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Stevie-Ray-Vaugh...
post Jan 27 2008, 09:52 PM
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If I wanted to record drums, (no need to be professional level) what mic(s) would I go about using? (perferabley >$200)
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Hisham Al-Sanea
post Jan 27 2008, 10:00 PM
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some from AKG model


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 28 2008, 01:47 AM
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For less than 200$? Well, I don't know the prices there man, but you will be needing a set of mics and a mixer in order to record drums. Almost any mic can be used to record drums, but you can try some cheap specialized kits. If you can't find anything for that price, try to rent some good kit, or buy a set of ordinary mics, like some cheap shures and one bass mic and play with those. For less than 200$ there aren't many options my friend sad.gif


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Stevie-Ray-Vaugh...
post Jan 28 2008, 02:14 AM
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QUOTE (Milenkovic Ivan @ Jan 28 2008, 12:47 AM) *
For less than 200$? Well, I don't know the prices there man, but you will be needing a set of mics and a mixer in order to record drums. Almost any mic can be used to record drums, but you can try some cheap specialized kits. If you can't find anything for that price, try to rent some good kit, or buy a set of ordinary mics, like some cheap shures and one bass mic and play with those. For less than 200$ there aren't many options my friend sad.gif


I think you have me wrong. I have the drumset, and I'm buying a mixer. I meant what mics <200 EACH. Any suggestions now?


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 28 2008, 02:57 AM
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Sorry for misunderstanding man.

Try out some Shure kits. They sell three SM57's, and one Beta52 "egg" along with mounts. I think you get a case with those too. These are really a standard, and going around 350$ for all 4 of them. You just need to get two overheads and that it for starters.


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JVM
post Jan 28 2008, 03:01 AM
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QUOTE (Milenkovic Ivan @ Jan 27 2008, 08:57 PM) *
Sorry for misunderstanding man.

Try out some Shure kits. They sell three SM57's, and one Beta52 "egg" along with mounts. I think you get a case with those too. These are really a standard, and going around 350$ for all 4 of them. You just need to get two overheads and that it for starters.


I think this is a good way to go. When I'm jamming with my drummer and we decide to record something he uses one for the snare, one on the bass, and one for the cymbals, and it sounds fine. Two of them are sm57s (snare and cymbals) and I don't know what the other is because its kind of a no name mic, but it sounds okay. Overall the drums sound pretty good.


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Stevie-Ray-Vaugh...
post Jan 28 2008, 03:05 AM
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Yeah, I think we're going to go with 2 SM57's, and a Beta52. Thanks guys! smile.gif


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JVM
post Jan 28 2008, 05:07 AM
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I forgot to add, yeah he has toms too and thats covered in the cymbal mic I think, kind of a general purpose overhead thing. Really you could record with just two mics but three or four will guarantee a good sound.


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Andrew Cockburn
post Jan 28 2008, 02:02 PM
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In mixing terms, you generally get most oif the sound from the overheads if you have them - they should givce you an overall balanced stereo mix, along with some room ambience. Then you add mics for individual hits so you can process them separately and add more focus. I would suggest, if your budget runs to it:

1. Something like the Sure Kit - use the SM57s on the snare and one for each of the toms, or you can douhble up on the toms. Obvously use the pod for the bass. If you want to go to town, you can mic the top and bottom of the snare (remember to swap the phase of one of them when you mix to avoid cancellations). Maybe one for your hihat.

2. For the overhead a pair of good quality condenser mics. In that price range I like Rode NT1As - also AKG C1000 is a good mic.

That kind of combination is approaching how the professional studios do it - a usual drum-micing setup would have 9 -11 mics. Of course, you can get good results with less mics as JVM says, but I would pay some attention to the overheads.


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Dejan Farkas
post Jan 28 2008, 02:21 PM
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My recommendation for overhead condernser mics is SHURE PG81, I bought two on eBay for total of $165. It is an instrument condenser mic, I bought two of them to record my acoustic guitar in stereo, but they can be used as overheads as well smile.gif


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