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> How Much Do You Practice Before Recording?
steve25
post Mar 25 2008, 03:30 PM
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I was just wondering for those who have done recordings before for a band or whatever how much do you have to practice your own material before you can record it? I mean i'm guessing it's easier to practice your own stuff then learning someone elses. So how much do you have to practice before you can go and record the whole song this includes both rhythm and lead stuff as most of the time you have to record it more than once so you have to get it perfectly right
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Nemanja Filipovi...
post Mar 25 2008, 03:35 PM
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a lot...before me and my band went in to studio...for a bout a month we practise all moust every day...couse time is monny in studio,and every note has to be practiced...


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MickeM
post Mar 25 2008, 03:57 PM
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For the home recording, just until it's tight.

With the band we record every session to use mp3's as study material before the next session.

Practicing a completely song could take hours of repeating parts until it's tight and correct.
This part concists of repeating the intro. Repeating the verse, repeating the corus, solo, ending, until everything sits tight.
Then we assemble all pieces into a song.
The first rehearsal we usualy record the bits and pieces + the entire song. The following times the song only.
We develop the song the coming rehearsals until we're satisfied and move on to the next.

First rehearsal a new song could take up the entire 3-4 hours. Tidious for sure but when it starts to get tight there's no use to move on to the next song but keep on with the current one until it's perfect.

The general song would take 6-8 hours before it's arranged the way we want it. Some take more time to develop, some could be done in just 1 hour. But say 6-8 hours and when the arrangement is right. Then I'd add another 4 hours of rehearsing to get all the details right and everyone comfortable with the song. Here still bits and pieces will change slightley and new ideas appear.

That estimates to 20 hours per song before we have the arr, the details, it's tight, and rehearsed enough so it's comfortable to play. Then we could take it to the studio (which we have never done) and perform out parts without wasting studio time.
And that's 20 hours calendar time, not calculate what each and every individual spends writing lyrics, figuring out the difficult parts etc.

Of course you can go into the studio after 2 hours of you like. The problem with that as I see it is not to play it - studio dudes can cut, copy and paste . But the big issue is that a few weeks later you will think - man I would have wanted it this and that way instead, I'm not happy with the end result and it's my own fault since I hasted the process.

It happens that someone will hatch a bright idea long past the song was so to speak, "finished".


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Bogdan Radovic
post Mar 25 2008, 04:56 PM
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Well to the point you are confident and comfortable playing that song from the first till last note..You have to play very tightly in studio and no time for practicing there...So when you feel you are ready , go for it! smile.gif


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Mar 25 2008, 06:32 PM
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The amount of practice you need is related to how much you are good at executing the piece. If you can already play the recording piece tight then it you don't need to practice it for long till every note is perfect. And it needs to be perfect. Generally, some rule is to always play higher up the tempo perfect, so when you go into studio you can play lower tempo no problem.

This is if you already know what to play, but situation can be a little tricky if you need to do things as you go. If you need to record something as you go and make up things, it is necessary to be well rounded player with stamina, focus and accuracy, and often must use pull out all your skills, tricks and know-how to play a piece that is given to you.

This post has been edited by Milenkovic Ivan: Mar 25 2008, 06:32 PM


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Trond Vold
post Mar 25 2008, 07:29 PM
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When recording at home, i find the actual recording procedure to be good practice.
I record the track once, dont care if there's errors on it. Then i listen and analyze what i can improve on.
Then i re-record the track untill i'm happy with it.
This works perfectly for me, because i learn the track really well in the end with this procedure.

This post has been edited by Trond Vold: Mar 25 2008, 07:29 PM


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Marcus Siepen
post Mar 25 2008, 09:11 PM
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QUOTE (Trond Vold @ Mar 25 2008, 07:29 PM) *
When recording at home, i find the actual recording procedure to be good practice.
I record the track once, dont care if there's errors on it. Then i listen and analyze what i can improve on.
Then i re-record the track untill i'm happy with it.
This works perfectly for me, because i learn the track really well in the end with this procedure.


Funny, I do pretty much the same here at home, first I just record the basic ideas on hard disc, no matter if it is tight or played perfectly, and then I start forming this idea into the final version. When it comes to recording an album, well, as the others already mentioned, time is money in the studio, so you should practice as much as you can before going into the studio so you can play your parts as good as possible without using too much time.


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