Reply to this topicStart new topic
> 3rd String Tuned To C, 3rd string tuned to C
oscargt
post Oct 23 2019, 07:52 PM
Post #1


Learning Chord Basher
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3
Joined: 10-October 19
From: Mexico
Member No.: 23.832



Has anyone tried tuning 2nd string from B to C? EDIT: (my bad, I meant 2nd string)
Is that a good or bad idea?

My point on this is, if tuning by 4ths all strings can simplify learning less scales patterns throughout the fretboard.

You know anyone that does this? Is this worth it?

Since I am left-handed, I always play with my guitar, so no need to play others' (right-handed) guitars.

Thanks in advance for your comments. smile.gif

oscargt

This post has been edited by oscargt: Oct 24 2019, 07:26 AM


--------------------
Begginer at GMC, passionate for music and guitar
Guitars: Ibanez JS1200 LH Red, Ibanez RG470 LH Blue
Multi Effects Zoom G5
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Oct 24 2019, 07:44 PM
Post #2


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 19.170
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Well, folks have been using custom ways of tuning the guitar forever, so yeah, give it a whirl smile.gif Paul Gilbert tunes one of his axes just for a particular bit of shredding to make it easier. However, I would not suggest doing your learning on a guitar tuned like that. Learning ones scales, and the notes on the neck can seem tedious but it's just part of the process. So I'd say play around with whatever tuning you like, but I wouldn't develop a playing style based on it as playing with others, and reading tablature/music, might get strange.


Todd

QUOTE (oscargt @ Oct 23 2019, 02:52 PM) *
Has anyone tried tuning 2nd string from B to C? EDIT: (my bad, I meant 2nd string)
Is that a good or bad idea?

My point on this is, if tuning by 4ths all strings can simplify learning less scales patterns throughout the fretboard.

You know anyone that does this? Is this worth it?

Since I am left-handed, I always play with my guitar, so no need to play others' (right-handed) guitars.

Thanks in advance for your comments. smile.gif

oscargt
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Oct 25 2019, 03:10 AM
Post #3


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.544
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



Tom Quayle tunes all 4ths.
Robert Fripp likes tuning in 5ths.
There are a lot of players that tune to a different intervallic system but it's usually to get a specific sound or task.

As Todd mentioned though - not for beginners. A lot of things are gonna be more difficult, like chords. You tune that B string to a C and now what you going to do with your high E? Leave it or continue with the 4ths? Think about what that does to a simple open D or G chord.

There's a really good reason the guitar is tuned as it is - four 4ths and one major 3rd. It evolved over a couple of hundred years. The better you get, the more you'll see the genius of it.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Oct 25 2019, 05:30 PM
Post #4


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 19.170
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Pro Tips per usual! Good point on the E. What then? Also, get ready to adjust all of your chords that use that string. Might make playing fast lead riffs a bit easier in some cases not having to shift positions at the B string, but after re reading your first post it sounds like you are asking about doing it as a permanent modification which would not be great idea imho. Experimenting is always fun, but, one still needs to learn the basic chords and scales and the B shift is part of the fun smile.gif

Todd
QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 24 2019, 10:10 PM) *
Tom Quayle tunes all 4ths.
Robert Fripp likes tuning in 5ths.
There are a lot of players that tune to a different intervallic system but it's usually to get a specific sound or task.

As Todd mentioned though - not for beginners. A lot of things are gonna be more difficult, like chords. You tune that B string to a C and now what you going to do with your high E? Leave it or continue with the 4ths? Think about what that does to a simple open D or G chord.

There's a really good reason the guitar is tuned as it is - four 4ths and one major 3rd. It evolved over a couple of hundred years. The better you get, the more you'll see the genius of it.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
oscargt
post Oct 25 2019, 06:30 PM
Post #5


Learning Chord Basher
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3
Joined: 10-October 19
From: Mexico
Member No.: 23.832



Thanks Todd, klasaine for your comments and advice. Appreciate that.
I'll continue my learning with standar tuning and maybe in the future I'll try this.


--------------------
Begginer at GMC, passionate for music and guitar
Guitars: Ibanez JS1200 LH Red, Ibanez RG470 LH Blue
Multi Effects Zoom G5
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Oct 26 2019, 12:52 AM
Post #6


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 19.170
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Give it a whirl! Just don't lose your tuner! smile.gif Alt Tunings can be fun. The drop D tuning is used all the time. Some folks make it their standard tuning. I find it gets in the way of lead work just a pinch but it makes one finger power chords sound cool. smile.gif
Todd
QUOTE (oscargt @ Oct 25 2019, 01:30 PM) *
Thanks Todd, klasaine for your comments and advice. Appreciate that.
I'll continue my learning with standar tuning and maybe in the future I'll try this.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Oct 26 2019, 01:25 AM
Post #7


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.544
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



How about 'try it out' on a second guitar - ?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Oct 26 2019, 06:10 PM
Post #8


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 19.170
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Another fine suggestion. If a second guitar is available, tune it however you like and experiment smile.gif
QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 25 2019, 08:25 PM) *
How about 'try it out' on a second guitar - ?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
oscargt
post Oct 27 2019, 04:06 PM
Post #9


Learning Chord Basher
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3
Joined: 10-October 19
From: Mexico
Member No.: 23.832



Well, I do have a second guitar to experiment tuning.
Although to be honest, since both use Floyd Rose, it's a pain tuning it biggrin.gif
So, I'll think about this and keep practicing the good stuff in the meantime.
Thanks a lot for your comments and advice! smile.gif


--------------------
Begginer at GMC, passionate for music and guitar
Guitars: Ibanez JS1200 LH Red, Ibanez RG470 LH Blue
Multi Effects Zoom G5
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Oct 28 2019, 10:48 PM
Post #10


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 19.170
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Perfect! Having an extra guitar that can be used to experiment with alternate tunings is handy. You can even make up tunings and try chords on them to see if you like it. If it's got locking nuts, just leave it unlocked for quick access smile.gif

QUOTE (oscargt @ Oct 27 2019, 11:06 AM) *
Well, I do have a second guitar to experiment tuning.
Although to be honest, since both use Floyd Rose, it's a pain tuning it biggrin.gif
So, I'll think about this and keep practicing the good stuff in the meantime.
Thanks a lot for your comments and advice! smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 15th December 2019 - 12:30 AM