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> Breaking Into The Music Buisness., Let's discuss this important matter!
Iluha
post May 28 2008, 05:45 PM
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I think there might have been some topics about this in the past, but now that activity in the boards is risings with alot of new members, I thought it's time to discuss this again.

What are you'r views on succeeding as a musician? what do you think is required from one to break into this very large industry? what connections should you make? how to make them? should you compenscate in you'r song writing style? or is it better to just become a studio musician? etc.

All of the above as well as much others are all very important questions in my opinion, but I think that everyone will probably have diffrent answears, and this is what intrests me most, to see what are the diffrent takes on this here.

I personally don't really have a structured opinion on this subject so I won't say much right now, but as far as I got I can only say that in my opinion you probably won't get famous by being a solo musician(unless you'r a singer), and more probably is that you'r musical work may be heard and rememberd on various famous songs, but you'r own music won't really get out there, basiclly I think that these days if you want to make a living as a musician you will probably have to live with being a studio musician, music instructor, and other musical jobs not including preforming you'r own stuff.


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Canis
post May 28 2008, 06:00 PM
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It's my dream to work with music, so I'm subscribing to this thread to read all replies ^^

I've heard it's really hard to become a musician, especially in some countries..

This post has been edited by Canis: May 28 2008, 06:03 PM


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Henry Dietzel
post May 28 2008, 06:28 PM
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I have been playing in projects across the US since 18. I have never limited myself to one genre. Throughout my life I have heard many different avenues to explore for success as a musician. Jingle writing, studio work, original material, changing my instument, to name a few. Over the course of the last decade the web has exploded so much that I think the tables have turned a bit to cushion the musicians lifestyle. Not to far back you needed record labels, A&R reps, and lots of playing & promoting to get minimal recognition. Alot of artists are moving away from labels as I am sure you know and the labels seem to be pink slipping the reps that brought in the big acts prior. My thoughts also are that these reality "come to us" shows are trying to corner the market with little effort on their behalf and riding this reality buzz.

We should all take advantage of the internets abilities. The web provides world wide promotion for you as a musician. To me this doesn't mean post a youtube video and sit back. I think you still need to work very hard but the difference is you're able to do so from home with a click of a button.

I do agree with you that if you want to be a solo performer taking some singing lessons could prove to be beneficial.....it can never hurt to be able to utter a few words in key.

When you ask "should you compensate in your songs writing style?" I have never jeopardized my creative character when writing but there are keys elements involved when it comes to writing succesful music that I have followed. I constantly write 30 second segments and record them daily. You never know when a hook is going to pour out of you.

To sum it up in my opinion-copyright your original music, promoting it on the web is alot easier than touring a country.
I don't believe that being a studio musician is bad if you require a source of consitent income and want to stay in this business. The day I stop writing and recording my own music I will be dead.

This post has been edited by Hammerin Hank: May 28 2008, 06:39 PM


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Iluha
post May 28 2008, 06:46 PM
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QUOTE (Hammerin Hank @ May 28 2008, 07:28 PM) *
I have been playing in projects across the US since 18. I have never limited myself to one genre. Throughout my life I have heard many different avenues to explore for success as a musician. Jingle writing, studio work, original material, changing my instument, to name a few. Over the course of the last decade the web has exploded so much that I think the tables have turned a bit to cushion the musicians lifestyle. Not to far back you needed record labels, A&R reps, and lots of playing & promoting to get minimal recognition. Alot of artists are moving away from labels as I am sure you know and the labels seem to be pink slipping the reps that brought in the big acts prior. My thoughts also are that these reality "come to us" shows are trying to corner the market with little effort on their behalf and riding this reality buzz.

We should all take advantage of the internets abilities. The web provides world wide promotion for you as a musician. To me this doesn't mean post a youtube video and sit back. I think you still need to work very hard but the difference is you're able to do so from home with a click of a button.

I do agree with you that if you want to be a solo performer taking some singing lessons could prove to be beneficial.....it can never hurt to be able to utter a few words in key.

When you ask "should you compensate in your songs writing style?" I have never jeopardized my creative character when writing but there are keys elements involved when it comes to writing succesful music that I have followed. I constantly write 30 second segments and record them daily. You never know when a hook is going to pour out of you.

To sum it up in my opinion-copyright your original music, promoting it on the web is alot easier than touring a country.
I don't believe that being a studio musician is bad if you require a source of consitent income and want to stay in this business. The day I stop writing and recording my own music I will be dead.


But can you really make a large amout of money, comparing to the time of record labels, by promoting yourself online? I can see it happening in maybe 5 years when this "phenomenon" will be way to large to ignore, but right now?


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Atlantik
post May 28 2008, 06:58 PM
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.

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Henry Dietzel
post May 28 2008, 07:24 PM
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QUOTE (Iluha @ May 28 2008, 01:46 PM) *
But can you really make a large amout of money, comparing to the time of record labels, by promoting yourself online? I can see it happening in maybe 5 years when this "phenomenon" will be way to large to ignore, but right now?

My opinion, and again it is only my opinion, if you put together a portfolio of all promotional tools it will be hard to ignore you once you have developed a fan base. Think about this, if you have a good catalog of well recorded original tracks (copywritten of course) and you exhaust every site you can ie; GMC (of course), personal site, band site, wiki site, myspace, youtube, etc. and archive every email address you come across than the rest is up to your material. Also, if you are playing out put a hot girl in the crowd with a clipboard writing down email address' that is always helpful. This will help increase the number contacts you can establish. I have found people like being involved with musicians so put some people in charge of certain tasks once you get things up and running. I think once you do the leg work and develop a decent fan base and a reasonable download of your music you can attempt to shop your project to the big wigs. You then have some control over them wanting you instead of you needing them.

Depending on how hard you want to work I believe you will see $$ if your material holds water. If no ones buying and you want to try to still make a living off music than maybe studio work is the best avenue you have....at least you know you gave it your best effort.

QUOTE (Atlantik @ May 28 2008, 01:58 PM) *
It would be to; not do it for the purpose of making money,
and second, I think it's more important to actually be good at what you do, rather than being famous.


This I agree with, I write music because it keeps me sane and I like to believe I am half way decent at it. I agree it is important to focus on being the best you can at it but making a living doing something you love is pricless. The whole famous thing I haven't been on board with since I was young. I'd rather be underground or behind the scenes and able to pay my bills.


This post has been edited by Hammerin Hank: May 28 2008, 07:26 PM


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Jenkinson
post May 28 2008, 10:07 PM
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I know about two dozen people who went to college and majored in music, with the intent of making a living by playing music. When I questioned them about majoring in music they all tell me the same thing, do it if you dont mind being poor.

With this said I think it is fair to say, if you want to make it big in the music industry and make millions of dollars, you have to know the right people, and thats it.

If you are in it for the love of music, as you should be if you are pursuing it as a career, then it is relatively easy to "break into the industry" by starting a band or a set, and prefoming at local events/venues in your area, until you gain recognition and can start playing outside of your area (city, state, whatever).


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audiopaal
post May 31 2008, 11:04 AM
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QUOTE (Atlantik @ May 28 2008, 07:58 PM) *
I have two things in mind for the whole "getting into the industry matter"..

It would be to; not do it for the purpose of making money,

and second, I think it's more important to actually be good at what you do, rather than being famous.



And yes of course most of us want our work/skills to be known and admired but yeah, I was just sharing some thoughts on the subject. smile.gif


Wise words smile.gif
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Nemanja Filipovi...
post May 31 2008, 02:05 PM
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I think that being the great, or good musician is not enough,I that you need to be a round the people in the buisness and wait for your chance.There is luck also,and being very,very patient,and
always hope.smile.gif


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Ivan Milenkovic
post May 31 2008, 06:20 PM
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Lot and lot of hard work is needed to be able to go into serious music waters and stay there. But when a man is persistent and good at what he does, he deserves a chance and others will notice it at some point.

This post has been edited by Ivan Milenkovic: May 31 2008, 06:21 PM


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FrankW
post May 31 2008, 06:28 PM
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Being an excellent, or original, player is not enough. The key is marketing yourself as aggressively as you can. This includes Youtube, guitar contests, gigging with a band, networking with other musicians, making demos, becoming a studio musician, and generally getting the word out any way you can think of. There's a lot of good players out there. To get a leg up on them, you must promote yourself, any way you can!
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Marcus Siepen
post Jun 1 2008, 05:25 PM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ May 31 2008, 07:20 PM) *
Lot and lot of hard work is needed to be able to go into serious music waters and stay there. But when a man is persistent and good at what he does, he deserves a chance and others will notice it at some point.


I agree. If you want to survive in this business you will have to work very hard. A bit of luck and some good contacts won't help you much, specially not if you intend to survive for more than just one year. You have to believe in yourself, stay true to yourself, believe in what you are doing, and you have to always try to deliver the best you can, then you have a chance.


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Nemanja Filipovi...
post Jun 1 2008, 05:28 PM
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QUOTE (Marcus Siepen @ Jun 1 2008, 06:25 PM) *
I agree. If you want to survive in this business you will have to work very hard. A bit of luck and some good contacts won't help you much, specially not if you intend to survive for more than just one year. You have to believe in yourself, stay true to yourself, believe in what you are doing, and you have to always try to deliver the best you can, then you have a chance.

Words of wisdom and experience,thanks for the great advices Marcus.


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Rated Htr
post Jun 1 2008, 05:57 PM
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I created a topic in the chill room that resembles this one in a way.
I can't really tell people how to succeed since that's what I want to do, I want to live depending on music, I don't need to be famous or popular, I just want music to be my job and provide me the enough I need to live a happy life smile.gif


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