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Neck Relief Drop Tuning Question
Phil66
Jul 6 2020, 12:31 PM
Learning Apprentice Player
Posts: 7.549
Joined: 5-July 14
From: The Black Country, England
It appears to work like that if you watch that video but that block that the springs are attached to is a solid block attached to the rest of the assembly above it, the trem can only pivot up and down, it can't rotate even in the slightest in the same direction as, say, the control knobs. this is why I don't get it.

I hope you can see where I'm coming from. I can't understand why loosening one spring on a solid block that is anchored to moving in one plane, can alter tension on one side.

I'm trying to think of an analogy better than this one but here goes. Attach a spring to one corner of a seesaw and attach that to the ground. No matter where you put that spring, ie, left, right or centre, the force required to push the other end down will be the same at any point on the edge. Attach three springs of different tension, the required force at the other end will be the total of the three springs wherever you push it.

I need a scientist laugh.gif



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jul 5 2020, 10:36 PM) *
I always thought it had more of a regional effect. E.G. Loosen the first spring and the first few strings are effected and so on.

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This post has been edited by Phil66: Jul 6 2020, 12:57 PM


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Todd Simpson
Jul 7 2020, 02:11 AM
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Well, imagine the seesaw is wide. It's got 3 spring holding it but the springs are angled in. As opposed to another see saw that has five springs which are just straight. The one with three springs has a more focused reglonal impact based on tension as there are only three springs to balance all the weight. THe seesaw with five spring has less result when you loosen one spring as the other four take up the slack.

In general if you tighten all the springs once you get your saddles where you want them you can find the sweet spot to get the trem to "float". Make sure the strings are well, really well, stretched first of course smile.gif

Todd



QUOTE (Phil66 @ Jul 6 2020, 07:31 AM) *
It appears to work like that if you watch that video but that block that the springs are attached to is a solid block attached to the rest of the assembly above it, the trem can only pivot up and down, it can't rotate even in the slightest in the same direction as, say, the control knobs. this is why I don't get it.

I hope you can see where I'm coming from. I can't understand why loosening one spring on a solid block that is anchored to moving in one plane, can alter tension on one side.

I'm trying to think of an analogy better than this one but here goes. Attach a spring to one corner of a seesaw and attach that to the ground. No matter where you put that spring, ie, left, right or centre, the force required to push the other end down will be the same at any point on the edge. Attach three springs of different tension, the required force at the other end will be the total of the three springs wherever you push it.

I need a scientist laugh.gif

You are at GuitarMasterClass.net


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Phil66
Jul 7 2020, 07:55 AM
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Posts: 7.549
Joined: 5-July 14
From: The Black Country, England
I see what you're trying to say, but regardless of where the springs are on the one side, angled or not, the force required at the other side will be equal across all areas, the saddles are effectively sitting on top of the seesaw. Obviously my engineering brain is missing something fundamental here laugh.gif

Each saddle is independent of the others but is fix to the assembly. I'll speak to my luthier, when I get chance, he has an engineering background. Sometimes things are counterintuitive. I need to let this go, I'm losing sleep over it laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif

I think my main point of misunderstanding is that I can't see how you can adjust the relative tension between the strings. Lets say, if, an I know it probably isn't but if string 4 has double the tension of string 1, if you increase the pull on the trem block to lift it up (floating) there will be more tension across all string the the relative tension will be the same, ie, 4 will still be twice as much as 1 (if it was in the first place but you know what I mean).

Maybe strings don't alter tension equally with increased load and there is a sweet spot that gives you the same result as that video whether you have the claw angled or not. That's what I'm starting to think now.

Cheers

Phil

QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jul 7 2020, 02:11 AM) *
Well, imagine the seesaw is wide. It's got 3 spring holding it but the springs are angled in. As opposed to another see saw that has five springs which are just straight. The one with three springs has a more focused reglonal impact based on tension as there are only three springs to balance all the weight. THe seesaw with five spring has less result when you loosen one spring as the other four take up the slack.
Todd

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This post has been edited by Phil66: Jul 7 2020, 09:51 AM


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