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> 10 Tell-tale Signs Of An Amateur Mix
Mudbone
post Jun 16 2012, 09:02 PM
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Interesting article I found on MusicRadar.

http://www.musicradar.com/tuition/tech/10-...teur-mix-547621


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tonymiro
post Jun 17 2012, 11:08 AM
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Nice link Mudbone. I'd pretty much agree with that list - though some of those issues also apply to some pro studio mixes.

A couple of things that I'd add/alter though:

1/ get it right at recording rather then try to correct at mixing/mastering. Seriously, time spent getting the best possible recording will pay dividends in the end. It is pretty much impossible to rescue a bad recording at mixing or mastering but I come across an awful lot of people who expect this to happen.

2/ Don't do both the mixing and mastering. The two have different skill sets and require different room set ups and equipment. Mastering also requires objectivity and the mix engineer is very rarely objective enough to be able to critically assess their own mix in order to master it. (If they were then they would have corrected the issues at mixing rather than wait for mastering...)

3/No monitor is able to reproduce the frequency spectrum 0-20kHz. All monitors start to roll off in the bass end - anywhre from 100 Hz on down. Exactly where this corner frequency is and how much/quickly they roll off is a big issue if you want to hear the bass end with any degree of accuracy. The major issue with the majority of amateur mixes is not too little but too much bass. They can't hear the bass end (because their monitors roll it off too much) so they boost it. On a good recording if you are boosting any frequency band by more than a few dB you probably have a monitoring issue.


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Ben Higgins
post Jun 17 2012, 11:26 AM
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Nice input from Tony there smile.gif

All those tell-tale signs are probably ones I've had to deal with, except maybe the synth one laugh.gif


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thefireball
post Jun 17 2012, 02:41 PM
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Great advice!!!


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Todd Simpson
post Jun 20 2012, 01:59 AM
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KILLER tips from Tony as usual! The last tip in particular is CRAZY IMPORTANT: Most amateur mixes suffer from OVERBASS simply because they can't hear what's happening in the bottom end of their mix usually due to poor monitors or mixing on ear buds.

So by the time it sounds good, it will rip the sub in half in a full range system. (exaggerating but not by much). So if you have a small pair of monitors, get a GREAT PAIR OF HEADPHONES. Even a good pair. Soy something in the 1-200 euro/dollar range from AKAI, KRK, SHURE, (each have their drawbacks of course, most products under the price of a car usually do)


QUOTE (tonymiro @ Jun 17 2012, 06:08 AM) *
Nice link Mudbone. I'd pretty much agree with that list - though some of those issues also apply to some pro studio mixes.

A couple of things that I'd add/alter though:

1/ get it right at recording rather then try to correct at mixing/mastering. Seriously, time spent getting the best possible recording will pay dividends in the end. It is pretty much impossible to rescue a bad recording at mixing or mastering but I come across an awful lot of people who expect this to happen.

2/ Don't do both the mixing and mastering. The two have different skill sets and require different room set ups and equipment. Mastering also requires objectivity and the mix engineer is very rarely objective enough to be able to critically assess their own mix in order to master it. (If they were then they would have corrected the issues at mixing rather than wait for mastering...)

3/No monitor is able to reproduce the frequency spectrum 0-20kHz. All monitors start to roll off in the bass end - anywhre from 100 Hz on down. Exactly where this corner frequency is and how much/quickly they roll off is a big issue if you want to hear the bass end with any degree of accuracy. The major issue with the majority of amateur mixes is not too little but too much bass. They can't hear the bass end (because their monitors roll it off too much) so they boost it. On a good recording if you are boosting any frequency band by more than a few dB you probably have a monitoring issue.



Great article worth every second of reading time plus some.

QUOTE (Mudbone @ Jun 16 2012, 04:02 PM) *
Interesting article I found on MusicRadar.

http://www.musicradar.com/tuition/tech/10-...teur-mix-547621



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Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 20 2012, 09:32 AM
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Good stuff to read - it's important to know what's what and what you're paying for when having to deal with studio work! In here at least, there's A TON of people having a lot of money invested in tools and expensive gear/ software, but having NO CLUE on how to use them for great results... sad.gif


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