Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Who Is More Important To Rock Guitar, Hendrix Or Van Halen?
Gabriel Leopardi
post May 8 2019, 04:15 PM
Post #1


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 32.335
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



Who is more important to rock guitar, Hendrix or Van Halen? What do you think?






--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil66
post May 8 2019, 10:40 PM
Post #2


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 6.420
Joined: 5-July 14
From: The Black Country, England
Member No.: 19.975



Tough question Gab, but without Hendrix, Eddie probably wouldn't have picked up the guitar, they both opened the door for the next generation so I'm saying they are equally important wink.gif


--------------------
MY CURRENT REVISION FOLDER HERE


SEE MY GMC CERTIFICATE



“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
Israelmore Ayivor
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post May 9 2019, 02:03 AM
Post #3


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 18.328
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Good question! It's almost like saying which is more important, the chicken or the egg? One probably doesn't happen without the other. So I'd have to say Hendrix for opening up what might be possible on the guitar. He introduced so much that was simply not done before him. It allowed for others to develop ideas that he introduced decades ago.
QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ May 8 2019, 11:15 AM) *
Who is more important to rock guitar, Hendrix or Van Halen? What do you think?




Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post May 9 2019, 02:15 AM
Post #4


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.436
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



Hendrix.
He was really the first one to take full advantage of the "electricness" of the electric guitar. And lets not forget his insane whammy bar use.

Having said that, there are many, including me that say that you have to go all the way back to Andreas Segovia. He was the first real virtuoso on an instrument that was primarily thought of as an instrument only good for 'ladies to play in the parlour' to woo their suitors and by Gypsy's in the Flamenco clubs. Segovia hung out in the Flamenco bars and realized that the guitar could be a powerful concert instrument in the right hands - his hands. He, along with a few Spanish luthiers and some contemporary composers set about to both evolve the instrument as well as the repertoire. The Segovia influence is deep. He changed the guitar as well as how folks regarded it.

This post has been edited by klasaine: May 9 2019, 03:09 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post May 9 2019, 03:58 PM
Post #5


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 32.335
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



QUOTE (Phil66 @ May 8 2019, 06:40 PM) *
Tough question Gab, but without Hendrix, Eddie probably wouldn't have picked up the guitar, they both opened the door for the next generation so I'm saying they are equally important wink.gif



That's true Phil! And who do you think that made Hendrix pick up the guitar? Robert Johnson? Muddy Waters?

QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ May 8 2019, 10:03 PM) *
Good question! It's almost like saying which is more important, the chicken or the egg? One probably doesn't happen without the other. So I'd have to say Hendrix for opening up what might be possible on the guitar. He introduced so much that was simply not done before him. It allowed for others to develop ideas that he introduced decades ago.



That's totally true Todd. I agree mate.

QUOTE (klasaine @ May 8 2019, 10:15 PM) *
Hendrix.
He was really the first one to take full advantage of the "electricness" of the electric guitar. And lets not forget his insane whammy bar use.

Having said that, there are many, including me that say that you have to go all the way back to Andreas Segovia. He was the first real virtuoso on an instrument that was primarily thought of as an instrument only good for 'ladies to play in the parlour' to woo their suitors and by Gypsy's in the Flamenco clubs. Segovia hung out in the Flamenco bars and realized that the guitar could be a powerful concert instrument in the right hands - his hands. He, along with a few Spanish luthiers and some contemporary composers set about to both evolve the instrument as well as the repertoire. The Segovia influence is deep. He changed the guitar as well as how folks regarded it.



I've never been into Segovia's music and influence. I obviously heard flamenco, and surely some of his tunes, but I've never gotten into him. I'll go, thanks for the suggestion!


--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post May 9 2019, 05:24 PM
Post #6


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.436
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ May 9 2019, 07:58 AM) *
That's true Phil! And who do you think that made Hendrix pick up the guitar? Robert Johnson? Muddy Waters?


Hendrix was really into Muddy Waters, Albert King, Elmore James, Bob Dylan (lyrics), the Beatles (song form), Eric Clapton, Johnny Winter, Mike Bloomfield, Curtis Mayfield. He was also totally into the R&B and soul from the 50s and 60s. There are I'm sure many others but in contemporaneous interviews with JH, these are influences he constantly cited.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jstcrsn
post May 9 2019, 08:53 PM
Post #7


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.004
Joined: 29-March 08
From: kansas, USA
Member No.: 4.733



QUOTE (klasaine @ May 9 2019, 02:15 AM) *
Hendrix.
He was really the first one to take full advantage of the "electricness" of the electric guitar. And lets not forget his insane whammy bar use.

Having said that, there are many, including me that say that you have to go all the way back to Andreas Segovia. He was the first real virtuoso on an instrument that was primarily thought of as an instrument only good for 'ladies to play in the parlour' to woo their suitors and by Gypsy's in the Flamenco clubs. Segovia hung out in the Flamenco bars and realized that the guitar could be a powerful concert instrument in the right hands - his hands. He, along with a few Spanish luthiers and some contemporary composers set about to both evolve the instrument as well as the repertoire. The Segovia influence is deep. He changed the guitar as well as how folks regarded it.

studied Him for about a year when I took classical guitar . All of our Idols had theirs and no one would be anywhere without their own idols , we are lucky to live when we are , to see what we have to see , to reach that unreachable star (just kidin)but to have what we have access to , it sort of sad that it flies by so fast but i sure am glad I am watching , even trying to participate from time to time
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil66
post May 9 2019, 10:55 PM
Post #8


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 6.420
Joined: 5-July 14
From: The Black Country, England
Member No.: 19.975



QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ May 9 2019, 02:58 PM) *
That's true Phil! And who do you think that made Hendrix pick up the guitar? Robert Johnson? Muddy Waters?

Probably the early electric blues men like Muddy Waters, BB King, Elmore James etc and even Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry etc.


--------------------
MY CURRENT REVISION FOLDER HERE


SEE MY GMC CERTIFICATE



“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
Israelmore Ayivor
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
verciazghra
post May 10 2019, 02:46 PM
Post #9


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 467
Joined: 10-July 13
Member No.: 18.475



Didn't Tarrega precede segovia?


--------------------
"To achieve great things, two things are needed; a plan, and not quite enough time." -Leonard Bernstein

"The only love affair I have ever had was with music." -Maurice Ravel

"There's no such place as dumb question." -Dose One
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post May 10 2019, 04:06 PM
Post #10


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.436
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (verciazghra @ May 10 2019, 06:46 AM) *
Didn't Tarrega precede segovia?


He did and there were some others, Carulli, Diabelli (Beethoven's editor and publisher), Sor but none, even Tarrega, were as instrumental and successful as Andres Segovia (Torres) in "popularizing" the instrument. He was a rock star in his day. Girls, parties, scandal, virtuosity, excess, etc. - the whole deal. And, as I mentioned, due to his previously unseen and unheard virtuosity on the instrument - contemporaneous composers began to take it more seriously, writing ever more developed works for it and specifically him. AS also set about to expand the repertoire by transcribing a ton of JS Bach, Handel, Vivaldi, Schumann, Chopin, Albeniz, Brahms, etc. for the guitar (none of which had been done before). His Bach transcriptions are standard and mandatory rep for all aspiring classical guitarists. He also worked alongside luthiers' Hauser and Ramirez to develop a louder, more balanced and 'sonorous' instrument. The modern classical as well as steel string dreadnought acoustic guitar are descendants of those early maestro/luthier collaborations. Bottom line: the guitar became louder and was now able to compete with full power opera singers as well as concert instruments and even light percussion. Many historians note that w/o these developments in the actual construction of the acoustic guitar that it may have never gained real popularity as an accompaniment instrument in any style beyond quiet duet chamber concerts. Maybe, maybe not but there is the possibility that w/o Segovia we may have never gotten guitar driven and guitar centric music at all - ?

This post has been edited by klasaine: May 10 2019, 04:49 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil66
post May 10 2019, 08:10 PM
Post #11


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 6.420
Joined: 5-July 14
From: The Black Country, England
Member No.: 19.975



QUOTE (klasaine @ May 10 2019, 03:06 PM) *
He did and there were some others, Carulli, Diabelli (Beethoven's editor and publisher), Sor but none, even Tarrega, were as instrumental and successful as Andres Segovia (Torres) in "popularizing" the instrument. He was a rock star in his day. Girls, parties, scandal, virtuosity, excess, etc. - the whole deal. And, as I mentioned, due to his previously unseen and unheard virtuosity on the instrument - contemporaneous composers began to take it more seriously, writing ever more developed works for it and specifically him. AS also set about to expand the repertoire by transcribing a ton of JS Bach, Handel, Vivaldi, Schumann, Chopin, Albeniz, Brahms, etc. for the guitar (none of which had been done before). His Bach transcriptions are standard and mandatory rep for all aspiring classical guitarists. He also worked alongside luthiers' Hauser and Ramirez to develop a louder, more balanced and 'sonorous' instrument. The modern classical as well as steel string dreadnought acoustic guitar are descendants of those early maestro/luthier collaborations. Bottom line: the guitar became louder and was now able to compete with full power opera singers as well as concert instruments and even light percussion. Many historians note that w/o these developments in the actual construction of the acoustic guitar that it may have never gained real popularity as an accompaniment instrument in any style beyond quiet duet chamber concerts. Maybe, maybe not but there is the possibility that w/o Segovia we may have never gotten guitar driven and guitar centric music at all - ?


Kris,

You should promote Ken to the GMC Music Historical Oracle. Awesome knowledge.

wink.gif


--------------------
MY CURRENT REVISION FOLDER HERE


SEE MY GMC CERTIFICATE



“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
Israelmore Ayivor
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
verciazghra
post May 10 2019, 09:28 PM
Post #12


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 467
Joined: 10-July 13
Member No.: 18.475



I second this statement! That were some hard hitting golden nuggets of history right there. Thanks for the lesson Ken!
QUOTE (Phil66 @ May 10 2019, 07:10 PM) *
Kris,

You should promote Ken to the GMC Music Historical Oracle. Awesome knowledge.

wink.gif



--------------------
"To achieve great things, two things are needed; a plan, and not quite enough time." -Leonard Bernstein

"The only love affair I have ever had was with music." -Maurice Ravel

"There's no such place as dumb question." -Dose One
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post May 11 2019, 04:58 AM
Post #13


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.436
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



biggrin.gif biggrin.gif
You guys know I like history.
Anyway ...
One of the the most notable aspects of both Hendrix and Van Halen is that once they appeared on the scene, they changed guitar for ever after. Every serious guitarist regardless of style had to get at least a little bit of JH and EVH under their hands and into their musical vocabulary and musical psyche if they wanted to work.

*I still think that Jimi is ultimately more influential because along with guitar playing, he also changed music and culture.

This post has been edited by klasaine: May 11 2019, 10:36 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post May 14 2019, 03:24 AM
Post #14


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 32.335
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



QUOTE (klasaine @ May 11 2019, 12:58 AM) *
biggrin.gif biggrin.gif
You guys know I like history.
Anyway ...
One of the the most notable aspects of both Hendrix and Van Halen is that once they appeared on the scene, they changed guitar for ever after. Every serious guitarist regardless of style had to get at least a little bit of JH and EVH under their hands and into their musical vocabulary and musical psyche if they wanted to work.

*I still think that Jimi is ultimately more influential because along with guitar playing, he also changed music and culture.



I totally agree.


--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
AK Rich
post May 16 2019, 06:15 PM
Post #15


Learning Guitar Hero
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.969
Joined: 10-September 11
From: Big Lake, Alaska
Member No.: 13.839



An interesting article I was reading recently about Hendrix with many comments from other people in the business.
https://www.guitarplayer.com/miscellaneous/hendrix-at-70
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post May 20 2019, 04:46 PM
Post #16


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 32.335
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



QUOTE (AK Rich @ May 16 2019, 02:15 PM) *
An interesting article I was reading recently about Hendrix with many comments from other people in the business.
https://www.guitarplayer.com/miscellaneous/hendrix-at-70



Cool! Thanks for sharing!!


--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 20th July 2019 - 10:50 PM