




Lesson #20 - Pentatonic Finger Torture


In this lesson we are going to work up our speed and alternate picking using a semi pentatonic warm up and and Pentatonic pattern of "threes". Here is the tablature.

[attachment=21868:22.jpg]

Warmup
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Workout
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b]
Lesson #20 - Pentatonic Finger Torture Part II/b]
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Lesson #21 - Blitzkrieg Guitar Rythms / Lead as Rythm


In this lesson we are going to add a fast lick that we worked on in a previous lesson, with a Pedal Point based guitar rythm. So we are combining two techniques from previous lesssons to create a guitar rythm of considerable speed and complexity. If you have been working up through these lessons, this is your time to shine. Here is a video preivew of what the riff sounds like.


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[attachment=21803:21_backingtrack.mp3]
Attached File  21_backingwithguitar.mp3 ( 588.49K ) Number of downloads: 426

Attached File  21_backing60bpm.mp3 ( 879.92K ) Number of downloads: 411


Backing Track 70 BPM
Attached File  70bpm.mp3 ( 755.02K ) Number of downloads: 411


Backing Track 80 BPM
Attached File  80bpm.mp3 ( 661.14K ) Number of downloads: 414


UPDATE: COLLAB! BASED ON LESSON #21!

NEW BACKING TRACK FOR COLLAB 21!
*This is just great for solo work. Let me know what you think, give it a try!
Attached File  NEW_VERSION_BACKING_TRACK.mp3 ( 1.68MB ) Number of downloads: 408


COLLAB 21 POST THREAD

Here is the Tablature to LESSON 21, now being Called "Project 21" as a Collab.
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Practice!
Todd


Lesson #22 - Extreme Legato / Shredding With One Hand


In this lesson, we are going to work on our left hand strength and speed exclusively. We are going to put the pick down for a bit, and see how far we can push our left hand.


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Lesson #23 - Extended Scale Runs


In this lesson we will take the F# Minor Scale and run it from the second fret up to the 14th fret.
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Lesson #24 - Building Left Hand Strength, Stretch and Speed



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Practice!
Todd


Lesson #25 - Combining Alternate Picking and Economic Picking


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Lesson #26 - Asymmetrical Patterns on Symmetrical Shapes (Alternate Picking/Economic Picking


In this lesson we are going to simplify the shape we are using and focus on generating speed using our "back and forth" approach. This will be a bit of a challenge in that the number of notes per string varies in this lesson. The purpose of this is to confuse your fingers a bit so that they adapt to playing asymmetrical patterns and shapes. For this lesson feel free to use either Alternate Picking and or Economic Picking depending on what feels better. The goal is to adapt to the asymmetrical nature of the picking pattern instead of focusing on AP/Economic picking. Lets take a look at the tablature.
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Lesson #27 - Symmetrical Patterns on Symmetrical Shapes (Alternate Picking/Economic Picking Cont'd

In this lesson, we continue with our Alternate Picking and Economic Picking work. This shape should be familiar as we have used it in several lessons.

And here is the tablature
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Lesson #28- Scale Patterns (Alternate Picking/Economic Picking Cont'd

This is a tough one. There are wads of notes. Most of them repeat so focus on the fingering, then the picking.


And here is the tablature.
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SIMPLIFIED VERSION FROM SATURDAY :
Here is the simplified version of the same thing. It has the same idea but fewer notes.
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Lesson #29 - Turning these lessons in to licks/chops for use in guitar solos

In this lesson we are going to take some of the longer scale runs/patterns and break them down in to licks/chops that you can use when writing guitar solos over your own music or someone else's.

*First up, let's break down Lesson #20 and create a lick that works well for all kinds of rock based solo work.
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*Next up, lets take a Pentatonic shape and and combine Alternate Picking as well as Hammer On and Pull Off techniques. This will also work well as a lick in solo work.
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Todd


Lesson #30 - Turning these lessons in to licks/chops for use in guitar solos Part II

Lets continue our work turning all these workouts we have been doing, in to chops you can use in a real guitar solo!

*First up, always do your stretches.
*Also don't forget to do your index finger/thumb snap workout to build finger strength.

Now then!

30 PART 1
*Let's introduce another new shape based also on the pentatonic scale that will use all the techniques from the previous lesson as well as give you a chance to work on your streeeeetttcchhhh. This lick will be a real challenge at first. But with practice it gets much easier.
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30 PART 2
*We are going to take part of the "Blues" scale and create a lick/chop that we can play in a solo and that we can loop to work on our speed and alternate picking. Take a look at the tablature.
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30 PART 3
*Let's add a bend in to our pentatonic work. So this lick will start with a bend and transition to a hammer on/pull of. This is a very traditional blues/rock lick but often used to great effect by Kirk Hammett among others in very heavy solos.
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Practice!
Todd


Lesson #31 - Turning these lessons in to licks/chops for use in guitar solos Part III

Today we are going to work on some licks and once we get them up to speed, we are going to play them against a backing track instead of a metronome. This will hopefully give you better insight in to how these chops work with music as opposed to just by themselves.

Part 1
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Part 2
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Part 3
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Part 4
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Backing Track with Part 4 to give you the idea.
Attached File  counterpoint.mp3 ( 1.42MB ) Number of downloads: 371

Backing Track Without Lead for practicing Parts 1-4.
Attached File  nolead2.mp3 ( 1.42MB ) Number of downloads: 356



Lesson #32 - Turning lessons in to licks/chops for use in guitar solos Part IV

We have four licks/chops we are going to try to work in to using as bits for a solo over a backing track. These will have a pentatonic/blues feel but will make use of alternate picking, bending, etc.

Part 1
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Part 2
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Part 3
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Part 4
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Backing Track
Attached File  Lesson32_NoLead.mp3 ( 1.86MB ) Number of downloads: 363



Lesson #33 - Working your stretch

In this lesson, we are going to work on our "Stretch". Basically, we are going to take a shape and use it practice several techniques. Try this shape using "hammer ons" (pick the first note on each string and hammer on the rest), "Alternate Picking" (pick each note and alternate your stroke, up, down, up down), and "Tapping" (use both hand and tap each note instead of picking it). Let's take a look at our tablature.

33a
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33b
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33c
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33d
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Lesson #34 - Working your stretch, strengthening your left hand and increasing your speed

We are going to expand a bit on our last lesson where we worked on patterns to help your stretch and strengthen your left hand. Working up Strength in your left hand is critical in becoming a balanced player. The choice of whether to pick a note or do a hammer on should be one of musical choice instead of practical necessity. We are going to add a shape that is a bit easier to play in order to get up more speed and a shape that's a bit harder to play to work up our precision. Let's expand on the first patterns/shapes we did last week and make them a bit more complex.

*Very Similar to lesson 20, this one is just to get your hands warm and allow you to focus on speed.
34a (Speed)

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*This next pattern I tried out with a few students as an improv last session and they all nailed it so I"m tabbing it out and adding to the actual lesson here.
34b (Speed, Stretch, strengthen)

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*This is the final version of this pattern where we incorporate our down 3 back 1 approach. I think we will be able to crank this up to crazy speeds.
34C (Speed, Stretch, strengthen, precision)

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Lesson #35 - Developing Licks and Solos from Patterns and Scales

Today we are going to look at another way to approach a given scale. We will then take this pattern and apply it to the Minor Scale at the A position. Afterward, we will transpose it to E Minor and use it as a solo lick with backing track. Here is our first tablature.

Lets first look at a way to run a given scale.
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Now lets apply that to the A minor scale, it would work in any key though.
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Here is the backing track from today's lesson. Download it and see if you can play the Minor pattern in the key of E as a solo with the backing track.
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Lesson #36 - Shredding the Ionian Mode

Let's take a look at the IONIAN scale. We have been using Minor shapes, some major shapes, and various other bits so it's high time to add a fresh scale in to this mix. Here is a bit about the scale from Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ionian_mode

"Ionian mode is the name assigned by Heinrich Glarean in 1547 to his new authentic mode on C (mode 11 in his numbering scheme), which uses the diatonic octave species from C to the C an octave higher, divided at G (as its dominant, reciting note or tenor) into a fourth species of perfect fifth (tone–tone–semitone–tone) plus a third species of perfect fourth (tone–tone–semitone): C D E F G + G A B C (Powers 2001a). This octave species is essentially the same as the major mode of tonal music "

There is a finger shift that we will take some practice at before we start playing the full scale. Let's work out our fingering first.
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Now lets run the entire scale in the key of G.

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Now lets' do a variation that you should be able to work out without looking at the notes once you recognize the pattern.
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Lesson #37 - Advanced Shredding in the Ionian/Major Mode

In this lesson we are going to continue working with Ionian/Major modes and see how fast we can work up our speed. Here is a preview of what this lesson will sound like when played fast.

Here is the tablature for today and below that are two GUITAR PRO files in ZIP archives. So if you have GUITAR PRO, download the zip file and extract it, then open the Guitar Pro file.
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Attached File  Lesson_37a.gpx.zip ( 13.44K ) Number of downloads: 280

Attached File  Lesson_37b.gpx.zip ( 13.32K ) Number of downloads: 268



Lesson #38 - Alternate Picking/Economic Picking

Today we are going to get back to ALTERNATE PICKING! Let's start with a warmup using our "Back and Forth" Technique. And then work up our speed on a three string pattern and then go in to our third piece which is a combination of Ionian and Blues scales. So a little "Hybrid" work.
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Attached File  38a.gpx.zip ( 13.03K ) Number of downloads: 261

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Attached File  38b.gpx.zip ( 12.94K ) Number of downloads: 263

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Lesson #39 - Strict Alternate Picking (Focused on Difficult Finger Combinations)

Today's lesson will focus on very strict Alternate Picking. In previous lessons we have combined Alternate Picking with Economic Picking. Not today. Let's focus on one of the more difficult finger combinations again as well. The last two fingers. The Pinky and Ring Finger as a combination are often much harder to get working synced up and fast as compared to the Index Finger and Pinky combination. So today's work will focus on the last two fingers and combine that with a strict alternate picking workout in order to get your hands accustomed to playing in synch with each other while Alternate Picking at high rates of speed. So precision is a big focus here.

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PART A
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PART B
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PART C
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Lesson #40 - Combining Inversions / Techniques

In todays lesson we are going to combine several things we have been working on and end up with one hybrid "lick" that will work in a solo and as a workout for your fingers. On the way we are going to get your fingers/forearms up to snuff by working on endurance, accuracy and speed.


First up. Lets warm up. Do some wrist rolls and gentle stretches and once your arms are ready, lets start with a drill that will help your finger reach and your left hand speed. Only pick this drill once per string. Lets see how fast we can work this up.
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Next up, Lets extend the pattern we did in one of our recent lessons all the way from the high to low string and then run it in reverse. Once we have it, lets march it up the neck a bit.
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Lesson #41 - Pentatonic Finger Torture Part III
SAT: 5:00 EST 22 GMT
In this lesson we are going to revisit our "Pentatonic Finger Torture" lessons and expand on the ideas we worked with. This will combine hammer on, pull off, alternate picking, pinch harmonics, and tapping. Essentially, using the Pentatonic structure as a basis for exploring nearly every technique we have done to date.

Part 1: Warm Up
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Part 2: Shredding in A Pentatonic
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Part 3:Hammer On Technique and the extended Pentatonic Scale
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Lesson #42 - Alternate Picking / Economic Picking / Soloing in D Minor

In this lesson we are going to focus again on our Alterate and Economic Picking as well as soloing in the D Minor Scale.

First, lets warm up a bit and work on our endurance.
Part 1: Warm Up
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Now lets work on our speed.
Part 2: Working up Speed.
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Lastly, lets apply some of what we've learned in our lessons so far and work on soling. We are going to use the Key of "D Minor".
Here is a handy scale chart generated by the GMC SCALE GENERATOR. Notce the Blue circles. They are root notes. Try to construct a long scale run
across many frets that starts and ends on a root note.
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Here is the backing track for download.
Attached File  TearsinRain_GMC_Versioin.mp3 ( 2.64MB ) Number of downloads: 330


Lesson #43 - Alternate Picking With Ascending and Descending Inversions

In this lesson we are going to work on our precision more so than our speed at first. Lets warm up.

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Now lets do a scale in version ascending and descending with an inversion. Sort of a "tonque twister:" for your fingers.

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Lesson #44 - Alternate Picking/Economic Picking and Legato Phrasing in Musical Context

We are going to take two asymmetrical halves (essentially one ascending and one descending lick) and combine them in to one musical phrase. We are then going to work on various methods of playing it. Once we have it down, we are going to play it in a musical context against a backing track. I want you to see how you can build a lick and then how the lick can come alive when played with music.

Let's warm up a bit first.

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Playing/Shredding/etc. is only half of the equation. Technique alone won't save you, you need to be able to play well but it's critical that you learn to play well in a musical context. Lead guitar without music behind it can be great, but it's often even better when played with and against actual music. Lets move on to Part 1 of todays lesson.

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Now lets play a different pattern on the way down. Mixing patterns like this in an asymmetrical way, is great practice for your brain to allow it to get used to playing different things in different directions instead of playing the same thing ascending and descending. Let's take a look at the second part.

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Here is the backing track we are going to play over.
Attached File  Lesson_44_lick_loop_.mp3 ( 418.49K ) Number of downloads: 333


Here is the extended B Minor Scale.
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Lesson #45 - Hammer On / Pull Off / Alternate Pick

In this lesson we will work a bit on our Hammer On and Pull off Technique. Have a look at our warm up.
Open String
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Play each position four time and then play this on all 6 strings. Try to strike/pick only once per string and Hammer On the rest.

Once you get used to that, try to reverse the pattern and turn it in to a pull off workout.

Also, try tapping/hammering by doing the same thing but tapping at the 12th fret on each string instead of picking.

Let's also work a bit on our Alternate and Economic picking. Look at the Tablature below and memorize the pattern. Try playing it at various spots on the neck. See how fast you can play it and keep it clean. Try to find spots that economic picking would work better than Alternate Picking.

Part A
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Lesson 46 - Alternate Picking in Context (Open String Work vs Fretted Work)

Let's warmup by using the picking pattern we started last time and now use it in a scale. In this case, let's do something in the Major Scale. Take a look at the tab.

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Now let's do a Major feel but with an open string. Check out the tab. Notice that the pattern isn't symmetrical.

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Now lets take the warmup through Two Octaves. Both of these will work when we play against our backing track.

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Now here is the backing track using Both of the licks we just worked on.

Attached File  Lesson_46.mp3 ( 1.76MB ) Number of downloads: 302


Here it is without lead guitar. This is your shot to add the lead! Try the first two things we worked on.

Attached File  Lesson_46_no_lead.mp3 ( 1.31MB ) Number of downloads: 308



LESSON 47 (Learning to Play The Impossible) - Working Your Stretch and Playing Without Your Thumb!

It has come to my attention that several students are struggling with hand position and in order to help work through it, we are going to work on our stretch and (get this) learn to play WITHOUT YOUR THUMB!
First, lets warm up and work our stretch. So do our usual warm up stretches and wrist rolls. Once you are warm, take a look at this tablature. Let’s alternate pick this as it’s only on one string so no traverse is involved and it will be good practice.

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We will work our way up on this. At it’s toughest point, this involves an 8 Fret Stretch. That is a serious, killer, massive, stretch and you may not be able to do it at first. Don’t worry, it will come.

Let’s now do a bit more of a “Hammer On” thing, this will push up our speed while using the stretch we just worked on. So strike only once on the open string, and hammer on the other two notes per section.

47 A
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In addition to playing this using hammer ons, etc. It can also be done without a pick using just tapping/hammering/pulling off. Try to Tap at the 12th fret using the first finger and play the rest of the pattern. Experiment with various tapping patterns.


Now let’s work on our left thumb. Thumb placement on the neck is critical. And if you already have bad habits on thumb placement, it can really get in your way and stop you from getting better. So let’s take the thumb out of the equation. Once you can generate enough finger strength to not need your thumb on the neck, you can essentially re-learn your thumb placement as you can essentially play without it, so adding it back becomes easier.

Let’s revisit LESSON 4 from our notes page and try it simply play it while your left thumb floats free and doesn't touch the guitar neck.

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Now let’s add a bit of complexity in, here is our first “Back and Forth” lesson, LESSON 5. Again, let’s try it without the thumb.
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LESSON 48 (Exploring Various Methods of Shred)

As the old saying goes “There is more than one way to skin a cat”, feline cruelty aside, this idea applies to guitar as well. There is more than one way to shred a given scale, lick, etc.

Let’s take a shape we worked with recently and move it around a bit using various methods of shred. First up, let’s warm up a bit using mostly “Hammer Ons”.

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Next up, let’s reverse this pattern and use “Pull Offs”.
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Now, lets try strict alternate picking and go both directions in the same lick.
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Finally, let’s cheat our speed up by throwing an extra finger in to the mix and taking the pick out of the equation.

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LESSON 49 (Taking it one step further)

Let’s take what we did last week once step further. We did some tapping and used two fingers on our left hand and added an open string. This week, lets add a finger on our left hand so that we are using three fingers on our left and an open string. This results in the tapping note, three fretted notes and one open string for a total of 5 notes/tones per grouping. When this is sped up it sounds like you are playing unbelievably fast.

First, let’s warm up a bit. For this warm up, let’s pick the first note and “Hammer On” the other two. So three notes per string, but only one pick stroke per string. Also, try to palm mute this.
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Now let’s get in to our tapping. Here is the tablature. Once you get this pattern, let’s change only the right hand. After each cycle, move the right hand tapping up once fret. Move from 12th one at a time up to 15th with the right hand tapping finger.
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Now let’s work on adding different three note shapes to our left hand. This may seem like a challenge at first, but with some practice you will be doing this with ease.
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LESSON 50 : (Alternate/Economic/Hybrid Picking & Playing without Picking or the Left Thumb)

Let’s get back to focusing on our picking. Also, let’s continue to work on our Pinky! Take a look at this tab. It looks like a LOT of notes, but it’s not really that bad as it’s the same shape on each string. Use either Alternate Picking, Economic Picking, or as I often do, Hybrid Picking where you use Economic to ascend, and alternate to descend.
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OK. Now lets try the same thing without our picking hand. Grab the neck to mute the strings, or mute at the bridge.

Lastly, back to PLAYING THE IMPOSSIBLE. Let’s not use our left thumb! So no picking hand, and no left thumb! Fingertips only.

Now let’s move on to our featured example of the day. It’s a bit more complicated than our warmup but not by much take a look at the tab.
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As you might have guessed, let’s do it without the pick! And then without the thumb as well!

By the time you can play this at speed using only your fingertips, you are well on your way. Now change the angle of the guitar with your right handing on the neck. Try to push the neck straight up play.
Practice!

LESSON 51 : Shredding Whole Tone Scales
In this lesson, let’s work with a “Whole Tone” Scale. We have not done much with this scale shape yet. It does require lots of STRETCHING. Make sure to do your “Finger Splits” and get your hands nice and flexible before attempting any of this. So let’s Warm up. NEVER FORGET! Do Your Stretches! smile.gif
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Now let’s take it up a notch and add a pattern we have been using to the scale. This is our “Up 3, Down 1” pattern that you should know by heart at this point. I want you to see how this pattern can work on just about any scale. Because of the space between frets, this will seem a bit challenging at first. If you feel pain STOP PLAYING.
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Now let’s make it a bit more complicated and use a pattern from last time so we can focus on speed and fingering and not learning a new pattern. The only difference is that we are using all whole tones.
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HERE ARE ALL THE GUITAR PRO FILES FOR LESSON 51
Attached File  GuitarPro6_Lesson51.zip ( 191.84K ) Number of downloads: 246


LESSON 52 : Shredding The Harmonic Minor Scale

Here is the GUITAR RIG 4 Patch used in the preview video and during the Video Chat Lesson. Make a great lead patch smile.gif
Attached File  Lesson52.ksd.zip ( 5.32K ) Number of downloads: 261




In this lesson, let’s work with a “Harmonic Minor” Scale. The Harmonic Minor has a sort of Asian or Middle Eastern vibe to it and can make any solo sound a bit more exotic. Bands like “Melechesh” and “Nile” have incorporated this sound in to Modern Death Metal expanding the limits of the form and bringing new life to it’s traditional structures. Google these bands and check them out on youtube as well.


As usual, before we get going, let’s warm up!


NEVER FORGET! Do Your Stretches!

And remember, If you feel pain STOP PLAYING!

For our warmup, we are going to use a shape that we are going to use also in our fingering of the Harmonic Minor Scale. We are going to avoid the traditional fingering of the scale after going through it once for reference. Instead of the usual way of playing it, we are going to use the traditional “Shredish” approach of using three notes per string all the way up and down so that the scale flows more smoothly at high speed. So here is our shape.
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Now lets get our fingers a little more familiar with this shape using a bit more compiclated pattern. We are working our stretch here in a BIG way. This is the same pattern we have been using to explore shapes so it should be familiar. Hopefully this will allow you to focus on the stretch and not the pattern.
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Now let’s look at the “Shred” fingering of the same scale where we are going to try to put three notes on each string to make it run a bit faster and more efficiently.
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Experiment with this scale and see if you can add it in to your solos!


LESSON 53 : Open String Pentatonics

Let's work again with the Pentatonic Scale. We are going to use open strings in order to get our usual 3 note per string pattern so that the overall flow of notes is a bit smoother.

Here is the warmup.

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Now let's work on a pattern we will need for our final piece.
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Here is our final Piece.
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Here is a ZIP file with all the Guitar Pro Files for Lesson 53
Attached File  53GUITARPROFILES.zip ( 94.19K ) Number of downloads: 237


LESSON 54 :Expanding Harmonic Minor

Let’s take another look at the Harmonic Minor Scale. We worked with this scale recently in a previous lesson and it’s about time we add a bit to it.

Let’s tackle a couple of tough shapes then put them together.
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Now lets work on the "Shred Fingering" of the Harmonic Minor. In other words, using three notes per string.

SHRED FINGERING OF HARMONIC MINOR
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LESSON 55: Building Long Scale Runs

Let’s work on building a scale run over several frets. We will use the familiar G scale as a basic. Focus on the run, you should already know the scale.

Example A
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Example B
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Let’s put it all together and go crazy in the next example.
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Attached File  Lesson55_GuitarPro5_Files.zip ( 1.83K ) Number of downloads: 250


LESSON 56: Shred in Context / Solo Work

Let’s work on playing with music again. We will use some chops we already know and add some new ones in. Let’s start with a new one.

*Here is the backing track we are going to be playing with as an MP3.

Attached File  56BackingTrack.mp3 ( 2.62MB ) Number of downloads: 283


*Here is the backing track as a REAPER project so you can mix / remix / record at will!

Attached File  Lesson56Reaper.zip ( 7.15MB ) Number of downloads: 225



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Let’s also add a tapping part.

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Now let’s use something we have used before but in context. This is an A Minor Inversion.

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Now let’s reverse this.

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LESSON 57 - Harmonic Minor / Natural Minor In Context


LESSON #57 - Shred in Context Part II
Let’s use the Harmonic Minor (shred fingering version) and Natrual Minor scale against a backing track. We will start with a metronome, then move to a backing track of drums/bass/guitar.

Here is our first shape. It involves a rather awkward finger series. Let’s give it a shot.
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Take a look at this shape that uses a shape that sounds Major. We are going to play it in a context with music where it sounds minor.
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Now lets mix in a Harmonic Minor shape done in “Threes” or three notes at a time. Here is the first part.
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Here is the BACKING TRACK to play against once you have the shapes down. Start with a metronome, then switch to the music. Until you start playing with music, you aren't playing music, just scales. So playing with music and doing so "musically" is important.
Attached File  57BackingMix.mp3 ( 2.85MB ) Number of downloads: 270



LESSON #58 - Shred in Context Part III

Let’s take a look now at the rythm part we worked with last week. It’s a good example of using alternate and economic picking in the same phrase. You can do it strict alternate, or mix and max economic. In short, it’s a great way to find what picking style works for you. As you speed this up, your hand will have to decide which way to go. There is not “right” way really, just what’s “right” for your hand, style, etc.

Here is the tablature for the riff.
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This backing is played on the A then on the E string. In the Backing track it’s an A to E modulation. However, you could play this on any open string giving you the ability to create a backing in E, A, D, G, or B as a primary tone.

Let’s play this pattern once on each string.
Now that you have the backing down, let’s move in to the Advanced Solo section. This is a Harmonic Minor pattern in the key of A, that seems daunting at first, but give it a shot. If you can work out the intro, the rest will come easily. We have yet to play this as a group but I”m hoping we can today.
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Now let’s play the full scale this way.
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Now let’s do a Natural Minor Scale by “Threes”. This will also work against our backing track and will work as a solo lick and a hand workout. Here is the descending tab.

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Here is the ascending Tab.
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Practice!
Todd

ABOUT TODAY'S GUITAR TONE (Here is what I'm using)

I"m using GUITAR RIG 4 during today's lesson so it's a SOFTWARE ONLY tone. NO AMP. The great thing about software is that you can "fake" having a ridiculously pricey amp, towering rack of outboard gear and a large studio room to record in. For home recording, this can be very handy. Trying to record and actual Amp in the same room with the speakers/monitors that you are trying to use to determine what the Microphone is hearing is fraught with problems. Here is the preset in a zip file.

Attached File  GuitarRig4Preset_Lesson58.zip ( 5.38K ) Number of downloads: 225


You can download a FREE version of Guitar Rig to get you started. Here is the link to download KOMPLETE FREE.
http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=36238

*Here is the REAPER multitrack project for Lesson 58 as a zip.
Attached File  GuitarRig4Preset_Lesson58.zip ( 5.38K ) Number of downloads: 225


LESSON 59 - TRIPLE PICKING AND TRIADS

In this lesson we are going to work from the bottom up and learn the backing and then some patterns to go on top of it. We are going to introduce “TRIPLE PICKING” in to our bag of tricks as well. We have done “Double Picking” but this will be our first with triple picking. Let’s get started. smile.gif

Here is the Backing Track we are going to be working with.

Attached File  Lesson59backing.mp3 ( 1.33MB ) Number of downloads: 226


Here is a series of tabs. Let’s take them one at a time.

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Here are the GUITAR PRO 5 TABLATURE FILES in one Zip for the previous tabs. This all looks much more complex than it actually is.

Attached File  Lesson59_GuitarProFiles.zip ( 2.35K ) Number of downloads: 192


Also, here is the GUITAR RIG 4 Custom Preset that I created for this lesson. It's the same preset used on the backing. Enjoy!

Attached File  Lesson59GuitarRig4_Prest.zip ( 5.47K ) Number of downloads: 188


BONUS: Overhanded Tapping

*Let’s look briefly at “Overhanded Tapping”. This is a very flashy technique and goes great on stage. I recently used this technique in DANIEL REALPE’s “Heavy Static” Collab here on GMC. Here is a link to the Collab. Some great takes by GMC folks!

http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...mp;#entry523149

Here is a link to my solo take using over hand tapping.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPN8uCEDw3E

This is essentially a basic tapping/hammering technique. The only difference, is that we are going to do it “Overhand” or with our hand in front of the neck instead of behind it. This means we are going to use our left had in reverse from what we would normally do

LESSON 60 - PLAYING THE IMPOSSIBLE CONT'D (Playing Full Solos With One Hand)


Let’s work on playing with one hand for a bit. This is a great way to work on left hand strength. Making your left hand stronger will make life a bit easier for your right hand and open up your playing in a way you may not have thought possible.

As an example, check out the one handed solo I did for the Ivan Collab “Heavy Water”.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wklsFd5BMaI

Notice I never use the left hand and thus never a pick. So every note has to be hammered on and pulled off with the left hand. This technique is quite simple to use with just a bit of practice. It also works well in live situations as “Stage Effect” so to speak. Pulling your guitar up and doing your solo with one hand isn’t something the band playing before or after you is likely to be able to repeat.

*Here is a link to the GUITAR PRO 5 Files for today’s lesson.
http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...st&id=23725

Let’s get started. Here is our first shape.
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Let’s take things up a notch and add a little difficulty.
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Now let’s do this same technique across three strings.
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FOR THE REST OF THE LESSONS CHECK THE WIKI! (Special Thanks to GMC WIKI GOD Fran!) Here is the link!

http://bit.ly/twtgmc


This post has been edited by Bogdan Radovic: Mar 23 2012, 12:11 PM
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Attached File(s)
Attached File  Lesson_44_Warmup.gpx.zip ( 12.96K ) Number of downloads: 237
Attached File  38a.gpx.zip ( 13.03K ) Number of downloads: 242
Attached File  58BackingTrackReaper.zip ( 7.62MB ) Number of downloads: 209
 


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Todd Simpson
post Apr 9 2010, 09:08 PM
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See you this Saturday in the VIDEO CHAT ROOM for the next installment of our Alternate Picking Series!

Join me for a LIVE VIDEO CHAT LESSON
this Saturday, In the Video Chat Room.
5:00 PM EST
10:00 PM CEST
10:00 PM UK

GMC VIDEO CHAT

This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Nov 24 2010, 02:50 AM


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thefireball
post Apr 24 2010, 09:41 PM
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Here is my level and skill for the AP speed technique we have been working on in the chat. smile.gif


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXobU_4i6Kc


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Santiago Diaz Ga...
post Apr 25 2010, 05:53 AM
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Very useful material man!


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Bogdan Radovic
post May 2 2010, 03:57 AM
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This is gold for all those wanting to play fast! I recommend it! I'll try to attend these live sessions, even though I play bass some stuff can be applied! smile.gif


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superize
post May 6 2010, 09:43 AM
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Hey Todd i recorded this from the latest lesson



Its played 4 notes per beat at 120 bpm


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Todd Simpson
post May 6 2010, 04:25 PM
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Very well played! Your muting is very good and your technique is great. Keep it up!
Todd
Its played 4 notes per beat at 120 bpm[/quote]

This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: May 6 2010, 04:33 PM


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Todd Simpson
post May 8 2010, 05:07 AM
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BTW, here is a great video about working with a Metronome right here on GMC! For those not familiar with how to use a metronome to help your practice sessions, watch this vid!

KILLER VIDEO ON USING A METRONOME TO HELP PRACTICE!


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thefireball
post May 15 2010, 10:47 PM
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this is what i was referring to

(picking with your fingers on a bend)



[topic in video chat]

This post has been edited by thefireball: May 15 2010, 10:51 PM


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Jesse
post May 15 2010, 10:54 PM
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these are my coolest ones


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Todd Simpson
post May 24 2010, 05:01 AM
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TIPS AND TRICKS FOR ALTERNATE PICKING!

ALTERNATE PICKING TIPS AND TRICKS
1.)Choke up on the pick. Only the point should be sticking out.
2.)Try holding the pick so that the point is at a 90 degre angle to your thumb.
3.)Try a very heavy pick, 1.2 MM or greater so as to eliminate "flex" in the pick.
4.)Try to sharpen your pick to a point with sandpaper or dremmel or what not so that the surface area
striking the string is as small as possible. There are some "training" picks that are shaped this way on purpose.
5.)Work with a metronome ALWAYS so that you keep your picking even.

6.)MOST IMPORTANT: Join me this saturday and every saturday for a live VIDEO CHAT lesson on ALTERNATE PICKING. We have been doing a series on that very topic for several weeks now. Here are the notes so far. Many great workouts to try.


Above all
Practice!


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Todd Simpson
post May 29 2010, 04:23 AM
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FIREBALL: Are you talking about a pinch Harmonic? When you make a high pitctched squealing sound? That technique?

Todd

This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: May 29 2010, 04:23 AM


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thefireball
post May 29 2010, 07:08 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ May 28 2010, 10:23 PM) *
FIREBALL: Are you talking about a pinch Harmonic? When you make a high pitctched squealing sound? That technique?

Todd



I was referring to the technique done here: http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/solo-guit...ck-solo-lesson/
Trond sorta uses his fingers to pick instead of his wrist. It's at the very beginning, bending on the 12th fret, (seen easier in part one of the lesson when he does a close-up of his right hand).

that's all. wink.gif

This post has been edited by thefireball: May 29 2010, 07:09 AM


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VHalen
post Jun 12 2010, 09:04 PM
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Steve Lukather - Emotive Soloing

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSHcnqra91c


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Alexiaden93
post Jul 17 2010, 08:24 PM
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Hey man! I've been working on applying the music theory I've learned, and am attempting to write some film music with GuitarPro. Check it out biggrin.gif

http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...mp;#entry491538


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thefireball
post Jul 17 2010, 08:49 PM
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Trond Vold's lesson with the huge stretch from frets 8 to 14.

Demonstrated in lesson video part 9

http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/rhythm-gu...e-metal-drop-d/


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thefireball
post Jul 24 2010, 08:42 PM
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Bad pickup buzz

This post has been edited by thefireball: Jul 24 2010, 08:56 PM


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Azzaboi
post Jul 24 2010, 10:28 PM
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thefireball - is the bad pickup buzz on a certain fret and/or string or overall?
Your's sounds like it's doing it when the strings vibrate right?

Check it unpluged from the amp, you might have the action on those strings too low when you play / press down at that point the string vibrates slightly rubbing on the higher frets, play each note on the fretboard, if you hear a slight scratch or see it rub on the higher notes you can tell. I had this when a 'so-called' professional lowered my strings, but only occured on the top E string after playing above the 12th fret. Easy fix, very small adjust to the bridge height.



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thefireball
post Jul 24 2010, 10:57 PM
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QUOTE (Azzaboi @ Jul 24 2010, 04:28 PM) *
thefireball - is the bad pickup buzz on a certain fret and/or string or overall?
Your's sounds like it's doing it when the strings vibrate right?

Check it unpluged from the amp, you might have the action on those strings too low when you play / press down at that point the string vibrates slightly rubbing on the higher frets, play each note on the fretboard, if you hear a slight scratch or see it rub on the higher notes you can tell. I had this when a 'so-called' professional lowered my strings, but only occured on the top E string after playing above the 12th fret. Easy fix, very small adjust to the bridge height.


No, it does it also when the guitar is idle. You can hear it even when I'm not playing, as shown in the second video.


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 24 2010, 11:29 PM
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Test it on an amp in a different place, like a music store. If it's still doing it, it's your guitar. It could be the pickups themselves. Some pickups are noisey when driven hard. My RG550 is like that so I use a Noise Gate on it have to mute constantly with both hands.

Take it to a guitar tech in a shop you trust and see if he can test it and give you his thoughts. You may need better pickups. Make sure to try a guitar with the pickups you plan to buy. It won't be exactly the same, but it will be close.

Todd


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