Intervals, 4th, 5th? What?
ygro
Jan 27 2012, 08:53 AM
Learning Apprentice Player
Posts: 41
Joined: 24-December 11
I´ve been reading the guitar grimoire, is very good but it´s in english & I´m a bit lost...

I need to confirm various things...

For example... a third interval has 4 notes, beginning in the root note???

3rd of C scale is...

C -C#-D-D#

or

C#-D-D#-E

I suppose that the second option is correct, E is 3rd deggre of scale...

THE QUESTION IS, NO MATTERwhat scale it is, a third interval will allways 4 notes beyond the root note?

another question...

what´s de meaning of the numbers in the notes over the fretboard (ex: G3, B4, etc???) and how I find can clearly in it?

I have a verry good game for my phone for learn the fretboard notes and there are a sub game in wich It says me a note (ej G3) and in the first 5 frets there are various (3 at least I think) G notes... I think that it´s not about intervals, therare only single notes...

I´m a bit lost, I want to learn some theory and need a little help. sad.gif smile.gif smile.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
Jan 27 2012, 09:29 AM
Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Hey mate biggrin.gif let's use a different approach:

the major scale formula is this one

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
w w h w w w h

between each interval we have a whole step (w) or a half step (h)

so more explicitly on an example:

C major scale: C D E F G A B C

w between C and D
w between D and E
h between E and F
w between F and G
w between G and A
w between A and B
h between B and C

now the distance between C and E is made up of a 2 whole steps that means C to C# to D to D# to E so add 4 notes on top of your C and you reach the major third, namely E. This is valid for a major scale, in the case of a minor scale, you will add 3 notes on top of yout C note and..presto -> Eb is your minor third.

hope this helps biggrin.gif

Cosmin

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Ben Higgins
Jan 27 2012, 10:40 AM
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Posts: 13.792
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From: England
Interval is the name for the notes of the scale.

A 3rd is literally the 3rd note of the scale. (This doesn't include notes that are not in the scale) smile.gif

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ygro
Jan 27 2012, 10:58 AM
Learning Apprentice Player
Posts: 41
Joined: 24-December 11
well it is a liitle more clear...
3rd ONLY the note in the scale

I was thinking that an interval was the space between the notes, not the notes...

thanks both

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Ben Higgins
Jan 27 2012, 11:38 AM
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From: England
QUOTE (ygro @ Jan 27 2012, 09:58 AM) *
I was thinking that an interval was the space between the notes, not the notes...


Well, you're right too ! smile.gif

The name interval does really refer to the distance a note is from another note. When you have a scale, there will be a 3rd in that scale which is THE 3rd of that scale. However you can still use the term 3rd to refer to another note that is 3 notes away from a note too.

For example, if we have the Am scale. The 3rd of that scale is C. However, let's pretend that you're playing the note of C and you want to harmonise it with another note. You can harmonise it with a note that is a 3rd above C (but still within the Am scale) which would be E. So E is 3 notes above C, so is a 3rd above it but it's not actually THE 3rd of Am. I hope that makes sense ?

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ygro
Jan 27 2012, 07:08 PM
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Posts: 41
Joined: 24-December 11
QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Jan 27 2012, 11:38 AM) *
Well, you're right too ! smile.gif

The name interval does really refer to the distance a note is from another note. When you have a scale, there will be a 3rd in that scale which is THE 3rd of that scale. However you can still use the term 3rd to refer to another note that is 3 notes away from a note too.

For example, if we have the Am scale. The 3rd of that scale is C. However, let's pretend that you're playing the note of C and you want to harmonise it with another note. You can harmonise it with a note that is a 3rd above C (but still within the Am scale) which would be E. So E is 3 notes above C, so is a 3rd above it but it's not actually THE 3rd of Am. I hope that makes sense ?


superclear ben!!!! laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif

this will be my post to resolve my doubts!!
rolleyes.gif rolleyes.gif rolleyes.gif rolleyes.gif

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