Speed Runs For Intermediates
Ken Slocum
Jun 3 2018, 02:06 AM
Learning Apprentice Player
Posts: 59
Joined: 28-February 15
From: Spokane, Washington
I am currently working on the lesson "Speed Runs for Intermediates" and I have a quick question. The lesson starts out Playing the A minor scale over the A minor chord. But when the chord changes to a F Major, the scale switches to a C Major Scale starting on the F note. I guess I do not understand why this works. Unless I am mistaking and this is not a C Major scale starting on measure 5. PS....Really enjoy the lessons, Thanks.

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Caelumamittendum
Jun 3 2018, 04:36 AM
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Joined: 14-June 08
From: Odense, Denmark
1st off, the scale of A natural minor is the same as C major.
If we build chords from these scales we get the chords: C major, D minor, E minor, F major, G major, A minor and B minor b5.

This means the C major/A natural minor scale can work over any of these chords, however you will notice it gives a different "flavor" depending on which chord is being played underneath.

When we start looking at combining chords and scales we can more clearly hear the so called modes: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian.

The modes in a given key (such as C major) all have the same notes, but they start on different ones:

Ionian: C D E F G A B C
Dorian: D E F G A B C D
Phrygian: E F G A B C D E
...and so one, it's just moved one note at a time.

This is of course in C major, and if we were to explain the modes of all keys, we would be talking not in letters, but in numbers. I will not go into that now.

You may notice that starting the C major scale on the F gives a so lydian feel. It can be tricky to hear this at first and to remember them may be even harder, but with time it will come.

Now, going into the numbers, here's a good chart:



At some point you might feel up to working out the modes starting on the same note:

C Ionian: C D E F G A B C
C Dorian: C D Eb F G A Bb
C Phrygian: C Db Eb F G Ab Bb C
And so on...

What you may do is play a drone note (i.e. have a person play a low C note, or record one) and practice this scales to hear the difference.

I think I may have caused more confusion now. biggrin.gif

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Gabriel Leopardi
Jun 3 2018, 06:31 PM
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Awesome explanation Cael!! Ken let us know if you understand this interesting concept.

You can find more info about modes here: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=48825

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Caelumamittendum
Jun 3 2018, 06:50 PM
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I hope I explained it somewhat correctly, Gabriel smile.gif Let me know if it's okay

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Ken Slocum
Jun 3 2018, 07:18 PM
Learning Apprentice Player
Posts: 59
Joined: 28-February 15
From: Spokane, Washington
QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Jun 3 2018, 10:50 AM) *
I hope I explained it somewhat correctly, Gabriel smile.gif Let me know if it's okay


Thank You for the explanation. I noticed in the lesson that when we switch to the G chord we are again playing the C Major scale starting on the G note. Your explanation was excellent. I realized that the notes played in the C Major are the same notes in A Minor. I guess when you throw in the intervals and what note you start on clearly reflects the differences in their tone.

I am going to take your suggestion and use a drone track and go over the scales and modes. Thanks Gabriel for the link. You guys are the best.

Again, Thank You. It is an amazing instrument and the learning never stops. I love it!


QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Jun 3 2018, 10:31 AM) *
Awesome explanation Cael!! Ken let us know if you understand this interesting concept.

You can find more info about modes here: https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=48825


Thanks Gabriel for the link. I am checking it out now. The more I learn the easier it is to understand.

You are at GuitarMasterClass.net


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Gabriel Leopardi
Jun 3 2018, 08:00 PM
Instructor
Posts: 35.528
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Jun 3 2018, 02:50 PM) *
I hope I explained it somewhat correctly, Gabriel smile.gif Let me know if it's okay



Yes, it's clear and complete!

QUOTE (Ken Slocum @ Jun 3 2018, 03:18 PM) *
Thank You for the explanation. I noticed in the lesson that when we switch to the G chord we are again playing the C Major scale starting on the G note. Your explanation was excellent. I realized that the notes played in the C Major are the same notes in A Minor. I guess when you throw in the intervals and what note you start on clearly reflects the differences in their tone.


It's not only the starting note what make it sound special, you need to identify which are the characteristic notes that give the mode that specific feel or sound and what makes it different. The threads that I've shared goes deeper with this concept.

The part where Cael talks about parallel modes (C Ionian, C Dorian, C Phrygian, etc) is great to compare the structure of each mode and notice the difference. Two parallel modes share the same root but have a different structure.

Check this video, the info here is pure gold since you'll be able to understand and hear the differences:



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Todd Simpson
Jun 4 2018, 02:48 AM
GMC:er
Posts: 23.675
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Nailed it!!!
QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Jun 2 2018, 11:36 PM) *
1st off, the scale of A natural minor is the same as C major.
If we build chords from these scales we get the chords: C major, D minor, E minor, F major, G major, A minor and B minor b5.

This means the C major/A natural minor scale can work over any of these chords, however you will notice it gives a different "flavor" depending on which chord is being played underneath.

When we start looking at combining chords and scales we can more clearly hear the so called modes: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian.

The modes in a given key (such as C major) all have the same notes, but they start on different ones:

Ionian: C D E F G A B C
Dorian: D E F G A B C D
Phrygian: E F G A B C D E
...and so one, it's just moved one note at a time.

This is of course in C major, and if we were to explain the modes of all keys, we would be talking not in letters, but in numbers. I will not go into that now.

You may notice that starting the C major scale on the F gives a so lydian feel. It can be tricky to hear this at first and to remember them may be even harder, but with time it will come.

Now, going into the numbers, here's a good chart:



At some point you might feel up to working out the modes starting on the same note:

C Ionian: C D E F G A B C
C Dorian: C D Eb F G A Bb
C Phrygian: C Db Eb F G Ab Bb C
And so on...

What you may do is play a drone note (i.e. have a person play a low C note, or record one) and practice this scales to hear the difference.

I think I may have caused more confusion now. biggrin.gif

You are at GuitarMasterClass.net


Don't miss today's free lick. Plus all our lessons are packed with free content!

Don't miss today's free blues, jazz & country licks. Plus all our lessons are packed with free content!
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