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Todd Simpson
post Nov 26 2018, 10:35 PM
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If you don't plan on micing your amp any time soon, you really don't need a mic. If you want to record vocals, for whatever reason, a mic is handy smile.gif But if you don't plan to do that, then you don['t need one.
Everyone is spot on, stick with the scarlett. It does everything you need in one box.
Todd
QUOTE (Adam M @ Nov 26 2018, 05:14 PM) *
I imagine I won't be using more than 2 inputs. I kind of want to try miking an amp but after reading Phil's comment I don't think it will happen anytime soon.


Thank you for clearing that up for me. I suppose that settles all doubts I had. Scarlett it is, then smile.gif


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Nov 26 2018, 10:36 PM


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Phil66
post Nov 27 2018, 08:51 AM
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QUOTE (Adam M @ Nov 26 2018, 10:14 PM) *
Thank you for clearing that up for me. I suppose that settles all doubts I had. Scarlett it is, then smile.gif


Glad to be of help. I have limited knowledge with recording but I do have a lot of experience with trying lots of different things in the early stages. The issue with using a mic is you'll be forever looking for the sweet spot regarding position, you'll spend more time trying to find that than playing your guitar.

You'll have enough on your plate working out Reaper and Scarlett Mix Control. Maybe try a mic at a later date.

Always remember there are a lot of HotKey settings in Reaper that are very useful, you can leave that for a while though but, when you start to think, "I wish I could do.........." you probably can in Reaper, it's very customisable and the Cockos Reaper forum as well as here is the place to go.

Enjoy learning it all. but I did speak a lot with the lads here when I was setting up my home recording, I wanted two mics, direct wet and dry recording, reamping etc. DOn't do that, take small steps just be sure to get the right interface to suit future needs. I use the 1st gen 818i8, I have my Helix L/R xlrs going into it and straight out of the speakers and I record direct using the USB allowing wet and dry and reamping. This way I get zero latency because I direct feed to my speakers from the Helix.

Cheers

Phil




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greenlabelseo
post Dec 5 2018, 03:42 PM
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If you have a bit more money to spend. I would recommend UAD Arrow audio interface. The sound that comes out from this little beast is a whole new level when compared to Scarlet. Scarlet is awesome but it doesn't give you that "real" feel and dynamics like Arrow does. Another good thing is that it comes with tons of plugins. Marshall Plexi, Fender Tweed and many more.
So, I would recommend to check it out (i'm not affiliated with them in any way, just sharing good stuff).

I'm also seeing it listed #1 on many audio interface reviews, like this one https://guitargeary.com/best-audio-interfaces-guitar/

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Todd Simpson
post Dec 5 2018, 07:31 PM
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The UA is a great device to be sure. It's about double the price though. For those who don't know about the UA devices, they use internal hardware to run plugins that only work with a UA accellerator device like this one attached to your system. The plugins sound amazing. I'd say they sound better than just about any plugins I've ever heard. However, one is tied to the platform as the plugins require the hardware so it's something to keep in mind. Also, the cost difference is not slight. For someone getting their first interface, it may be a bit much. Still, in the end it comes down to the user. If you get one of these, and don't like it, or don't like the scarlett you can always return it and get something else. Just buy it new and get it from a vendor who does returns.

Todd
QUOTE (greenlabelseo @ Dec 5 2018, 10:42 AM) *
If you have a bit more money to spend. I would recommend UAD Arrow audio interface. The sound that comes out from this little beast is a whole new level when compared to Scarlet. Scarlet is awesome but it doesn't give you that "real" feel and dynamics like Arrow does. Another good thing is that it comes with tons of plugins. Marshall Plexi, Fender Tweed and many more.
So, I would recommend to check it out (i'm not affiliated with them in any way, just sharing good stuff).

I'm also seeing it listed #1 on many audio interface reviews, like this one https://guitargeary.com/best-audio-interfaces-guitar/


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Mertay
post Dec 5 2018, 08:42 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Dec 5 2018, 06:31 PM) *
...


Not long ago I went to friends friend to give a short recording/DAW use lesson. He had that soundcard as a beginner, started teaching the soundcard first and the internal mixer was also needed to be thought.

So yeah, great soundcard but not really a beginners device. If I'd have to give an alternative (and though I still haven't got my hands on one yet) audient soundcards can be considered. They rave the converters but more importantly it has a j-fet di input so a guitar player can really drive the preamp to get a better feel/response from amp sim.s.


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Adam M
post Dec 5 2018, 10:29 PM
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QUOTE (greenlabelseo @ Dec 5 2018, 02:42 PM) *
If you have a bit more money to spend. I would recommend UAD Arrow audio interface. The sound that comes out from this little beast is a whole new level when compared to Scarlet. Scarlet is awesome but it doesn't give you that "real" feel and dynamics like Arrow does. Another good thing is that it comes with tons of plugins. Marshall Plexi, Fender Tweed and many more.
So, I would recommend to check it out (i'm not affiliated with them in any way, just sharing good stuff).

I'm also seeing it listed #1 on many audio interface reviews, like this one https://guitargeary.com/best-audio-interfaces-guitar/


I won't be able to buy anything more expensive than Scarlett for a while. I'm on a tight budget currently. I might have to replace nut in my Avion and few other things stacked up. As far as I know, it will be good enough for me. But if I decide for upgrade in few years, I'll keep my eyes on Arrow smile.gif
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Todd Simpson
post Dec 8 2018, 06:48 AM
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I just saw your signal path info which I had been digging around for!!!

You are using the scarlett to allow wet/dry recording it seems? Did you know that you can do all of that just with the helix and usb? You can assign a wet stereo out to say track 1 and then assign a pure clean tone to say track 2 in your daw, just using the Helix. It will let you output to separate tracks with one being an effected tone and one being completely dry. it's built for it. I do the same with my 11 rack. Also, you can assign different outputs on the helix itself. E.G Quarter inch output for your heaphone mix, and xlr out for your monitors. You can control all this via the

I think I remember you saying you had the native helix plugin? In which case you can use the helix to record just a dry tone if you like and use the helix native to have any tone you like which you can change at any point. This is the most powerful way to record as it gives the most flexibility and ease of use. At that point, the helix is just acting as a simple audio interface recording over usb. I can crank the samples on Logic to the point where my round trip latency is 6.8 Milliseconds. At that point, it's nothing that I can hear even shredding at full clip. So I use plugins (overloud) for all guitar recording typically. That way monitor and my headphone mix are on a separate output from my iconnectivity 4+ which has it's own knob on the front for quick volume changes.

I don't know if any of this is helping but I hope it is wink.gif

Todd


QUOTE (Phil66 @ Nov 27 2018, 03:51 AM) *
Glad to be of help. I have limited knowledge with recording but I do have a lot of experience with trying lots of different things in the early stages. The issue with using a mic is you'll be forever looking for the sweet spot regarding position, you'll spend more time trying to find that than playing your g
Phil


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