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> Finger Pressure
Phil66
post Jul 16 2019, 08:59 PM
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Hello folks,

Whenever I play chords I get pitch issues due to finger pressure. The problem is, my hand isn't relaxed enough when making the chord shape and I think, subconsciously I'm fretting hard to make the fretboard stop my fingers from springing back to their "home" position. It's like holding an unfamiliar yoga position I guess, not that I do yoga biggrin.gif but I guess people strain to hold position and tend to strain.

When I watch Ken (Klassaine) play chords, his fingers look so so relaxed whereas mine are like the hands of someone in a rage.

I know the word "practise" will appear but any tips on how to keep the hand relaxed particularly when playing dominant 7 barre chords will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks folks.


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Caelumamittendum
post Jul 16 2019, 09:34 PM
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I'm just brainstorming here.

Can you relax and tense your hand without the guitar? And how so with the guitar with certain chords or positions? I remember certain things have made me tense up and I try to be aware of it and do the same motion without tensing up. Rinse and repeat till it feels more natural without tension.


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Phil66
post Jul 16 2019, 09:47 PM
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Thanks for your message Ben, the only way I can describe it is if you hold your hand spread as wide as you possibly can, that's how mine feels when fretting barre chords, if you put your spread hand on a table it can relax and hold position due to the friction. This is what I think it's causing my pitch issues, I have to press down to lock the hand in position.

Cheers smile.gif


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Caelumamittendum
post Jul 17 2019, 08:26 AM
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Just throwing this in here as well:



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klasaine
post Jul 17 2019, 11:29 AM
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Not sure if this will be of any help, but for me, it's all about control and not strength. Your hand is absolutely strong enough to hold a barre chord. The trick is distributing that strength and pressure evenly. Especially between your thumb, the first finger and across the top of your hand. If you feel too much pressure in any of these 3 areas, back it off a bit.

Another thing I do that helps me change chords smoothly is that I always visualize one step ahead. And I mean I really visualize the next move as in I see my hand on the fretboard making that next chord.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jul 17 2019, 11:30 AM
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Phil66
post Jul 17 2019, 12:14 PM
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Thanks Ben and Ken,

I'm okay with E shape barre chords, it's the dominant 7 especially the version that uses the pinky on the B string, that causes my index finger to lift from the A string.

I'll try harder to try softer wink.gif

Cheers



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jstcrsn
post Jul 17 2019, 01:31 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Jul 17 2019, 11:29 AM) *
Not sure if this will be of any help, but for me, it's all about control and not strength. Your hand is absolutely strong enough to hold a barre chord. The trick is distributing that strength and pressure evenly. Especially between your thumb, the first finger and across the top of your hand. If you feel too much pressure in any of these 3 areas, back it off a bit.

Another thing I do that helps me change chords smoothly is that I always visualize one step ahead. And I mean I really visualize the next move as in I see my hand on the fretboard making that next chord.

I know you did not want the word practice but..it is not so much practice but rather training your hand to go to untrained position . Ken has trained his hands to do what he sees in his mind ,and as much as training his fingers is that he is training his mind, and this is what practice is doing . Every teacher at this site has been where you are , those that can play have chosen not to give up .
Hang in there , the reward will be worth it. You are improving
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Phil66
post Jul 17 2019, 06:05 PM
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QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Jul 17 2019, 12:31 PM) *
I know you did not want the word practice but..it is not so much practice but rather training your hand to go to untrained position . Ken has trained his hands to do what he sees in his mind ,and as much as training his fingers is that he is training his mind, and this is what practice is doing . Every teacher at this site has been where you are , those that can play have chosen not to give up .
Hang in there , the reward will be worth it. You are improving


Thanks buddy, just keep plugging away is the answer then I guess.

Cheers cool.gif


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Mertay
post Jul 17 2019, 07:07 PM
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I very slightly angle my index finger (barring finger) counter-clockwise.

The bending parts of the finger has a little gap, so if a string falls right under there it will buzz unless you press very hard. But the sides of the bending part of the finger has no gaps so I take advantage.

Its a very slight twist, but you can also get this twist by moving the headstock of the guitar further away from you while the body sits on the same place if you feel stress on your left wrist while trying..


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Phil66
post Jul 17 2019, 08:59 PM
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Thanks Mertay,

I've watched both of the videos below but it's a lot more difficult to apply to chords, for me anyway. Because the shape is tricky to hold, the whole hand itself becomes rigid and set into the chord shape. In order for all notes to ring out, particularly on the index finger, I tend to have to push my whole hand harder because it's hard to isolate different strings underneath the index finger, even if I twist it.

I know it's just a case of more hours on the neck though, I just tend to give in too easily after half an hour and forearm ache with no noticeable improvement.

Thanks folks.

Soft touch video 1.
https://youtu.be/ixcfVBdsV9I


Soft touch video 2.
https://youtu.be/wsEHi1wykkc


Further to the post above:

UPDATE:

I CAN do it. I've just sat here for a while fretting the dominant 7 chords at the 5th fret, root on 6th string and root on 5th. I sat with the tuner on and the notes weren't sharp. I must have fretted 50 chords and plucked each string individually. It's just a matter of less aggression; attention to detail and focus. Now I have to work on keeping it that way when playing. I think 20 minutes each night should help. Aaaaaaargh even more to squeeze into my 60-90 minutes. I'm already trying to fit two hours into one and a quarter hours laugh.gif

By the way, I can't recommend the Boss TU-3 tuner enough. Great for practise, the bypass output allows the tuner to work and the sound to go through to your speakers, great way to check on your bending pitch etc, just be sure not to rely on it, just use it to check when you think you have it right wink.gif

This post has been edited by Phil66: Jul 17 2019, 09:02 PM


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Caelumamittendum
post Jul 17 2019, 09:36 PM
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Isn't that exactly the video I posted? tongue.gif


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Phil66
post Jul 17 2019, 09:55 PM
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Sorry Ben,

I saw your post while I was at work but didn't get chance to watch the video. By the time I got home it had slipped my mind and Gab had posted it in my mentoring thread.

Thanks though buddy, I appreciate you helping wub.gif

Cheers


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 18 2019, 03:54 AM
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Being able to control hand pressure on big chords is a tricky thing. I always start with the Bar finger and find the right angle of the hand and then find what is the least amount of pressure I can use without issues. Then add one finger at a time. having low action and using light gauge strings certain helps in this kind of thing. Then again, I find those two factors tend to help in just about everything that has to do with guitar smile.gif

Todd
QUOTE (Phil66 @ Jul 17 2019, 03:59 PM) *
Thanks Mertay,

I've watched both of the videos below but it's a lot more difficult to apply to chords, for me anyway. Because the shape is tricky to hold, the whole hand itself becomes rigid and set into the chord shape. In order for all notes to ring out, particularly on the index finger, I tend to have to push my whole hand harder because it's hard to isolate different strings underneath the index finger, even if I twist it.

I know it's just a case of more hours on the neck though, I just tend to give in too easily after half an hour and forearm ache with no noticeable improvement.

Thanks folks.

Soft touch video 1.
https://youtu.be/ixcfVBdsV9I


Soft touch video 2.
https://youtu.be/wsEHi1wykkc


Further to the post above:

UPDATE:

I CAN do it. I've just sat here for a while fretting the dominant 7 chords at the 5th fret, root on 6th string and root on 5th. I sat with the tuner on and the notes weren't sharp. I must have fretted 50 chords and plucked each string individually. It's just a matter of less aggression; attention to detail and focus. Now I have to work on keeping it that way when playing. I think 20 minutes each night should help. Aaaaaaargh even more to squeeze into my 60-90 minutes. I'm already trying to fit two hours into one and a quarter hours laugh.gif

By the way, I can't recommend the Boss TU-3 tuner enough. Great for practise, the bypass output allows the tuner to work and the sound to go through to your speakers, great way to check on your bending pitch etc, just be sure not to rely on it, just use it to check when you think you have it right wink.gif
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Phil66
post Jul 18 2019, 07:31 AM
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Thanks folks,

I think people may have missed this, I posted it as a separate post but it put it below the videos in my last post for some reason.

UPDATE:

I CAN do it. I've just sat here for a while fretting the dominant 7 chords at the 5th fret, root on 6th string and root on 5th. I sat with the tuner on and the notes weren't sharp. I must have fretted 50 chords and plucked each string individually. It's just a matter of less aggression; attention to detail and focus. Now I have to work on keeping it that way when playing. I think 20 minutes each night should help. Aaaaaaargh even more to squeeze into my 60-90 minutes. I'm already trying to fit two hours into one and a quarter hours laugh.gif

By the way, I can't recommend the Boss TU-3 tuner enough. Great for practise, the bypass output allows the tuner to work and the sound to go through to your speakers, great way to check on your bending pitch etc, just be sure not to rely on it, just use it to check when you think you have it right wink.gif

This post has been edited by Phil66: Jul 18 2019, 10:38 AM


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klasaine
post Jul 18 2019, 09:25 AM
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Something I noticed watching my own videos is that many times you can can see me forming the chords in the air while I'm shifting.
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Phil66
post Jul 18 2019, 10:37 AM
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Yeah i was taught many years ago before a twenty year noodling gap, "never walk the chord, always land on it".

Did you see my update above buddy?

Cheers for your input Ken smile.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 19 2019, 02:36 AM
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Sticking the landing is key smile.gif Pick two very different chords at differnt frets and try to move back and forth while not losing time/synch/fret etc. That's a drill I used to do all the time when I first realized that power chords were not the only chords.
QUOTE (Phil66 @ Jul 18 2019, 05:37 AM) *
Yeah i was taught many years ago before a twenty year noodling gap, "never walk the chord, always land on it".

Did you see my update above buddy?

Cheers for your input Ken smile.gif
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