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Fsgdjv
post Jul 4 2008, 12:28 PM
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QUOTE (RIP Dime @ May 7 2008, 04:12 AM) *
This specific plan is for the beginners-intermidiate, the ones who are just starting to learn alternate picking, check out Pavel's Alternate Picking 1 lesson, now take only the first 2 bars and focus you'r practicing on them, start off at 60 bpm, and if needed even slower, and focus mostly on you'r picking hand, making sure you alternate pick constantly, once you get alternate pick without thinking too much about it(should take a few times) you will be able to make a big leap in you'r bpm, I know you'r probably thinking it looks like a long way from 60 to 120, but trust me it isn't and you should be able to reach the 120 mark in a few days(for some it will take less, for some more).
Once you achieve that, switch to Pavel's Alternate Picking 2, again practicing only the first 2 or 3 bars, start at 60 bpm again, because it's a diffrent pattern and you need to adjust to alternate picking again(don't worry it will get easier later on), and do the same procedure you did with the first lesson, only that this time push yourself to the 130 bpm mark!
After youv'e done that, I bet you feel tired and ready to switch to something new and exciting, so now check out Muris's Alternate Picking lesson, "Wow, what do I do?, it's diffrent!" I hear you think to yourself, but worry not, pick a small section of the lesson(2 or 3 bars), and do as you did in the first two lesson, lower the tempo to a very comfortable speed(I lowerd it to 40 on some parts) and work you'r way up to a reachable goal, or until you get tired of the exercise and feel it's time to move on!


Are you being serious with the thing I quoted in bold letters? Because it took me a year to get to 125 bpm from 60 on pavels alternate picking 1 lesson. Am I missing something huge when it comes to alternate picking?


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Iluha
post Jul 4 2008, 12:38 PM
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QUOTE (Fsgdjv @ Jul 4 2008, 01:28 PM) *
Are you being serious with the thing I quoted in bold letters? Because it took me a year to get to 125 bpm from 60 on pavels alternate picking 1 lesson. Am I missing something huge when it comes to alternate picking?


Yeah I am serious.. Are you saying that it took you to go from 60 to 125 on only 2 bars? or on the entire lesson?


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Fsgdjv
post Jul 4 2008, 01:58 PM
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Not the entire lesson, but more than two bars, but still. And playing that bit I played of the lesson over and over so I play it steady for a few minutes without stopping.

Seriosuly, what am I missing here? 120 bpm took me a long time to even get my fingers able to move fast enough to play anything in sixteenth notes at.

EDIT: Also, would that mean it should only take a few weeks for a complete beginner to get to being able to play sixteenth notes in like 180 bpm or something else that's really fast? Even if it's just a few bars it sounds unrealistic, at least for me. But now I'm worried that I might have missed some stuff about this. I always thought speed was something that took time, and I can't undestand how a beginner can reach 120 bpm in just a few days.

This post has been edited by Fsgdjv: Jul 4 2008, 02:01 PM


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Iluha
post Jul 4 2008, 02:19 PM
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QUOTE (Fsgdjv @ Jul 4 2008, 02:58 PM) *
Not the entire lesson, but more than two bars, but still. And playing that bit I played of the lesson over and over so I play it steady for a few minutes without stopping.

Seriosuly, what am I missing here? 120 bpm took me a long time to even get my fingers able to move fast enough to play anything in sixteenth notes at.

EDIT: Also, would that mean it should only take a few weeks for a complete beginner to get to being able to play sixteenth notes in like 180 bpm or something else that's really fast? Even if it's just a few bars it sounds unrealistic, at least for me. But now I'm worried that I might have missed some stuff about this. I always thought speed was something that took time, and I can't undestand how a beginner can reach 120 bpm in just a few days.


No no it doesnt mean that at all. and I think I mentioned it in the guide, that after 120 bpm it gets significantly more difficult to progress.

Well everyone have their own pace, I know that for example it takes me much longer than others to progress in sweep picking, so for you it just takes longer to progress in alternate picking, so don't worry about it.

Also it might be that I'm badly mistaken in this case, becuase I first tackled alternate after I already had a few years of guitar playing under my belt.. so it might have come easier for me.. so I'll remove that part to not mislead anyone else.


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Fsgdjv
post Jul 4 2008, 05:20 PM
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QUOTE (Iluha @ Jul 4 2008, 03:19 PM) *
No no it doesnt mean that at all. and I think I mentioned it in the guide, that after 120 bpm it gets significantly more difficult to progress.

Well everyone have their own pace, I know that for example it takes me much longer than others to progress in sweep picking, so for you it just takes longer to progress in alternate picking, so don't worry about it.

Also it might be that I'm badly mistaken in this case, becuase I first tackled alternate after I already had a few years of guitar playing under my belt.. so it might have come easier for me.. so I'll remove that part to not mislead anyone else.


Well, I started to practice alternate picking after just a few months of playing, maybe that's why, idk. But I still would like to hear from others if I'm that much behind where I should be? I know everything is supposed to be individual etc, but I still want to be able to be good before I'm old. Anyone?


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Rated Htr
post Jul 4 2008, 11:58 PM
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Great Idea! I'll most certainly use this biggrin.gif


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Rhythm: Finnish Power Metal III: Nightwish
Legato: Ben's Land Of Legato
Alternate Picking: Alternate Picking Workout #5
Chords: Chord Melody Technique

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RIP Dime
post Jul 8 2008, 09:40 PM
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Posted by RIP Dime
Basic Metal/Rock Song Writing

This is for the people trying to get out of their beginner phase and trying write some songs, take what you learn here about riffs and apply them to your own songs. Think of these techniques as tools, barre chords, power chords, open chords, pedal notes, strumming patterns, chord progressions, tapping, basically every guitar technique under sun is a tool for you to use at your disposal when writing songs.

This is going to be structured a little differently than my normal lessons, I'm going to post lessons containing techniques that I think are either important or cool to use in songs, and explain some of their uses. I'm also separating them into 3 groups, increasing in difficulty to use in songs. So first watch the lesson, learn the technique, then read what I have to say about how to use it in a song. Or you can read the explanation first to see what you'll be doing with the technique. *Disclaimer: These are just easy, basic places, and ways to use these techniques, this is by no means the only way to go about writing, the possibilities are endless, this is just meant to help.

1)
Kris-Power Chords
Kris-Barre Chords
Lian-Death Metal
Toni-Octaves
Joe-Arpeggiated Chords
Joe-Firewind

Ok, here we go the meat and potatoes of songwriting. Firstly, metal and power chords go together like Americans and Hamburgers. Check out Kris' lesson for great explanations. Power chords, or 5 chords(example: A5) are very easy to use in riffs, you can see the use of them in Lian and Toni's lessons above. They are basically used to get a strong punch out of the amp, and they sound great with distortion. Palm muting a single power chord(usually a low chunky one), and playing it rhythmically can give you the basic metal breakdown, not great as a main riff, but it has it's place in a song's structure. Strumming 3 or 4 different power chords after each other is also an easy way to establish a chord progression, useful for a chorus, verse, or solo backing(listen to any pop punk song and you'll hear this somewhere). Or you can just let the power chords ring out one after another to create your popular power metal chorus riff. A basic progression you can use is I V VI IV, 1 5 6 4, or in the key of D: D5 A5 B5 G5 is great for pop punk or power metal. You can try any combination you like, and use it in your song. Those are a couple ways to use power chords to create very simple but effective parts of a song. Now crap on a donkey and give it your bowtie. (just seeing if anyone is reading this) tongue.gif
Barre chords can be used in a similar way to power chords, except they contain 1 more note, the 3rd, or the note that makes the chord minor or major. Try different combinations of these to make a progression by ear or you can go by a chord scales. Barre chords work great clean or distorted, so try both, and if you like the way they sound, use it! You can also create arpeggiated chords from barre chords, as shown in Joe's lesson above. Arpeggiated passages work great for any section of a song, really. Also look up finger picking, as this is a way of getting the arpeggios faster than with a pick, and also allows you to do more complex patterns.
*As you probably noticed, I've left out open chords, but as these should be one of the first things you learn I left out a lesson on it, but if you aren't familiar with open chords, look it up in the lessons section, or if you want a recommendation of how to learn it just let me know and I'll help you out. Open chords can be used in the same fashion as power, and barre chords, but allows you some freedom as you'll probably have a finger not assigned to a string, so it allows you to do some fancy legato, or maybe just to add a note here and there, but that is all just icing on the cake, and we're focusing on the baking of a cake here.
I added Joe's Firewind & Lian's lesson to display note pedalling, witch is a great way to establish key, and allows your left hand total freedom to add extra notes in between the pedal notes, or do like Lian did, and add power chords in between to make a sort of choppy chord progression, it doesn't establish a chord progression as clearly as just using chords, but it works. These riffs also work as easy backings to solo over in one scale. These work great as main riffs, but they also create this crawling, beastly vibe that can work anywhere you want that sound.
Octaves are easy to use for thick melody lines, as shown in Toni's lesson. These little octave riffs can be used again, anywhere, but are easiest to use as bridge riffs imo.


2)
A little harder here, I'd like to talk about melodies, these are ways for guitarists to voice their creativity is a way similar to the way vocalists do. There are many ways to play melodies, just search the word "melodies" in the lessons section and you'll see what I'm talking aboot(look I did it for you, how easy is this!), all of those lessons show ways that you can express yourself in a song. Now melodies can go almost anywhere in a song as well, you could actually make non repetitive melodies and use those in place of vocals! How crazy is that! But if you're looking for a place to put a melody, try a bridge, or chorus first. Melodies aren't actually techniques, they can contain basically any technique, but you can practice those on you own, melodies are the application. wink.gif

3)
Now I'm goin to talk about difficult techniques, these basically can take the basic, boring, tools I've talked about so far, and transform them into something unique and interesting.
David-Lead & Rhythm interaction
First up, lead and rhythm interaction, the concept here is more important than learning what is being played. Pretty self exclamatory, being that David explains it! laugh.gif But what I have to add here is be careful not to litter your songs with lead bits. Sometimes it is more fitting for you to step back and let the singer do some of the melody section stuff.
Lian-Prog
Now if you are the only guitar player you will have to master making riffs that can stand alone and be interesting. These palm muted one notes lines achieve this fairly easily. And for other techniques to make stand alone interesting riffs, I highly recommends delving into the expansive amount of prog lessons here(look, I've done it for you again! I should get a cookie). If you've come so far that you can play these lessons I'm pretty sure you can extract these techniques and apply them to your playing all by yourself! I know, it will be tough without my long winded explanations. sad.gif wink.gif But hey! if you're having a hard time, ask! Make a thread, we are all here for each other. One thing I would like to point out is the use of wierd diads, such as the b5 chords (ex: E:5 A:6 D:7), major diad (ex: E:5 A:4 D:7), minor diad (ex: E:5 A:3 D:7). You can take those shapes and move them around, also the note on the D string is just an octave of the root, so it's not nessicary to play that. Often you can use these in place of power chords to get a more washed out sound, and next time the riff comes around use the power chords, to give it more punch. But these can really open up the sound of your metal chug chug riffs. And really, adding all this "icing" to the cake really makes your music stand out, just make sure you have the "cake" or the meat of a good song, or there will be no nutritional value to the song, it will just be pretty. I'm not saying you have to conventionally structure your songs, because you don't, I guess what I'm saying is make the song have a purpose, nothing more.
Ok, now nearing the end.
If you got 2 guitar players, use them! Try not to have both of them playing the exact same thing all the time, or else it pretty much deafeats the purpose of having two. You can harmonize, you can have the guitars flowing in and out of each other, or have them complimenting each other, whatever the case, there is no point to having 2 guitar players if there is no dynamic between them, unless you just want the other guy to look pretty onstage! But you also don't want cacophony(the band and the term), well, I don't like that. Having the guitarists lock up at certain points yields great advantages as well, it can create a bigger contrast for the dynamic between them. I haven't really found a lesson yet that has two guitar players interacting with one another at the same time(other than lead, and rhythm guitars). But listen to Mastodon, Protest The Hero, Opeth, Testament, etc...and you'll get it.


4)
Lian-Power Metal Concepts
Ivan-Songwriting
I highly recommend these lessons to add to this lesson plan.
Have a nice day! biggrin.gif


This post has been edited by RIP Dime: Jul 9 2008, 01:40 AM


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Guitar1969
post Jul 9 2008, 01:00 AM
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QUOTE (Fsgdjv @ Jul 4 2008, 09:20 AM) *
Well, I started to practice alternate picking after just a few months of playing, maybe that's why, idk. But I still would like to hear from others if I'm that much behind where I should be? I know everything is supposed to be individual etc, but I still want to be able to be good before I'm old. Anyone?


One thing that confuses me when comparing speeds is doesn't the real speed actually depend on the note values you are playing, meaning somebody playing 16th notes at 120bmp is totally different than somebody playing 1/8th notes at 120bmp. Am I understanding it correctly - I started my musical life as a drummer so that may be where I am screwed up.


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RIP Dime
post Jul 9 2008, 01:43 AM
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QUOTE (Guitar1969 @ Jul 9 2008, 01:00 AM) *
One thing that confuses me when comparing speeds is doesn't the real speed actually depend on the note values you are playing, meaning somebody playing 16th notes at 120bmp is totally different than somebody playing 1/8th notes at 120bmp. Am I understanding it correctly - I started my musical life as a drummer so that may be where I am screwed up.


I think they were both talking about Pavel's lesson, witch consists of all 16th notes. So you're right, but I think you just missed that part. smile.gif


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Iluha
post Jul 9 2008, 08:11 AM
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Jeff(rip dime), if i could rate your guide, i would rate 15 out of 10!

Not only did you write an incredibly useful, intresting, and well structured guide that anyone can learn from, you also wrote a great guide on how to write a guide!

I know that when i will write another guide, i will use your guide as a template.

Thank you for this wonderful guide, and i'm looking forward to you'r next! smile.gif


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RIP Dime
post Jul 9 2008, 08:30 AM
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Thanks man, biggrin.gif that's nice to hear considering that it took 3 hours to get it done. But songwriting is a very broad topic, and I think I still have lots of ground to cover, I'm by no means an expirienced guitar player, so as I learn I will make more guides, and I hope to expand on songwriting the most, because I think it's the most important skill a musician can have. smile.gif


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Guitar1969
post Jul 9 2008, 05:57 PM
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QUOTE (RIP Dime @ Jul 8 2008, 05:43 PM) *
I think they were both talking about Pavel's lesson, witch consists of all 16th notes. So you're right, but I think you just missed that part. smile.gif


Yeah - I miseed that. It makes sense now. I haven't concentrated on speed yet, so it is something I will be tackling shortly


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Pablo Vazquez
post Jul 11 2008, 10:26 PM
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Fantastic topic!!!!! ...and cool ideas!


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Alexiaden93
post Dec 21 2009, 07:56 PM
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Alexiaden93's
LESSON PLAN


BEGINNER GUIDE
DEVELOPING ESSENTIAL SOLOING TECHNIQUES

LEVELS

2 - 6


Hello everybody. I have been looking at already made lesson plans and I've seen some very good ones so far. I would like to post a very thorough lesson plan for anybody who's somewhere around level 2 and wishes to get to somewhere around level 5. The lesson plan will consist of a PATH OF POPULARITY to follow, consisting of melodies incorporating several techniques and aspects of guitar playing, as well as a PATH OF ENLIGHTENMENT designed to develop one or two techniques - focusing on your weakness in other words.

I recommend you practise the lessons within each category following the order of appearance.







======= PATH OF POPULARITY =======

LESSONS WORTH PRACTISING




LEVEL 2

- Making Great Leads the Easy Way - David Wallimann (level 2) -

- Jumping Around - Beginner - Muris Varajic (level 2) -

- Minor vs Major - Beginner - Muris Varajic (level 2) -

- John Frusciante Style Lesson - Gabriel Leopardi (level 2) -

- Melodic Solo in Gm - Carlos Carrillo (level 2) -

- Slow Melody Lesson - David Wallimann (level 2) -

- Jazz Swing Lead Lesson - Muris Varajic (level 2) -



LEVEL 3

- Rock Solo - Beginner - Trond Vold (level 3) -

- Slow Soloing Lesson - Trond Vold (level 3) -

- Guitar Loves Piano - Piotr Kaczor (level 3) -

- Harmonic Minor for Beginners - Muris Varajic (level 3) -

- Pentatonic Licks - Beginner - Muris Varajic (level 3) -

- You Ready? - Collab Lesson - Marcus Lavendell (level 3) -



LEVEL 4

- Pentatonic Rock Cliches - Gabriel Leopardi (level 4) -

- Creating an Atmosphere - Ivan Zecic (level 4) -

- Volume Control - Phrasing - Piotr Kaczor (level 4) -

- Beginner Solo in D - Muris Varajic (level 4) -

- E Minor - Melodic Solo - Muris Varajic (level 4) -

- Iron Maiden Style Lesson - Gabriel Leopardi (level 4) -

- Combining Different Scale Positions - Ivan Zecic (level 4) -

- Epic Metal Rhythm Guitar - Lian Gerbino (level 4) -

- Themes from Quarterworlds of Fantasia - Emir Hot (level 4) -

- Eddie Van Halen Style - Muris Varajic (level 4) -

- Three Level Solo, Beginner - Marcus Lavendell (level 4) -

- Neoclassical Three-Level-Lesson - Beginner - Marcus Lavendell (level 4) -

- Nocturnal Visions - KMC Metal (level 4) -

- O Holy Night - Adolphe Adam - Marcus Lavendell (level 4) -



LEVEL 5

- Historical Failure - The Riffs - Marcus Lavendell (level 5) -

- Iron Maiden Style Lesson 2 - Gabriel Leopardi (level 5) -

- Hammer On Dude - Marcus Siepen (level 5) -

- Neoclassical Etude #1 - Marcus Lavendell (level 5) -

- John Petrucci Melodic Solo 2 - David Wallimann (level 5) -

- Slow Rock Guitar Solo - Jose Mena (level 5) -

- Heavy Metal Rhythm & Solo Exercise - Hisham Al-Sanea (level 5) -



LEVEL 6

- Steve Lukather Style Lesson - Muris Varajic (level 6) -

- Iron Maiden Masterclass - Gabriel Leopardi (level 6) -

- Iron Maiden: The Trooper - Gabriel Leopardi (level 6) -

- Neoclassical Etude #2 - Marcus Lavendell (level 6) -

- Paganini Inspiration - Lian Gerbino (level 6) -

- Jumping Around - Intermediate - Muris Varajic (level 6) -

- Neoclassical Three-Level-Lesson, Intermediate - Marcus Lavendell (level 6) -

- Three Level Solo, Intermediate - Marcus Lavendell (level 6) -








===== PATH OF ENLIGHTENMENT =====

TECHNIQUE & THEORY NEEDED




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - - - GETTING STARTED - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



KNOW YOUR GUITAR - (level 1)

- First Steps (series) - Andrew Cockburn -
In this series Andrew introduces you to the guitar world. Go through all of it:you know have the
opportunity to strengthen your terminology and basic knowledge to facilitate further learning.



ADJUSTING & SETTING UP YOUR GUITAR - (level 1)

- Guitar Tuning (tutorial) - Ivan Milenkovic -
- Restringing the Guitar (tutorial) - Ivan Milenkovic -
- Changing Pickups (tutorial) - Marcus Siepen -
Although this is an optional section, knowing how to fix your guitar will save you both time
and money, so I strongly recommend taking a look at these two tutorials.



SOFTWARES - (level 1)

- Exploring Guitar (tutorial) - Juan M. Valero -
- GuitarPro 5 -
Use these softwares to learn scales, chords and songs, and don't forget to compose music yourself;
this way you can apply your musical knowledge and adapt the song to your technical level.



STUDIO & RECORDING - (level 1)

- Recording Lessons 1 & 2 (tutorial) - Kyle Logue -
- GMC Video Recording (tutorial) - GMC Community -
Setting up your studio can be tricky, but with some advice, recording both audio and video
can become very simple. Here you can learn how to record audio (for songs) as well as video
(if you want to post something on YouTube or for the REC programme)



WARMING UP - (levels 2-3)

- Warming up (tutorial) - Marcus Siepen (level 2) -
- 3 Minutes Warmup (lesson) - Dejan Farkas (level 3) -
As explained very well by Marcus, warming up is crucial, both for your performance as well
as your hands' health. Warm-up strategies vary amongst musicians, so feel free to make your
own warm-up routine. Here is Chris Evans' warm-up schedule:
- Warming Up Etc, How I o it (forum) - Chris Evans -



FINGER WORKOUTS (levels 2-5)

- Right Hand Basics (series) - Danilo Capezzuto -
- Hands Synchronization (series) - Danilo Capezzuto -
These two lesson series are actually set at levels 3-5, but in my opinion they should
be used no matter what level you are at. If it's too difficult, slow down: the main thing
to remember is that these are exercises to build up strength and coordination in both hands.
- Finger Independence (series) - Danilo Capezzuto -
- Little Finger Work-out (lesson) - Dejan Farkas (level 2) -
- Pinky Exercise (lesson) - Sinisa Cekic (level 4) -
- Little Finger Etude (lesson) - Dejan Farkas (level 4) -





- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - - TECHNIQUES - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



ALTERNATE PICKING

- Speedpicking/alternate picking basics (101 - tutorial) - Kristofer Dahl (level 3) -
- Speedpicking/alternate picking practise patterns (101 - tutorial) - Kristofer Dahl (level 3) -
Make sure that you follow both of the lessons to understand how alternate picking works.
When you feel confident enough to carry on, here are a few lessons to develop your
technique by application.

- Alternate Picking - Thirds (lesson) - Muris Varajic (level 4) -
- Alternate Workout (lesson) - Muris Varajic (level 5) -
- Picking Exercise (lesson) - Trond Vold (level 5) -
- Alternate Picking - My Approach (lesson) - Jose Mena (level 8) -
Although Jose's lesson is rated level 8, his spoken video (#1) is very helpful,
and you can always practise the song at a lower tempo.



ECONOMY PICKING

- Economy Picking (series) - Danilo Capezutto -
- Economy Picking Mechanics (lesson) - David Wallimann (level 6) -
These lessons may seem advanced, but again: practise at low
speeds to get the general feel for the technique. Don't rush things.



SWEEPING

- Sweeping Basics (tutorial) - David Wallimann (level 4) -
- Sweeping Basics Lesson (tutorial) - Pavel Denisjuk (level 5) -
- Triad Arpeggios Etude (lesson) - Ivan Mihaljevic (level 5) -
- Sweep Picking Lesson - Muris Varajic (level 3) -



TAPPING
The lazy man's guide to speed.

- Tapping Lesson 1 - The Basics and Beyond (101 - tutorial) - Kristofer Dahl -
- Tapping Lesson 2 - Randy Rhoads style variations (101 - tutorial) - Kristofer Dahl -
- Tapping Lesson 3 - Two-Handed (101 - tutorial) - Kristofer Dahl -
- Clean Tapping Etude - Lian Gerbino (level 4) -
- Van Halen Tapping Style - Beginner (lesson) - Joe Kataldo (level 4) -
- Power Metal Tapping (lesson) - Lian Gerbino (level 5) -
- Tapping Lesson - Gabriel Leopardi (level 6) -



LEGATO

Legato is basically playing multiple notes without picking every note, creating a flow in your playing.
Legato can be sliding and bending, but most people think of hammer-ons and pull-offs.
Using legato you can play faster and smoother, but it takes time for your fingers to become
strong enough. You need to practise both hammer-ons and pull-offs before adding them together
to get a complete legato phrasing going on.

- Pull-offs Lesson - Muris Varajic (level 3) -
- Left Hand Only Exercise (lesson) - Dejan Farkas (level 4) -
- Legato Lesson - Muris Varajic (level 3) -
- Little Finger Etude (lesson) - Dejan Farkas (level 4) -
- Legato Exercise (lesson) - David Wallimann (level 5) -
- Legato Etude (lesson) - Pavel Denisjuk (level 6) -
- Legato and Picking (series) - Muris Varajic -



BENDING & VIBRATO

Have you seen Marcus Lavendell's videos ? If you have, then
you will probably know what a controlled vibrato will do to your
music. Start practising this technique, as well as bending, early on,
and you won't regret it.

- Vibrato (series) - Marcus Lavendell -
Check out part 1 of Lesson 3 in this series to hear what the master
has to say about vibrato.

- Classical Ballad Bending Techniques (lesson) - Ivan Milenkovic (level 4) -
- Hard Rock Bending & Vibrato - Ivan Mihaljevic (level 5) -
- Expressive Touch (lesson) - David Wallimann (level 5) -
Anything can be played with vibrato. Use it as much as possible, and remember:
USE YOUR WRIST AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE !
You will feel an almost tickling pain at first, but don't give up. With regular practice,
the pain will become smaller and eventually go away, at the same time as your
vibrato becomes more controlled and wide. Use a metronome, and stop if it becomes
painful. You need time to get used to the motion.

This post has been edited by Alexiaden93: Dec 28 2009, 02:04 PM


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Dec 21 2009, 08:43 PM
Post #55


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Wow, this is an awesome plan Alex, very nicely done. I will bookmark it! smile.gif


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Alexiaden93
post Dec 21 2009, 09:35 PM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Dec 21 2009, 08:43 PM) *
Wow, this is an awesome plan Alex, very nicely done. I will bookmark it! smile.gif

Thank you Ivan ! biggrin.gif I doubt it's going to help you, but sure happy.gif


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Lost in all the 2000+ GMC lessons? Check my Lesson Plan


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NoSkill
post Dec 21 2009, 09:40 PM
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This is quite good, Alex. Bravo!


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Alexiaden93
post Dec 21 2009, 09:42 PM
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QUOTE (NoSkill @ Dec 21 2009, 09:40 PM) *
This is quite good, Alex. Bravo!

Thanks a lot, Tom ! Hope it helps in some way smile.gif


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Fran
post Dec 21 2009, 10:02 PM
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Awesome Alex, I'll have this added to our wiki soon cool.gif


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Alexiaden93
post Dec 21 2009, 10:07 PM
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QUOTE (Fran @ Dec 21 2009, 10:02 PM) *
Awesome Alex, I'll have this added to our wiki soon cool.gif

Wow, thank you Fran ! biggrin.gif That would be a great honour, and I hope it helps somebody ! biggrin.gif


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Lost in all the 2000+ GMC lessons? Check my Lesson Plan


Guitars
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Yamaha Pacifica

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Marshall 15CDR, 45 watts


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