2 Pages V  < 1 2  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Fret Light Guitars....
Darfuria
post Nov 26 2008, 07:55 PM
Post #21


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 322
Joined: 11-April 08
From: United Kingdom
Member No.: 4.867



Well I'll buy one and let you know wink.gif


--------------------
Want a website for you or your band? http://www.websiteformyband.com
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Trond Vold
post Nov 26 2008, 08:01 PM
Post #22


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 3.497
Joined: 16-February 08
From: Norge!
Member No.: 4.261



QUOTE (jdriver @ Nov 26 2008, 07:40 PM) *
I'll be the one to poop in the punchbowl. I think it's an interesting idea, but ultimately I think it will slow you down. Looking for the lights adds another layer of computation in your brain which I don't think will help to cement the underlying musical learning. You need to learn the intervals with your hands and your head, and I think the visual process of the lights will ultimately hurt more than help. Playing "live," it would certainly be useless. You couldn't follow the lights fast enough to do any good, unless it is dead slow practice.

Cynic's response: Someone had an idea, and they want to sell it to you. The money could be better spent on a fine guitar and a copy of Fretboard Logic, and you can learn chords from a small pocket size booklet.

Just my opinion. Feel free to shoot me down.


I agree to the fullest! I can see how it could be useful early on in the initial learning process, but once you get better, following lights will slow you down. Notes should be memorized and stored in the fast-memory.. or the brain-cache.. as early as possible.

This post has been edited by Trond Vold: Nov 26 2008, 08:04 PM


--------------------
Guitars: Schecter Stiletto Classic, Jackson SLSMG, Ibanez RG-380 Japan, Gibson Les Paul Studio

Amp: Marshall JMP-1 -> Rocktron Velocity 100 -> Marshall JCM-900 Lead 4x12

FX and stomps: T.C Electronics G-Sharp, Korg SDD-1200, Emma Transmorgrifier, BYOC Tribooster, GGG Green Ringer, Dinosaur Overdrive, Voodoo Lab SuperFuzz, Sovtek Bassballs, Line6 Tap Tremolo, EHX Screaming Bird.


___________________________________________________
My Lessons!

My Instructor Board!

My Myspace!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Praetorian
post Nov 26 2008, 08:17 PM
Post #23


Learning Apprentice Player & Challenge Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.994
Joined: 10-March 08
From: Albany NY USA
Member No.: 4.521



I think it is to be used more as a learning reference guide. When I used it in the store, it would turn the lights on and off...just to check if I was in the correct scale, then turn it off again. I don't think you are supposed to use it to show you every note you are supposed to play. I agree, that use of the guitar would be improper for learning!


--------------------
Ben
___________________________________________
"PLAY YOUR DAMN GUITAR!!"
- Kirk Hammett

Fender American Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG4EXQM1
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
FrankW
post Nov 27 2008, 06:06 AM
Post #24


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 622
Joined: 29-April 08
From: Fort Mill, SC, USA, Pangea, Earth
Member No.: 5.004



I think Fretlights could be useful for those just starting out, and/or as a reference tool, except chord and scale books are cheaper...pretty cool concept though. But, I'm hiding my punchbowl! laugh.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jdriver
post Nov 27 2008, 06:22 AM
Post #25


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 484
Joined: 25-May 08
From: Southwest USA
Member No.: 5.174



I can see how it could be extremely helpful in a teaching situation, where the teacher shows the student what he's doing with the lights. I know in my own case, I find it very hard to watch someone play and understand where their fingers are.

It really does come down to that if it helps you, then it is worthwhile. What I wrote was really just speculation on how the brain processes information. I'm thinking that it's like if if you had a baseball bat that sensed the approaching pitch and beeped when you were supposed to swing. Would you learn to watch the ball, or listen for the beep? I think we all know you watch the ball and "the Force" will tell you when to swing. biggrin.gif


--------------------
"I dreamed a lot when I was younger..
I'm older now but still I hunger
For some understanding.
There's no understanding, now.
Was there ever?

...Joe Puerta (Ambrosia)...


Finally got a YouTube page going.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Noangels
post Nov 27 2008, 09:17 AM
Post #26


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 316
Joined: 4-August 08
From: blighty
Member No.: 5.628



It must be a pretty handy tool for visualizing scales over the board,I think most people who would buy it would only use it for that reason alone rather than playing it onstage.Could also be usefull for teachers as students could pick up the shapes easier when they can see them

I had the idea of this type of guitar a L O N G time ago after seeing cheap keyboards doing the same thing with the keys lighting up the scales,being a guitarist as well I could see that working on that instrument very well.

Its a great tool,I havnt got one and to be honest wont get one but If I was teaching full time it might make a usefull investment to help the students see these scales all over the neck rather than the individual boxes in all positions:)


--------------------
Ibanez geo and a line 6 spider
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
fretman59
post Nov 27 2008, 09:44 PM
Post #27


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 7
Joined: 21-November 08
From: Chessington, Surrey, England
Member No.: 6.277



QUOTE (jdriver @ Nov 27 2008, 07:22 AM) *
I can see how it could be extremely helpful in a teaching situation, where the teacher shows the student what he's doing with the lights. I know in my own case, I find it very hard to watch someone play and understand where their fingers are.

It really does come down to that if it helps you, then it is worthwhile. What I wrote was really just speculation on how the brain processes information. I'm thinking that it's like if if you had a baseball bat that sensed the approaching pitch and beeped when you were supposed to swing. Would you learn to watch the ball, or listen for the beep? I think we all know you watch the ball and "the Force" will tell you when to swing. biggrin.gif


Hi
In a way I agree with you. We all like different guitars, strings amps etc. An individual choice. When I bought the fretlight I had not played for a few years and for me to see the lights under my fingers showing me scales and chords was a quick way to learn as I learn quicker by watching. But just having the knowledge does not make a good guitarist, which is why I joined this web site, so that I could watch, hear and eventually feel what others did with their knowledge.
I think of it as the second part of my learning process.

Cheers
Fretman59
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jdriver
post Nov 28 2008, 01:38 AM
Post #28


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 484
Joined: 25-May 08
From: Southwest USA
Member No.: 5.174



I'd be interested to hear how you like the guitar itself, besides the lights. Does it have pickups you like and tone you like, and play well? If so, you got a nice guitar, with an extra cool feature to it.


--------------------
"I dreamed a lot when I was younger..
I'm older now but still I hunger
For some understanding.
There's no understanding, now.
Was there ever?

...Joe Puerta (Ambrosia)...


Finally got a YouTube page going.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Darfuria
post Nov 28 2008, 01:29 PM
Post #29


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 322
Joined: 11-April 08
From: United Kingdom
Member No.: 4.867



I have a great memory - so I'd see the various scales and chord shapes displayed on the neck so that I know where my fingers are supposed to go, and then I'd play them without guidance. I'd learn very well that way.


--------------------
Want a website for you or your band? http://www.websiteformyband.com
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
fretman59
post Nov 29 2008, 05:24 PM
Post #30


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 7
Joined: 21-November 08
From: Chessington, Surrey, England
Member No.: 6.277



QUOTE (jdriver @ Nov 28 2008, 02:38 AM) *
I'd be interested to hear how you like the guitar itself, besides the lights. Does it have pickups you like and tone you like, and play well? If so, you got a nice guitar, with an extra cool feature to it.


Hi jdriver
The fretlight is an average low cost guitar. A starter guitar really, very nice feeling fretboard that gives a mellow sound, but I would put the hardware in the lower cost squire range. A good learning tool at home, but not a gigging guitar.
Cheers
Fretman59
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tommyboy
post Nov 29 2008, 06:20 PM
Post #31


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 257
Joined: 2-November 08
From: North Dakota, USA
Member No.: 6.175



QUOTE (fatb0t @ Mar 8 2008, 03:15 PM) *
http://www.fretlight.com/index.html

Check that link out guys....

I saw an ad for these in Guitar Player - they look really bad ass, apparently you can load scales on the computer and they show up via LED on the fret board.

Seems like an AWESOME tool to have, really make memorization easy...

Anyone ever tried one out?


OMG! what a great idea. Just wish I would have thought of it first!

What a great learning tool this would be. Can you imagine doing a Muris shred lesson on one of these.
1970's disco lights baby!! laugh.gif

My first reaction was another learning gimick. But after watching a few of the videos and seeing some of the potential I'm seriously thinking of getting one of these.

Thanks for the link, I'm sure my wife won't be very happy with you though. wink.gif

tommyboy


--------------------
Rock Hard or Not at ALL!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

2 Pages V  < 1 2
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 23rd March 2017 - 11:21 PM