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> Which Scales?, lost
bliopster
post Feb 1 2008, 06:39 AM
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ive been playing guitar on and off for a few years starting to pick it up heavily now but i never took any time to learn scales or any notes until i sign up for gmc = ] how do you know which scales to use when soloing? i make up decent solos by trial and error but i found a site with all the scales there are so many! i know i must be using them but i have no idea how to single out the ones i need for certain sounds any advice greatly appreciated ^^;!
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Muris Varajic
post Feb 1 2008, 07:41 AM
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First choice would be Major,Minor,Major Pentatonic and Minor Pentatonic.
Check out some video lessons,there are scales diagrams bellow written text
AND check out Andrew's theory lesson.

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mattacuk
post Feb 1 2008, 09:33 AM
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Remember that you kill two birds with one stone - GMC Lessons provide accompanying scale charts along with lessons. You can learn technique and licks as well as scales at any one time... wink.gif


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Feb 1 2008, 12:17 PM
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Welcome to GMC.

I suggest you take a look at Andrew's Theory board FIRST. Scales are very very good explained and it can give you some insights and ideas what to practice.
Off course if you haven't practiced scales before, i suggest the usual - A minor pentatonic in all positions for starters. Keep us updated of your learning experience, so we can help you even further. Thanks! smile.gif


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jacmoe
post Feb 1 2008, 08:41 PM
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QUOTE (bliopster @ Feb 1 2008, 06:39 AM) *
i found a site with all the scales there are so many! i know i must be using them but i have no idea how to single out the ones i need for certain sounds any advice greatly appreciated ^^;!

There really aren't that many:
If you learn the minor pentatonic scale and the major scale, you're almost there.
Change a note in each pattern and you've got harmonic minor, change two and get melodic minor.

If you learn the minor pentatonic, major pentatonic is learnt as well (just shift the positions).

Learn the major scale in the five CAGED positions (and you will notice that the pentatonic scale fits right into that) - and play them all the time.

When you know it by heart, and played the modes (dorian, phrygian, lydian, ...), learn the harmonic minor scale. Almost identical to the major scale boxes.
And the fun begins. laugh.gif


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