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> Music Theory.., necesary or not?
Nemanja Filipovi...
post Mar 13 2008, 12:24 AM
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Reading the post of JVM in theard "wrighting music" massterclassguitar forum....
made me wonder...
is it necesary to knowe theory to play(operantly not)....but does it help...
what do you think?smile.gif


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Mar 13 2008, 12:35 AM
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We had this several topics regarding this and again my answer is - yes, theory is very useful, it is the "language of the musicians" and musicians can comunicate better when knowing theory, whetter they write it on paper, or just use theory terms to describe what they do and play.


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Hisham Al-Sanea
post Mar 13 2008, 12:38 AM
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its very important


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Nemanja Filipovi...
post Mar 13 2008, 12:39 AM
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QUOTE (Milenkovic Ivan @ Mar 13 2008, 12:35 AM) *
We had this several topics regarding this and again my answer is - yes, theory is very useful, it is the "language of the musicians" and musicians can comunicate better when knowing theory, whetter they write it on paper, or just use theory terms to describe what they do and play.

I agree...for example if you play and in range of one scale..yuo shoud knowe all the chords in range of that scale befor you modulate....for me it is easyer that way.....

p.s....did not knowe ther was topics on this subject...sory unsure.gif


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Mar 13 2008, 01:19 AM
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Off course, knowing all the scales and harmony is a must, also knowing other stuff and communicating with others like "play staccato, or alternate here, and economy there" or play "forte" this part... - means something precise and mesaure-able so people can understand each other better. THat's my point of view.


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JVM
post Mar 13 2008, 01:30 AM
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QUOTE (Milenkovic Ivan @ Mar 12 2008, 08:19 PM) *
Off course, knowing all the scales and harmony is a must, also knowing other stuff and communicating with others like "play staccato, or alternate here, and economy there" or play "forte" this part... - means something precise and mesaure-able so people can understand each other better. THat's my point of view.


I think that most serious guitar players will pick up terms like stacatto and different types of picking (which is more a technique than theory isn't it?). At the same time I think the most important aspect of theory is learning intervals and ear training.

I just think there is an over emphasis on learning scales. Scales are nice, scales are good, but learning to hear what is going on is often overlooked for new players. That is the technique that makes Marty and Jimi for example so good. This should be combined with a knowledge of scales. You should be able to pick out and know the key you are in at all times for example.

I'm not saying theory is totally garbage though wink.gif


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Guitarman700
post Mar 13 2008, 02:37 AM
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i would say, yes, very important. every time i learn something new in theory, my playing improves noticeably. ive started studying theory more than ever lately, as im not happy with my current level of knowledge.


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RIP Dime
post Mar 13 2008, 03:21 AM
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Theory can be a great asset, guitarists who don't take advantage of it may take much longer to improve in all areas of playing.

The main goal for me as a guitar player is to make good music, if I didn't have the knowledge of theory I do now it would be harder for me to make good music. When I make songs I don't really pay attention to the theory side of playing, I just play what sounds cool to me, but my knowledge of theory helps me find out what's going on, and why it sounds cool, and that helps me build on top of ideas and come up with things that sound better and are more interesting. I also wouldn't be very good at translating ideas in my head into music if I didn't know theory. That's why i think theory is good to know.


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Trond Vold
post Mar 13 2008, 03:53 AM
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I would say that you can become a relatively good guitarist/musician with little to no theory knowledge, and in some cases.. freakishly good, like in Marty Friedmans case.
But i think at "relatively good" is where it will stop for most of us if we dont know much theory.

Becoming familiar with the scales will push you alot further.


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Juan M. Valero
post Mar 13 2008, 07:48 AM
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it's important for playing but it's more important for writing music wink.gif


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demonmyst
post Mar 13 2008, 08:08 AM
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I wish I forced myself to learn theory. I learned some just by playing, but I'm clueless as to what scales I know, some of my techniques and stuff.

I'm trying to figure out more things, but lazyness rules over me. Which is the reason why I have such a low post count and only spent a few hours on here out of 2 months or maybe a bit more! :[


Edit- Actually thinking that over....I know most of my technique names, I know most of the minor scale and major scale shapes I can improvise on them, and a few other scales, but I never know what key I'm in for the life of me! Probably one of the popular ones like E I assume.

I have Guitar Grimoire scales and modes, I should probably make use of it. There's also all the shapes I need to know, ah! Theory is soooooo gigantic! Then after shapes it's what comes OUT of the box. Psch....silly musical theory.

On my piece, knowing the names of things helps you sound like you know your instrument :]

This post has been edited by demonmyst: Mar 13 2008, 03:07 PM
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demonmyst
post Mar 13 2008, 08:10 AM
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Accident double post...

This post has been edited by demonmyst: Mar 13 2008, 08:11 AM
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Marcus Lavendell
post Mar 13 2008, 09:07 AM
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Yes. Theory is important, because it's a part of music... but it's only a part, and you can do well if you just know the very basic stuff, as already mentioned.

But don't get me wrong, of course it's better to know the theory than not knowing it smile.gif


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Andrew Cockburn
post Mar 13 2008, 12:55 PM
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You can use theory in a couple of different ways ...

Firstly, if you are an experienced player but know no theory, once you start to learn it it can explain things you have been doing all along - for instance, a lot of us will instinctively use modes such as Dorian and Mixolydian without knowing it. Whilst its nice to understand that you are doing things, it is still after the fact.

But once you learn some theory, you can start to put it in front of the process and do these things deliberately from the standpoint of knowledge, then the benefit becomes that you can take your playing to new places through deliberate application of theory techniques, at which point you start to get some value out of it.

If you limit yourself to the first scenario, it comes down to how good you are at fumbling through the dark - some are very good, others are hopeless. Learning theory puts a light on, and you don't need to fumble anymore!


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mattacuk
post Mar 13 2008, 04:01 PM
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Fantastic topic smile.gif

And my answer is .... yes it is important to know you theory smile.gif I just dont belive in over complicating things with it.

We get alot of new guitarist who stress themselves out with trying to learn complex theory too fast!! I belive that practice should come first, and theory a littler later - when you are ready to take it in.

For me time/rythm is the best place to start of with. This is because undestanding rythm enables a new player to use his/her metronome effectivly, thus practicing efficently right from the start!!

Once he or she has been practicing exercises and peices of music correctly for a while, then he/she will be in a good positiong to understand theory basics more redaly. Intervals are a great place to start because you learn to build chord progressions and start being Creative. smile.gif

In short, I belive you should make theory work for YOU, and not you working for it wink.gif


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post Mar 13 2008, 04:05 PM
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You don't need to know any theory whatsoever to write music. I know no music theory. Well I know a little more than I did when I wrote our EP. It's all about being able to hear the music and tab out what you hear. Having a good set of ears is much better than knowing theory. Knowing theory can make you choose the obvious choice for a note whereas not knowing theory maybe you'll pick a strange note that works really well in context of the song you are doing. Music Theory lets you write songs quicker but they aren't necessarily going to be better. I'm a firm believer in trusting your ears and the music you hear.


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Robin
post Mar 13 2008, 04:26 PM
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Theory is not "very important" at all IMO. But i suppose its still pretty good to know.


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Chris Evans
post Mar 13 2008, 04:43 PM
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I dont put a huge emphasis on theory either although I do have some ground knowledge, I think Andrews answer here is spot on for me, I`ve fumbled around for a long time, but now applying some theory "before" the event gives some extra options that may have been overlooked before or at least not found as quickly, I mix the two really, ears and theory.


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Guitarman700
post Mar 13 2008, 06:15 PM
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this is becoming an interesting discussion. perhaps it should be stickied. perhaps with a short bullet point summary of the pros and cons of theory.

This post has been edited by Guitarman700: Mar 13 2008, 06:15 PM


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SLASH91
post Mar 13 2008, 06:26 PM
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I don't even know any scales, I just havn't made myself sit down and learn them. It's so boring imo. I never wan't to learn how to construct chords or anything like that, but I really do need to learn some scales and memorize the fretboard.


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