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Paul Coutts
Hey Pavel,
I was wondering, and this is something that's been bothering me for awhile now...How do you write and compose music?
I know all 5 major scale positions and move them into all keys, I know the CAGED system, with lead patterns, barre chords, pentatonic scales and arpeggios..
But I having real trouble writing music...Do you have an methods to get out of my exercises routine and start playing music again?
I fear I've been dedicated to patterns and methods for so long, I've lost the music of it all
Cheers, dude
Paul
Pavel
I will give you an example similar to knowing all scales and stuff but not being able to write music....

You can know the whole English->German vocabulary but if somebody asks you to work as a translator on some live conference you wouldn't be able to translate 1 single sentence because using vocabulary and translating on fly is not the same thing.

Same goes here. You can know all the chords, scales, theory but if you have no ideas for music in your head nothing can help you.

I don't sit and write music on purpose. I write it when i have inspiration and some ideas in my head, than i sit with Sibelius and write down the notes for all the instruments i hear in my head. It can start with a simple groove for drums, or a bass line, or a guitar melody or some chord progression....

No one can teach you to compose or write a melody. They can teach you to edit an arrangement to sound good and some important things about multi-voicing, splitting voices for orchestra and similar stuff but nobody can teach you to write a melody. It's something you have to discover inside yourself.
KGZ
Don't worry you CAN do it. You just need a new mode of operation. Instead of learning patterns, learn songs. By learning songs you will naturally absorb some of the melodies and chord changes used by the artists. When you jam alone try to use bits and pieces of the songs you have learned. Ultimately you will slowly realize that you can write you own songs. Using Pavel's example, the only way one can truly learn to communicate in a language is by associating with those who speak it fluently and learning from them. You need to learn from skilled song-writers if you are to truly advance. Patterns and the CAGED system are a great base for you to apply the new knowledge though and should make the process easier. Good luck my friend.
Paul Coutts
Just wanted to update you guys...I went away for the weekend with some friends, camping n stuff, cleared my head away from guitar and listened to other styles of music (island-music, trance, etc...) stuff I don't USUALLY listen to, and came back thinking, I'm gonna slow down on the patterns and scales etc...and learn more songs...and honestly, it's a HELL of a lot easier than I thought it would be...I tackled In Flames' Clayman today, and it was fairly easy biggrin.gif
Thanks for the advice guys, I'm now back into it with more enthusiasm.
By the way, I played a gig the day I came back, which was AWESOME!
PlayAllDay
Good to hear biggrin.gif
I knew I was a songwriter years before I wrote my first song but I was so blocked up with similar stuff to what you described - didn't really know how to start. Kept thinking I had to reinvent the wheel. blink.gif
Then oneday I was feeling an emotion VERY strongly and a melody came into my head - just one line - so I sang it out loud...then grabbed my guitar and a pen and paper and two hours later - a song!

It wasn't too bad either and I still have that page today. I remember going to jam with some friends a few days later and I was just messing around playing the intro riff I had written for this song - one of my friends said "What's that? I like it." and I just shrugged and said "Oh it's just something I wrote" and felt REALLY good inside!! biggrin.gif

I've written loads of songs over the years since and people do like them and it is sometimes easy and sometimes hard but always fun, even the sad ones laugh.gif
In my book just the fact that you want to means you can and you WILL.
Jeff
QUOTE (Pavel @ Oct 10 2007, 04:09 PM) *
I will give you an example similar to knowing all scales and stuff but not being able to write music....

You can know the whole English->German vocabulary but if somebody asks you to work as a translator on some live conference you wouldn't be able to translate 1 single sentence because using vocabulary and translating on fly is not the same thing.

Same goes here. You can know all the chords, scales, theory but if you have no ideas for music in your head nothing can help you.

I don't sit and write music on purpose. I write it when i have inspiration and some ideas in my head, than i sit with Sibelius and write down the notes for all the instruments i hear in my head. It can start with a simple groove for drums, or a bass line, or a guitar melody or some chord progression....

No one can teach you to compose or write a melody. They can teach you to edit an arrangement to sound good and some important things about multi-voicing, splitting voices for orchestra and similar stuff but nobody can teach you to write a melody. It's something you have to discover inside yourself.


Hi Pavel,

I was reading through this post and I notice that you mention Sibelius. I never knew what that was and so I went to the website to check it out. It looks like a pretty nice software package. Do you recommend it? Does it work well for writing guitar score or tab?

Thanks! smile.gif
Pavel
It's mostly for orchestral instruments. Guitars are pretty hard to tab/notate in it....now i have to run, but when i come back later tonight i will post a screenshot of how it looks when you have the whole arrangement! smile.gif

EDIT: ok i am finally home and here is the screenshot! It's much easier to tab guitar in Guitar Pro for guitarists. If you are only writing music for bands, and some small arrangements than GP5 is more than enough.


Here is a screenshot of one of the compositions in progress:


Click to view attachment
Jeff
QUOTE (Pavel @ Oct 16 2007, 06:46 PM) *
It's mostly for orchestral instruments. Guitars are pretty hard to tab/notate in it....now i have to run, but when i come back later tonight i will post a screenshot of how it looks when you have the whole arrangement! smile.gif

EDIT: ok i am finally home and here is the screenshot! It's much easier to tab guitar in Guitar Pro for guitarists. If you are only writing music for bands, and some small arrangements than GP5 is more than enough.


Here is a screenshot of one of the compositions in progress:


Click to view attachment
Thanks. I was wondering about the guitar part. I think I'll stick with GP5. I see on their website that that have G7 for guitar, but it looks to be much of the same as GP5. Thanks Pavel! smile.gif
Paul Coutts
I used the toned-down version of Sibelius (Notepad) for my IB Music composition, and have to say, it's an awesome tool to have, especially for sight-reading and seeing how your ideas look as notation. Definetly use it. Notepad is for free.
I'll post a link a little later.
Thanks for the advice again, guys. Everytime I feel I'm too much into the patterns etc,...I re-read the thread, and I'm good again. Cheers. I kinda want to keep hearing peoples songwriting experience though, it's good inspiration I think.
Cheers, again
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