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> Quick Licks #108 - Alternate Picking With Pull Offs
Todd Simpson
post Nov 30 2019, 11:06 PM
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In this Quick Licks we work on our picking and our pull offs at the same time. You can BAR the B and E string if you like. Just keep your mute strong so that it doesn't sound like a chord. It's very tough to keep this from happening so don't beat yourself up about it. A bit of spill is ok, just try to keep it as separated as possible. Don't overthink it or over practice it. This is a quick lick!!

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Phil66
post Dec 1 2019, 09:13 PM
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Take 1 Sarge,

I played it at a comfortable speed and then slowed down and took to where I fail. I hope it's ok, I just thought you might spot what happens when I start to fail at "speed".

https://youtu.be/A65I7f91vo0


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 2 2019, 11:34 PM
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You got it! Did you notice how hard it was to keep more than one note from ringing using the bar method? I used the bar method too but it's not in the tab as one can play it any way one likes. Still it's quite tough. it goes back to using the striking hand to mute to keep things clean. yet another example of how left hand muting doesn't always work well enough and even using both sometimes isn't quite enough. It's nearly impossible to prevent a little bleed on this one. You gave a valiant effort and you are, as usual, the first one out of the gate. Did you notice that this is yet another strike one string twice then strike or hammer the second string twice? That one picking pattern is the basis for tons of my licks. Once you get that picking pattern down, you can do a lot with it. Well played!!

It's your practice on this type of lick to this point that I see coming through on this lick. A year ago this lick may have seemed like a serious challenge. Now I think you handle it with grace and style.


You just...
LEVELED UP!!!

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Todd


QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 1 2019, 04:13 PM) *
Take 1 Sarge,
I played it at a comfortable speed and then slowed down and took to where I fail. I hope it's ok, I just thought you might spot what happens when I start to fail at "speed".

https://youtu.be/A65I7f91vo0


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Dec 2 2019, 11:52 PM
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Phil66
post Dec 3 2019, 10:02 AM
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Thanks Todd,

It is a struggle to bar and keep everything quiet but the bar seems the most economical.

I think I'm picking things up a bit quicker now, in part because I had a moment of clarity a while back, now I don't try as hard, and I don't mean that in a negative way, but, to use an analogy in motorcycle racing, if you try too hard you end up falling off, I realised that you have to earn it and that takes time and if you don't have much time then it has to take the time it takes to earn it and it must not be measured in days. One of Vai's school holiday practise days is equivalent to two weeks for me, even a school day practise for him is a week for me so, I now take a Que será, será approach and since I've stopped beating myself up about lack of progress and started thinking that I'm not doing too bad given my life/time restraints I seem to be progressing a little more quickly.

"And where does this new thinking come from Phil?" you may be thinking, well watch Paul's answer to the Captain's question at 20:50. Paul seems almost offended, as though the Captain has belittled his skill. The Captain crawls back though laugh.gif The question and the answer that changed my mind set is >>>HERE<<<, and those three words spoken by Paul had a BIG impact on me in more ways that one.The whole interview is very inspiring and a big eye opener, for me anyway. It made me realise that no matter how easy Paul, Vai, you, Gab, Kris and all of the instructors at GMC make it look, they have bloody earned it with blood sweat and tears. Masters make their craft look easy which is why people take things up as a hobby, how long they stick at once the going gets tough is down to their strength of will.
https://youtu.be/1PxX7plLKIc


Cheers

Phil

This post has been edited by Phil66: Dec 3 2019, 09:12 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 3 2019, 10:16 AM
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Well freaking said sir. That's the thing that sooooooooo many just can't seem to grasp. Watching a player/artist with 10,000 plus hours of practice at pretty much anything, is going to be able to make it look pretty easy. All the viewer sees is the result. Watching 10k hours of practice would not make for fun watching. There is a lot of bad playing in that 10k hours. As you say, it's about will. The simple will not to quit. Above all other things, that is what matters most. Along the way you will pick up various things that make you the player you were meant to be.
You are picking up things faster these days btw. It's part of your journey and it's good to see. As you learn more and more about how you learn best, the speed of pickup will continue to increase. That's perhaps the most difficult part that nobody seems to talk about. We all learn in a little different way and learning how we learn is something that is an integral part of the journey itself. As you know I was told by several instructors that I would never play guitar and that I should abandon music an try fingerpainting or anything that required very little small muscle control. Well, I not only play on recordings from musicians from all over the globe but I've been teaching other people to play for nearly two decades now. Guitar, like everything in life, comes down to sheer will. It comes down to earning it. smile.gif

Todd
QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 3 2019, 05:02 AM) *
Thanks Todd,

It is a struggle to bar and keep everything quiet but the bar seems the most economical.

I think I'm picking things up a bit quicker now, in part because I had a moment of clarity a while back, now don't try as hard, and I don't mean that in a negative way, but, to use an analogy in motorcycle racing, if you try too hard you end up falling off, I realised that you have to earn it and that takes time and if you don't have much time then it has to take the time it takes to earn it and it must not be measured in days. One of Vai's school holiday practise days is equivalent to two weeks for me, even a school day practise for him is a week for me so, I now take a Que será, será approach and since I've stopped beating myself up about lack of progress and started thinking that I'm not doing too bad given my life/time restraints I seem to be progressing a little more quickly.

"And where does this new thinking come from Phil?" you may be thinking, well watch Paul's answer to the Captain's question at 20:50. Paul seems almost offended, as though the Captain has belittled his skill. The Captain crawls back though laugh.gif The question and the answer that changed my mind set is >>>HERE<<<, and those three words spoken by Paul had a BIG impact on me in more ways that one.The whole interview is very inspiring and a big eye opener, for me anyway. It made me realise that no matter how easy Paul, Vai, you, Gab, Kris and all of the instructors at GMC make it look, they have bloody earned it with blood sweat and tears. Masters make their craft look easy which is why people take things up as a hobby, how long they stick at once the going gets tough is down to their strength of will.
https://youtu.be/1PxX7plLKIc


Cheers

Phil


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Dec 3 2019, 10:36 AM
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klasaine
post Dec 4 2019, 07:41 PM
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The difficult part of this one for me was realizing that I needed to mute my low E string with my (left hand) thumb.
Because we're playing all these Es, As and Bs - there's a lot of potential for open string harmonics to ring. My low E was the worst offender.

Right hand picking isn't strict alternate because after I hit the B on the first string and pull-off to A with a down stroke I come back to the two Es with a down stroke. ∨ ∧ ∨ pull-off ∨ ∧ ∨ pull-off etc. You can clearly see it when I play the lick slowly.

Other than the distortion and the severe muting, I play stuff similar to this pretty frequently. Not necessarily as a focus point but embedded somewhere in a line or a lick. To get it clean and tight took me about a 1/2 hour solid.
*One of things that helps me play these 'licks' is that I will immediately incorporate it into something else and/or make a little song utilizing the technique in different spots on the neck or different string sets. Putting it into a musical context makes me want to work on it.

For your consideration ...

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Phil66
post Dec 4 2019, 08:04 PM
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It really is great to see you doing these Ken, I'm enjoying reading your insights and how you approach them and the fact that you do have small struggles makes me feel better about my struggles. Thanks for being part of this buddy wink.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 4 2019, 09:54 PM
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I agree with Phill, it's great to see you doing these and you always have unique insights when playing them that are always helpful. You did seem like this one was something that you could play naturally, like it's a type of lick that you've used before.

This lick is really tricky to keep clean in terms of note bleed. The muting has to be pretty stiff or one runs the risk of it sounding almost like a chord when the finger bar is holding 2 notes. You keep it separated at speed quite well.
That's part of what makes this one so tricky. Not to mention the passive resonance trying to make the other strings ring smile.gif Well played yet again and you just..
LEVELED UP!!!!!!
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Todd
QUOTE (klasaine @ Dec 4 2019, 02:41 PM) *
The difficult part of this one for me was realizing that I needed to mute my low E string with my (left hand) thumb.
Because we're playing all these Es, As and Bs - there's a lot of potential for open string harmonics to ring. My low E was the worst offender.

Right hand picking isn't strict alternate because after I hit the B on the first string and pull-off to A with a down stroke I come back to the two Es with a down stroke. ∨ ∧ ∨ pull-off ∨ ∧ ∨ pull-off etc. You can clearly see it when I play the lick slowly.

Other than the distortion and the severe muting, I play stuff similar to this pretty frequently. Not necessarily as a focus point but embedded somewhere in a line or a lick. To get it clean and tight took me about a 1/2 hour solid.
*One of things that helps me play these 'licks' is that I will immediately incorporate it into something else and/or make a little song utilizing the technique in different spots on the neck or different string sets. Putting it into a musical context makes me want to work on it.

For your consideration ...

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