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> Santana Style Bossa Nova, I can't grasp the groove of the solo
obogz
post Jun 20 2012, 08:15 PM
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Hi everybody!

I started studying the Santana Style Bossa Nova lesson and I am close to finalizing the study, I am at about 90%.
I have a huge problem with the songs rhythm. I now can play close to perfect along with the main video but when I put the backing track I stumble often. I analyzed the song many times, counting along, and I observed that the instructor (Lazlo Boross) is not always on the beat he intentional dances around the beat to create the Santana natural singing style. I might be wrong I don't know.

So has anybody encountered this problem and if so could you please tell me how you got over it.

Tank you,
Bogdan.
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Ben Higgins
post Jun 21 2012, 08:16 PM
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Hi Bogdan, I know exactly what you're talking about in this lesson. I like to play like this myself. What's happening is that Lazslo plays a note, then there is a pause of the same duration of the note he just played and then he plays another note of same duration. It gives an impression of being staggered over the beat but rest assured that it is definitely in time, it's just not on the obvious beat counts.

A lot of the nots are 8th notes (or Eighth notes, hence the E in the tab) so if you counted 8 beats in a bar, one note would be a duration of one of those counts.

Let's look at the very first video part (the opening phrase). The first note is a note that last for half the bar. (If you divided the bar into 4 counts then halved that again, you would count 1,2 )

Then next there is an E symbol above the tab but no note. That means that first note lasts for half a bar plus an 8th note.

Then you play the next note (an 8th note) then there is another pause of 8th note duration, then play the next 8th note on the 13th fret which is the last note of that bar. Then an 8th note pause (called rests) begins the next bar...

It's quite hard to understand, I know ! First begin by counting 1,2,3,4 for a bar.. then double that up exactly so you get 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8. Now imagine that every one of those 8 notes was an actual note being played. Now imagine that some of those notes were pauses instead. That's how you get that strange, staggered effect.

That's the technical side of it anyway. I personally never counted this stuff.. I just found it easier to play it by instinct. But hopefully this may help you understand it a bit better. Maybe not. My theory isn't the best.

Maybe someone else can hop in and explain ? C'mon, let's help this poor guy out !!!!!

This post has been edited by Ben Higgins: Jun 21 2012, 08:18 PM


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Blister
post Jun 22 2012, 01:51 PM
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I also like this lesson & am surprised you haven't had many responses. I still consider myself beginner to intermediate so I didn't really feel skilled enough to respond. unsure.gif So I apologize if this is an oversimplification of what you already know. Besides, if you're at 90% then you are ahead of me! biggrin.gif

This lesson has a lot of emphasis on the upbeats. The fiirst note is on a downbeat, then the next 4 are upbeats. Perhaps listening to the full lesson (while not playing) & tap your foot to the beat. Make sure to notice the notes playing when your foot is up. I have probably been using Ben's "playing by instinct" but I believe he has a good point. Notes on a page are really just a guide & it's important to get the "feel" of the music. Sounds so easy but sometimes difficult to master.


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Ben Higgins
post Jun 22 2012, 02:37 PM
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QUOTE (Blister @ Jun 22 2012, 01:51 PM) *
I also like this lesson & am surprised you haven't had many responses. I still consider myself beginner to intermediate so I didn't really feel skilled enough to respond. unsure.gif So I apologize if this is an oversimplification of what you already know. Besides, if you're at 90% then you are ahead of me! biggrin.gif

This lesson has a lot of emphasis on the upbeats. The fiirst note is on a downbeat, then the next 4 are upbeats. Perhaps listening to the full lesson (while not playing) & tap your foot to the beat. Make sure to notice the notes playing when your foot is up. I have probably been using Ben's "playing by instinct" but I believe he has a good point. Notes on a page are really just a guide & it's important to get the "feel" of the music. Sounds so easy but sometimes difficult to master.


Your input is totally valid and I agree.. the only way to really get this under your skin is by just doing it. Experience is your best teacher smile.gif


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obogz
post Jun 23 2012, 12:56 AM
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I've been focusing on the downbeats while playing with the backing track and that confused.
I tried to go by instinct but when I am not shore on what beat I am and I try to find out and then I focus on the down beats and because of my inexperience I play the notes on the down beat thus I get lost.
I'll have to work harder on my rhythm so I can understand the song better.

Thank you very much for your advice guys,
you are realy great! smile.gif.

Cheers.

This post has been edited by obogz: Jun 23 2012, 12:57 AM
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