Profile
Personal Photo
Rating
 
Options
Options
Personal Statement
HungryForHeaven doesn't have a personal statement currently.
Personal Info
HungryForHeaven
Learning Tone Master
Age Unknown
Gender Not Set
Sweden
Birthday Unknown
Interests
No Information
Statistics
Joined: 31-December 10
Profile Views: 9.923*
Last Seen: 28th January 2017 - 10:07 AM
Local Time: Mar 27 2017, 02:41 PM
835 posts (0 per day)
Contact Information
* Profile views updated each hour

HungryForHeaven

Members

*


Topics
Posts
Practice Agenda
Comments
Friends
My Content
22 Nov 2014
I don't know if you're an ale man or not, but we're all well aware you are an AXE MAN of rank.
Just today, I ran into the beverage below, thought I should post it.

Attached Image

Ok, it gets turned 90 degrees for some reason, but you get the "picture".
22 Nov 2014
Clichés are clichés for a reason - someone did something good and others followed.

Vivaldi - Violin concerto in Am RV356 (3rd mvmt)
Beethoven - Piano Sonata #8 in Cm (3rd mvmt)
<At least one more Piano Sonata by Beethoven>
Malmsteen - Crash and Burn
Gary Moore - Still Got the Blues
I'm sure you can think of several others (feel free to post them here!).

Consider the following sequence of four opening notes: C-F-G-Ab.
Or root-4h-5th-m6th.
Or even 5th-root-2nd-m3rd.
Transposed to the key of your choice.
All of the above examples begin with the same four notes (relative to each other).

Which other well-used mini-themes can you think of?
Which are your favorites?
Do you find yourself ending up in any of these patterns when imporvising?
17 Mar 2014
Spring seemed to come early here this year, but we got some more snow all of a sudden. I figured I'd better record Winter Tune II before it melts away.. I used a couple of photos taken on a Christmas Eve, originally intended for other video projects. And a short "snow is falling by the street light" clip, shot today through my window. This is also a pilot project for my new computer. Sound quality is so-so, as I haven't figured everything out yet, but I think the levels are ok. Hope you enjoy it!

22 Dec 2013
I don't celebrate Christmas per se, but I like food and cooking. Rather than making traditional Swedish Christmas food, I've made it a bit of my own tradition this time of the year to cook something that I normally don't cook. This year, I decided to make my first ever Shepherd's Pie:

Attached Image

I don't know if it's supposed to look like that, but I already had a bite:

Attached Image

Was it any good? Well, how bad can it be with cheese from Somerset?

Attached Image

(Ben is gonna be so proud!)

Show us what you are making for the holidays (or whoever does the cooking in your family)!

Edit: I figured we don't have enough food threads anymore. Are you all on diets or something?
2 Nov 2013
Ok, so a while back in the Tuesday video chat, I tried to make a point by streaming video but the resolution did not allow for the required detail level. I therefore promised Darius to post a video to illustrate what I meant. I decided to also write down a few words in this context.

H



Without delving too deeply into details on properties of different materials, and avoiding technical talk about wave lengths and frequencies, there are three physical factors that are of practical importance for guitarists when it comes to affecting the pitch of a string: thickness, length, and tension.

A thick string gives a lower pitch than a thin string. A standard set of strings has the thicknesses adapted so that all strings have the same tension when the guitar is tuned in a standard fashion. Once the strings are in place, there's not much we can do to affect a string's thickness while actually playing, but we can use different string gagues for different situations.

A short string gives a higher pitch than a long string, making length our most critical factor - fretting adjusts, in discrete steps, the length of the vibrating part of the string, i.e. the distance between the two points to which the vibrating part of the string are attached namely the bridge and the fret.

A tense string gives a higher pitch than a loose string. This is widely employed among instrumentalists to add to the expression via small, continuous changes in the pitch (vibrato) and/or continuous transformations of the pitch between two discrete steps (bending).

Bending/vibrato can be applied in three dimensions, which we consider separately below, although in practice it
is usually a matter of a combination of the three.

(1) Perpendicular to the fretboard. Applying too much pressure on the string at a fret (or rather between two frets) increases the tension and thus gives a wanted or unwanted increase in pitch. This is part of the explanation to why beginners sometimes sound out of pitch even if their guitar is in tune, especially when playing chords (more than one string is fretted at once), as their fingers are still getting used to applying as little pressure as possible and at the right spot in order for the string to produce a clean sound. With a scalloped fretboard this can be and has been used with great success to literally add a dimension to the vibrato. The opposite direction (up and away from the fretboard) has little or no practical use.

(2) Parallel to the frets. This is the most common type of bending/vibrato. While the string is kept fretted, pushing or pulling the string parallel to the fret does increase the length somewhat (Pythagorean theorem), but the effect of this on the pitch is invalidated by the increase in tension, giving the string a higher pitch. By pulling and releasing, we make the pitch hover at and above the original pitch.

(3) Parallel to the strings. Fretting with e.g. 3rd finger, two fingers can back up the strength needed to pull the string laterally in either direction. This is sometimes referred to as classical vibrato, since this lateral motion is the same as used on e.g. a violin which has no frets. Pulling the string towards the headstock increases the tension and thus the pitch, while pulling it towards the bridge releases the tension giving the string a lower pitch. Thus this can make the pitch hover above as well as below the original pitch.

See the video for a description of the three.

Circular vibrato uses a combination of (2) and (3).




Last Visitors


18 Dec 2015 - 12:14


27 Nov 2015 - 23:49


8 Sep 2015 - 3:57


28 Jan 2015 - 16:18


28 Jan 2015 - 5:05

Comments
HungryForHeaven
Heh, thanks Slav. Or wasn't that a compliment?
13 Sep 2012 - 12:18
Slavenko Erazer
U have ULTIMATELY BEST Interest in the GMC mate ;)
13 Sep 2012 - 12:00

Friends

2290 posts
5th December 2014 - 06:41 PM

207 posts
9th March 2017 - 07:42 PM

1367 posts
Yesterday, 05:34 PM

877 posts
22nd September 2015 - 08:04 PM

0 posts
11th January 2017 - 11:18 PM
View All Friends

RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 27th March 2017 - 03:41 PM