> How To Improvise Forever?, Got this question today
Kristofer Dahl
post Jun 10 2019, 02:13 PM
Post #1


GMC Founder & Rocker
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 16.190
Joined: 15-August 05
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Member No.: 2



How do you improvise forever and avoid repeating yourself? Tough question! Here is my attempt to answer it:




Do you struggle with improvising? Why / why not? Do you have tips?


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
 
Start new topic
Replies
klasaine
post Jun 11 2019, 01:50 AM
Post #2


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.436
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



Xlnt advice from Kris.
"If you wanna make new stuff up, you gotta practice makin' stuff up".

Probably stemming from my inherent laziness, every new lick I learn or make up - I try to find at least 3 or 4 chords that it'll work over. A simple example is that most any A minor (minor penta) type line will usually work well over C major and E minor chords and also probably D minor and F major chords. Sometimes the lick just needs a one note adjustment.
I noticed early on that the best "improvisers" recycled a lot of their licks and lines within their solos but masked or tweaked them in ways that didn't make it so obvious ... until you really started paying attention. This is the stuff that gives players their sound and style.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jun 11 2019, 01:52 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Kristofer Dahl
post Jun 11 2019, 12:45 PM
Post #3


GMC Founder & Rocker
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 16.190
Joined: 15-August 05
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Member No.: 2



QUOTE (klasaine @ Jun 11 2019, 02:50 AM) *
Probably stemming from my inherent laziness, every new lick I learn or make up - I try to find at least 3 or 4 chords that it'll work over. A simple example is that most any A minor (minor penta) type line will usually work well over C major and E minor chords and also probably D minor and F major chords. Sometimes the lick just needs a one note adjustment.
I noticed early on that the best "improvisers" recycled a lot of their licks and lines within their solos but masked or tweaked them in ways that didn't make it so obvious ... until you really started paying attention. This is the stuff that gives players their sound and style.


This is def a solid way of looking at it. But for me this method was never inspiring when I tried it. Many years later I feel like it somewhat overcomplicates things - unless you are really fast at visualising theory.

I realised that if you are playing an Am lick over an Am chord, and the next chord is D minor - then chances are if you change the last note to anything it will sound like you adapted the lick. And if you are unlucky, just keep playing one more note and that one should be ok.

The explanation is that most of the times in pop/rock the chords belong to the same key - so the underlying harmony is typically 3 notes out of 7 possible. So if there is a chord change you will probably be ok - or you might need to move up and down one step in the scale.

What I am describing is not something to try on your first gig - but for practicing I think this can be a very smooth way of looking at things - without needing to understand lots of theory. I also think looking at it this way will give you free ear training.

QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Jun 11 2019, 04:12 AM) *
That's also my favorite part, followed by this one:


"Here is a question for you... How do you keep improvising forever and never run out of ideas?... mmm I don't know" laugh.gif


Anything else wouldn't have been honest 😅


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Jun 11 2019, 03:10 PM
Post #4


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.436
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ Jun 11 2019, 04:45 AM) *
This is def a solid way of looking at it. But for me this method was never inspiring when I tried it. Many years later I feel like it somewhat overcomplicates things - unless you are really fast at visualising theory.


I noticed it (same lick fits over several different chords and keys) long before I knew anything about theory.
Think about it, the guitar is pretty visual - an Am looks a lot like a C.


This post has been edited by klasaine: Jun 11 2019, 03:37 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Posts in this topic
- Kristofer Dahl   How To Improvise Forever?   Jun 10 2019, 02:13 PM
- - Gabriel Leopardi   Excellent video Kris! As always very inspirin...   Jun 10 2019, 04:11 PM
- - Phil66   That's a great video Kris, It's one of th...   Jun 10 2019, 08:56 PM
|- - Kristofer Dahl   QUOTE (klasaine @ Jun 11 2019, 04:10 PM) ...   Jun 12 2019, 07:48 AM
|- - Rids   Another winner video. Thanks Kris!   Jun 12 2019, 10:38 PM
|- - Kristofer Dahl   QUOTE (Rids @ Jun 12 2019, 11:38 PM) Anot...   Jun 13 2019, 06:35 AM
- - Todd Simpson   As ken already noted, great adice. "If you wa...   Jun 11 2019, 02:43 AM
|- - Gabriel Leopardi   QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jun 10 2019, 10:43 ...   Jun 11 2019, 03:12 AM
|- - Todd Simpson   Hah!! Loved that too Hehehehe. QUOTE (...   Jun 11 2019, 03:31 AM
- - Monica Gheorghevici   Awesome video Kris!!! I want to ad...   Jun 11 2019, 09:08 AM
- - Adam   Great video, very nice to watch! It's ma...   Jun 13 2019, 11:44 PM
- - Todd Simpson   Many players, not just blues, often make "Gui...   Jun 14 2019, 02:33 AM
- - Kristofer Dahl   QUOTE (Adam @ Jun 14 2019, 12:44 AM) Grea...   Jun 14 2019, 09:18 AM
- - Adam   QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ Jun 14 2019, 09:1...   Jun 15 2019, 05:24 PM
- - Todd Simpson   You wont' get any better at it unless you prac...   Jun 18 2019, 03:48 AM
- - Kristofer Dahl   QUOTE (Adam @ Jun 15 2019, 06:24 PM) I us...   Jun 18 2019, 08:30 AM


Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 20th July 2019 - 10:27 AM