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Toroso
Hi David I thought I knew what an arpeggio was. mellow.gif Been going over some of your lessons in preparation for your Dorian collab as well as Ivan's arpegiator collab. Now I'm not so sure.

Can you explain to this simpleton what exactly an arp is? huh.gif
Wabba
Arpeggio is a chord that's played in pieces (=1 note at a time). So when sweeping, you play arpeggios, and when fretting chords you play chords smile.gif
Toroso
QUOTE (Wabba @ Jun 5 2009, 02:28 PM) *
Arpeggio is a chord that's played in pieces (=1 note at a time). So when sweeping, you play arpeggios, and when fretting chords you play chords smile.gif


That's what I understood it to be. I don't know of many chords that have two notes on the same string, so David's leesons have left me questioning.
Pedja Simovic
Toroso check this out I am sure it will help !

http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/arpegg...aboration_solo/
David Wallimann
QUOTE (Toroso @ Jun 5 2009, 02:30 PM) *
That's what I understood it to be. I don't know of many chords that have two notes on the same string, so David's leesons have left me questioning.


That's right, an arpeggio is a chord played one note at a time.
Usually, when you play a chord on the guitar, the notes of that chord are arranged a little differently than its theory construction.
For example, a C Major chord is a chord made out of the Root, Major 3rd and 5th.
If you were to play that chord on a piano it would be easy. But on the guitar, sometimes you'll need to reverse some of these notes for the fingering to be doable.
When playing an arpeggio, you are not limited to a vertical fretboard since you are playing one note at a time.. That is why you can find arpeggio fingerings spread across the fretboard using sometimes the same string for several notes.
Does that help?
Toroso
QUOTE (David Wallimann @ Jun 5 2009, 02:35 PM) *
That's right, an arpeggio is a chord played one note at a time.
Usually, when you play a chord on the guitar, the notes of that chord are arranged a little differently than its theory construction.
For example, a C Major chord is a chord made out of the Root, Major 3rd and 5th.
If you were to play that chord on a piano it would be easy. But on the guitar, sometimes you'll need to reverse some of these notes for the fingering to be doable.
When playing an arpeggio, you are not limited to a vertical fretboard since you are playing one note at a time.. That is why you can find arpeggio fingerings spread across the fretboard using sometimes the same string for several notes.
Does that help?


I see said the blind man! smile.gif Thanks, it makes better sense now.
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