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> Guitar Reverb And Delay
PosterBoy
post Feb 25 2019, 11:07 AM
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A question to those who record music with a professional finished product in mind.

Would I be correct in saying it's best to record guitars dry and add reverb and delay post tracking unless the delay and reverb is for effect (such as dotted 8th guitar part or really lush spacial reverb effect) rather than just to give it a room feel?


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Mertay
post Feb 25 2019, 11:45 AM
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QUOTE (PosterBoy @ Feb 25 2019, 10:07 AM) *
A question to those who record music with a professional finished product in mind.

Would I be correct in saying it's best to record guitars dry and add reverb and delay post tracking unless the delay and reverb is for effect (such as dotted 8th guitar part or really lush spacial reverb effect) rather than just to give it a room feel?


In a typical home studio production yes.

Keep in mind, you can insert DAW delay/reverbs on the recording channel to get some feel if needed. These won't be recorded with the signal (just like inserting an amp plug-in) and usually are very low on cpu. Professional studios do this too, often a reverb is sent to a vocalists headphone so he/she can perform more naturally but its actually recorded dry.

This is the safe approach and usually preferred with modern genre music. But if something more traditional is in mind (blues, jazz...things usually recorded in almost 1 take), oldschool is preferred where the sound is shaped before recording.


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PosterBoy
post Feb 25 2019, 11:49 AM
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I'm definitely thinking in a more modern scenario where there are more layered arrangements and making sure everything fits well together and making it all sound cohesive.



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Caelumamittendum
post Feb 25 2019, 03:10 PM
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I use the method Mertay described - record dry signal but have effects on for feel, then adjust later for precision.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 25 2019, 04:19 PM
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The same here, Mertay's post is very precise and wise. smile.gif


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klasaine
post Feb 25 2019, 05:42 PM
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For your needs probably best to do it 'post' but if one of your parts is effect dependent then maybe commit to recording the fx. *There's definitely something to be said for making a decision as you record. I almost always do regardless of the style or complexity of the music. I do it because I think my effects sound better than plug ins. YMMV.
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Mertay
post Feb 25 2019, 09:01 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 25 2019, 04:42 PM) *
For your needs probably best to do it 'post' but if one of your parts is effect dependent then maybe commit to recording the fx. *There's definitely something to be said for making a decision as you record. I almost always do regardless of the style or complexity of the music. I do it because I think my effects sound better than plug ins. YMMV.


Thats very understandable as an artist usually aims their stage sound to be as similar as possible to the song. Also there is the fact that although even if the algo/emulation is just as good as the hardware unit (if algo isn't patented), software developers disadvantage is presets or layout design by keeping the artist usage in mind. They reach to their own user base for these but hardware makers spare more time, expertise for such matters.

In that case best is to records as much material as possible before the guitars, even get a good % of the mix done. Then it gets easier to determine the amount/timing etc. of such fx.


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jstcrsn
post Feb 26 2019, 04:12 AM
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record dry or at least a second signal that's dry , these effects can have the guitar sit in front or behind the rest of the band and you won't be able to fix it
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Todd Simpson
post Feb 26 2019, 05:59 AM
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In a pro setup, you often see a dry version recorded at the same time as the amp version. This allows limitless software reamping and you can blend it with the amp/mic tone in the mix.


QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Feb 25 2019, 10:10 AM) *
I use the method Mertay described - record dry signal but have effects on for feel, then adjust later for precision.
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Mertay
post Feb 26 2019, 11:49 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Feb 26 2019, 04:59 AM) *
In a pro setup, you often see a dry version recorded at the same time as the amp version. This allows limitless software reamping and you can blend it with the amp/mic tone in the mix.


Thats ideal, but the splitter must be a good one.

I think it was Phill who tried an affordable unit and it didn't work for him. Boss ls-2 is cool from my experience, it can be used for many other things as well.


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