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> Quick Licks #109 - String Skipping Blues Lick
Todd Simpson
post Dec 7 2019, 09:24 PM
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In this Quick Lick we use String Skipping with a traditional Blues Style Lick. It requires that you keep a solid mute and that you use the third finger to fret 2 notes on different strings at different times that are vertically adjacent. So it's pretty tricky as far as Blues Licks go. It still sounds like a standard blues lick, it's just a bit trickier to play. Give it a whirl!


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Phil66
post Dec 7 2019, 09:57 PM
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Take 1 Sarge

https://youtu.be/tlaPiPlmY78


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 7 2019, 10:05 PM
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BINGO!!! You nailed it. I didn't know you were adept at string skipping! Some folks really have trouble string skipping. Not you! Also there is that vertical finger thing where the notes are on the same fret but different strings so you have to switch pressure on a single finger to hit it. You got that sorted as well! NICE!! You sir just..
LEVELED UP!!!!
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QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 7 2019, 04:57 PM) *
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Phil66
post Dec 7 2019, 10:19 PM
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Thanks Todd,

I didn't know I was adept at string skipping laugh.gif

I'm going to put that into an improv as soon as.

Cheers

This post has been edited by Phil66: Dec 7 2019, 11:46 PM


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klasaine
post Dec 8 2019, 01:39 AM
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I play stuff like this all the time but I've never actually played that exact Todd lick, so what I did, as I do with anything new, is turn it into a song which makes me play it over and over again in a musical way. *Not really important but I also turn them into 1/16 notes and start on the and of beat two.

I illustrate my process on this video.



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Todd Simpson
post Dec 8 2019, 04:14 AM
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Perfect! Nailed the lick and then put it in a musical context right away. This is the best way to go about it imho. Once one get's a lick down, doing something with it musically is the ideal way to make it part of one's personal lick library. Your riffage was spot on and perfectly in keeping with the vibe of the riff. I should have known you'd have no trouble with it smile.gif I started hearing a solo as soon as you started playing the riff version. The solo meets up with the riff during that lick and matches it an octave up then a harmony up etc. Would make a very cool backing to solo over. It really does have a SRV quality to it. It would work great with a good jazz/blues drummer who was a pinch busy in terms of fills and brass. Anyhoo! you RAWK!!! Also, you just..
LEVELED UP!!!
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Dec 7 2019, 08:39 PM) *
I play stuff like this all the time but I've never actually played that exact Todd lick, so what I did, as I do with anything new, is turn it into a song which makes me play it over and over again in a musical way. *Not really important but I also turn them into 1/16 notes and start on the and of beat two.

I illustrate my process on this video.

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Phil66
post Dec 8 2019, 11:02 AM
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Brilliant Ken,

Thank you for sharing. I need to build the knowledge to be able to do that, I've worked out its in G major by googling "Which key has one sharp" but I wouldn't know which chords I could play along with the lick other than G major, I think unsure.gif

That's the kind of thing I've always wanted to do but understanding theory is the bane of my life, it just doesn't stick in my head. Creating music is harder than playing other people's stuff, there are many good instrument players, not so many music makers, I guess that's why there are so many covers /tribute bands.

That was very inspiring Ken, I could really hear SRV but I also heard hints of Black Dog in the delivery.

I think most of us learn them and forget them without putting into anything life you did there, I'm wondering if Todd could maybe give a couple of Chardstock ideas to go with the lick? What you say Todd? Time permitting of course.

Cheers gentlemen.

Phil


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 8 2019, 09:09 PM
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At the risk of being confusing, it's one sharp is also E Minor. The lick "root", where it resolves, and the last note, is an E. Ken's riffing is also in E. E is one of my fave keys to play in since you get two open strings that are both root notes. High and low open E string smile.gif Here is the E Minor Pentatonic scale mapped over 12 frets. It just repeats at the 12th fret on the neck.
Use this as a guide and just land on an E (highlighted) to resolve your licks now and then smile.gif
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QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 8 2019, 06:02 AM) *
Brilliant Ken,

Thank you for sharing. I need to build the knowledge to be able to do that, I've worked out its in G major by googling "Which key has one sharp" but I wouldn't know which chords I could play along with the lick other than G major, I think unsure.gif

That's the kind of thing I've always wanted to do but understanding theory is the bane of my life, it just doesn't stick in my head. Creating music is harder than playing other people's stuff, there are many good instrument players, not so many music makers, I guess that's why there are so many covers /tribute bands.

That was very inspiring Ken, I could really hear SRV but I also heard hints of Black Dog in the delivery.

I think most of us learn them and forget them without putting into anything life you did there, I'm wondering if Todd could maybe give a couple of Chardstock ideas to go with the lick? What you say Todd? Time permitting of course.

Cheers gentlemen.

Phil
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Phil66
post Dec 8 2019, 09:28 PM
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Thanks Todd,

I'm not confused by the "E minor" comment, I understand that each major key has a relative minor, like all of the white keys on the piano are C major or A minor depending on where you start, isn't that kinda getting into modes too? I don't want to go there just yet though laugh.gif

What Ken did there was something I've always wanted to be able to do, understand just enough about keys and chords to make something up on the fly, obviously one's creativity comes in to it in a BIG way. Thing is if someone said to me "Let's jam in C major" I wouldn't have a clue, I'd guess a C major progression could be C>F>G but I wouldn't know if they were to be major or minor chords, I hazard a guess that each chord should have no sharps/flats?

Sorry to ask so many questions, and sorry to bring this into QL, maybe we could take it up somewhere else.

I could do with a theory course that isn't just waffle waffle waffle, but applied, and very very gradual learning curve that could be tackled in 10-15 minutes a day, small but many chunks.

As I said before, it must be the reason there are so many covers/tribute bands. Playing well is one thing, creating is a whole other level.

Sorry Todd, we should leave this for now and maybe one day Kris will sanction a steady theory course wink.gif I've delved into the theory section from time to time but it's overwhelming. I've even looked for courses at local colleges but there aren't any sad.gif I just like to understand what i do wink.gif

Cheers

Phil


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 9 2019, 01:55 AM
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No worries smile.gif I'd say the trick is to keep it simple. So like you mentioned, if someone said lets jam in C major, the easiest way would be to pick the first three notes of the C major scale and play a power chord on each and just turn it in to a riff. Then one could solo in C major and it would sound right smile.gif It can get complicated of course if one gets jazzy and starts using non power chords. You'll get there, but for a start I think you know more than you think you do on theory just from what you've written. For blues/rock stuff, power chords are plenty to be honest. Making up some backing tracks is a great way to start learning this kind of stuff. It happens organically along the way. I think you mentioned you were not ready to make backings but I honestly thing you seem ready. Start simple, make a backing bit that will loop, put it on loop in your daw and then do what mertay said and listen for a melody line that wants to be played. Somtimes you will hear it in your head, sometimes, you have to just put your hands on the guitar and find the melody line.

Your app sounds fund btw! Whats it called?

Todd
QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 8 2019, 04:28 PM) *
Thanks Todd,

I'm not confused by the "E minor" comment, I understand that each major key has a relative minor, like all of the white keys on the piano are C major or A minor depending on where you start, isn't that kinda getting into modes too? I don't want to go there just yet though laugh.gif

What Ken did there was something I've always wanted to be able to do, understand just enough about keys and chords to make something up on the fly, obviously one's creativity comes in to it in a BIG way. Thing is if someone said to me "Let's jam in C major" I wouldn't have a clue, I'd guess a C major progression could be C>F>G but I wouldn't know if they were to be major or minor chords, I hazard a guess that each chord should have no sharps/flats?

Sorry to ask so many questions, and sorry to bring this into QL, maybe we could take it up somewhere else.

I could do with a theory course that isn't just waffle waffle waffle, but applied, and very very gradual learning curve that could be tackled in 10-15 minutes a day, small but many chunks.

As I said before, it must be the reason there are so many covers/tribute bands. Playing well is one thing, creating is a whole other level.

Sorry Todd, we should leave this for now and maybe one day Kris will sanction a steady theory course wink.gif I've delved into the theory section from time to time but it's overwhelming. I've even looked for courses at local colleges but there aren't any sad.gif I just like to understand what i do wink.gif

Cheers

Phil
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Phil66
post Dec 9 2019, 08:35 AM
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Thanks Todd,

The app is called "Guitar Notes" by All Your Base Games.

Cheers

Phil


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klasaine
post Dec 9 2019, 04:26 PM
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Here's how I came up with the key of E chord progression.
The last note of the riff is an E and it sounds 'final'. Most of the time it's that simple. In this case, and based on experience, I picked an E major blues progression but I could've just as easily picked E minor.

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Phil66
post Dec 9 2019, 08:42 PM
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Thanks Ken

You see, that's where I get confused, E major has no G in it wheres E minor does, how can you use each?

Cheers

Phil


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AK Rich
post Dec 9 2019, 09:53 PM
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It's amazing how many riffs over the ages have been born out of that little box.
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klasaine
post Dec 9 2019, 11:29 PM
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QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 9 2019, 12:42 PM) *
Thanks Ken

You see, that's where I get confused, E major has no G in it wheres E minor does, how can you use each?

Cheers

Phil


There is a VERY long academic discussion we could get into but suffice to say our western ears have just gotten used to hearing a minor third against a major chord, especially in regard to blues, jazz and rock. Familiarity. File under 'if it sounds good, it is good'.
*It is a bit more difficult to make the major 3rd (a G# in this case) work over a minor chord or minor chord progression. But again that's another discussion.


QUOTE (AK Rich @ Dec 9 2019, 01:53 PM) *
It's amazing how many riffs over the ages have been born out of that little box.


True dat.

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Todd Simpson
post Dec 10 2019, 02:14 AM
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Very true!!!!! It's amazing how much music is built on very simple bones/structure and still sounds great.
QUOTE (AK Rich @ Dec 9 2019, 04:53 PM) *
It's amazing how many riffs over the ages have been born out of that little box.


Thanks! I'm gonna give it a whirl smile.gif

QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 9 2019, 03:35 AM) *
Thanks Todd,

The app is called "Guitar Notes" by All Your Base Games.

Cheers

Phil
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Phil66
post Dec 10 2019, 08:27 AM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Dec 9 2019, 10:29 PM) *
There is a VERY long academic discussion we could get into but suffice to say our western ears have just gotten used to hearing a minor third against a major chord, especially in regard to blues, jazz and rock. Familiarity. File under 'if it sounds good, it is good'.
*It is a bit more difficult to make the major 3rd (a G# in this case) work over a minor chord or minor chord progression. But again that's another discussion.


Thank Ken,

We'd better stop it now, Todd will court marshall us for going off topic biggrin.gif Last thing I'll say is if one has a bad ear, everything could sound good to them, then when someone with a good ear listens it's "aaaarrrrghhhhh that's awful" I've played things without realising I was playing the pentatonic two frets down from where it "should" have been, never noticed, sounded good to me, until Gab pulled me up on it. That was a while back, maybe it wouldn't happen now.

We need to sit down over some good food and wine and discuss theory over feeling until the cows come home, not theory per se, but more bending and breaking the "rules", and how and when and why wink.gif

Cheers

Phil


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 10 2019, 04:48 PM
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Im ok with it smile.gif It's a thread for learning so it's still on topic. I"m sure there will be more threads and more quick licks smile.gif
QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 10 2019, 03:27 AM) *
Thank Ken,

We'd better stop it now, Todd will court marshall us for going off topic biggrin.gif Last thing I'll say is if one has a bad ear, everything could sound good to them, then when someone with a good ear listens it's "aaaarrrrghhhhh that's awful" I've played things without realising I was playing the pentatonic two frets down from where it "should" have been, never noticed, sounded good to me, until Gab pulled me up on it. That was a while back, maybe it wouldn't happen now.

We need to sit down over some good food and wine and discuss theory over feeling until the cows come home, not theory per se, but more bending and breaking the "rules", and how and when and why wink.gif

Cheers

Phil
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