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> Writing A New Song, help
ElHombre
post Feb 13 2012, 09:58 PM
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Hi

I often think of melodies in my head, guitar melodies by some reason when I go to sleep, often things i cant translate to the fretboard.
But I found a nice melody today which I was able to find on the fretboard, but I have know idea what key I should choose

Well you can select the melodic pattern anywhere on the neck problem is just which key I should choose.
Its a quite nice guitar line which I will have as my basic melody, returning to it, variating it etc.

also, should I make the chord progression before continuing the solo?


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Dinaga
post Feb 13 2012, 10:13 PM
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Hi!

Well the key is really just a matter of preference, usually I'd stick with the original idea (key) in my head but often I'd choose the key which is easiest for me to play, especially if it gives me some special benefits. For example, playing Iron Maiden's Wasted Years intro riff would really be awkward to play in a key other than E because of the notes on the open 1st string! Imagine playing this song in say C# tongue.gif

Natural harmonics are another reason, they are easier if you are in Em or Am because you can play around the 5th and 7th fret and keep the melody fitting to the song... It's all about which key gives you more options.

But of course, making songs in different keys gives your music more versatility. In my opinion, it's more interesting to hear 5 tracks in a row all in different keys, than to listen to 5 tracks in a row in the key of E.

If you are creating a song for a band and there is a singer, it's a different story because you have to adapt everything to the singer's vocal range.

If your guitar is drop-tuned chances are you'll probably end up in the key of the open lowest string, because it's the coolest, most awesome choice and gives you the most options biggrin.gif

And to answer your second question: Yes! I really recommend you to do the chord progression for the solo before the actual solo because the rhythm guitar in solo is very important for the quality of the solo. Although it's not "in your face" noticable, good chord progression makes a good solo much better! And when you write the progression first, you'll adapt the solo so it fits to the progression and uses the moods created by the progression to be memorable and good-sounding. smile.gif

This post has been edited by Dinaga: Feb 13 2012, 10:16 PM


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Saddlefall
post Feb 13 2012, 10:32 PM
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Nicely put Dinaga smile.gif

I would choose Em or Am for the key, as those are the two I'm most used to, but that all depends on personal preference! I also agree that you should make a chord progression first, it will give a good baseline for continuing the solo and to build around it.


QUOTE (ElHombre @ Feb 13 2012, 09:58 PM) *
I often think of melodies in my head, guitar melodies by some reason when I go to sleep, often things i cant translate to the fretboard.

I have the exact same "problem".. So many crazy solos and riffs that I could never play.. always come to me when Im trying to sleep or something tongue.gif


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 14 2012, 03:48 AM
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Hi friend! Well, that way of creating melodies is really cool because you don't concentrate on theory, you just let your imagination fly. To find a cool chord progression you could record the melody and try different chords over it.. once again trust in your ears for this, you will find really original ideas if you work in this way. I usually create the melodies and progressions at the same time, I play chords and sing over it. That's the way that always work for me.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 14 2012, 08:51 AM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Feb 14 2012, 02:48 AM) *
Hi friend! Well, that way of creating melodies is really cool because you don't concentrate on theory, you just let your imagination fly. To find a cool chord progression you could record the melody and try different chords over it.. once again trust in your ears for this, you will find really original ideas if you work in this way. I usually create the melodies and progressions at the same time, I play chords and sing over it. That's the way that always work for me.


For me as well smile.gif the fun part is, that the harmonic progression can vary over the same melody and the results are totally different and very interesting biggrin.gif


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 15 2012, 07:01 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Feb 14 2012, 04:51 AM) *
For me as well smile.gif the fun part is, that the harmonic progression can vary over the same melody and the results are totally different and very interesting biggrin.gif


yeah, it's awesome how much originality you can give to a song just changing the chords. It's very important to be careful when we do this because we must check that the melody don't stay to much in a note that doesn't sound good over the new chord that we are playing there. The best situation is when that note is a chord note.


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Ben Higgins
post Feb 15 2012, 07:13 PM
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I would recommend choosing a key that is not a sharp or flat, for example not using a chord like A# or C#. There's no need to make it more complicated for yourself if you don't need to. Also, perhaps just stick to a key that is close to where you hear in your head. smile.gif

For the solo.. pick a chord progression that already sounds good before you've even put a solo over it. If the chords sound good together, then there is less work for the lead guitarist to do to make a solo sound effective. Just a few chord tones will sound great and then you add to it from there. smile.gif



This post has been edited by Ben Higgins: Feb 15 2012, 07:15 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 15 2012, 08:45 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Feb 15 2012, 06:13 PM) *
I would recommend choosing a key that is not a sharp or flat, for example not using a chord like A# or C#. There's no need to make it more complicated for yourself if you don't need to. Also, perhaps just stick to a key that is close to where you hear in your head. smile.gif

For the solo.. pick a chord progression that already sounds good before you've even put a solo over it. If the chords sound good together, then there is less work for the lead guitarist to do to make a solo sound effective. Just a few chord tones will sound great and then you add to it from there. smile.gif


Sensei Ben speaks the truth! Pay heed to his wise words wink.gif


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The Uncreator
post Feb 16 2012, 03:49 AM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Feb 13 2012, 11:48 PM) *
Hi friend! Well, that way of creating melodies is really cool because you don't concentrate on theory, you just let your imagination fly. To find a cool chord progression you could record the melody and try different chords over it.. once again trust in your ears for this, you will find really original ideas if you work in this way. I usually create the melodies and progressions at the same time, I play chords and sing over it. That's the way that always work for me.


Thats all anyone needs to say.

When writing music, I trust my ears. I haven't used theory in many years, and it has not stopped me from writing. Theory over complicates the simplest idea sometimes.

Answer this question"

Does it sound good?

If it yes, then no more questions need be asked. You only need to know how good it sounds, and its place. Theory, is completely optional, think about it after the fact.
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Amir Razmara
post Feb 16 2012, 08:29 AM
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I think it would be easier for everyone to answer your questions if they could get an assessment of your theory knowledge at first.
So can you provide some information about what you know so we can figure out what you might need help with ?

1- Are you familiar with all your major and relative minor key's ?
2- have you had any ear training ?
2- Is it easy for you to find the key to a song, guitar in hand, when you hear it ?
3- do you know how to establish a key ?
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Alex Feather
post Feb 16 2012, 11:11 PM
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QUOTE (ElHombre @ Feb 13 2012, 08:58 PM) *
Hi

I often think of melodies in my head, guitar melodies by some reason when I go to sleep, often things i cant translate to the fretboard.
But I found a nice melody today which I was able to find on the fretboard, but I have know idea what key I should choose

Well you can select the melodic pattern anywhere on the neck problem is just which key I should choose.
Its a quite nice guitar line which I will have as my basic melody, returning to it, variating it etc.

also, should I make the chord progression before continuing the solo?

What you have to do is transcribe more music and learn how to sing melodies while you are playing! It will help you develop better understanding of the neck and you won't have any problems choosing the Key or finding notes on the fretboard!


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