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urbanmonkey
post Jul 17 2008, 12:58 PM
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I was wondering which scale or scales I should spend the majority of my time studying. I haven't been playing a long time but I've started with the major scale. But most rock solos and what not seems to be utilizing the pentatonic scale. Any suggestions would be much appreciated.
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Caelumamittendum
post Jul 17 2008, 01:02 PM
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First: Welcome to the site! smile.gif

Secondly: I found when I was working on such, that it was a great help first knowing the minor pentatonic scale. Let's say in Am, as that is fairly easy to remember and cope with. Then I would play something only using that one box, and ever so slowly expand that box, sometimes I would then use the A on the 2nd fret of the G string and the E on the G string. Same notes, but I expanded the boxes. I would do the same thing upwards, slowly building full knowledge on the fretboard (which I still find hard in certain keys...)


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Matt23
post Jul 17 2008, 01:05 PM
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I think the modes are good scales to practice.
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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jul 17 2008, 01:43 PM
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First you should introduce yourself to minor pentatonic scale, and them move on to modes. In modes you will find most of the stuff needed for playing mainstream (western) music.


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Bogdan Radovic
post Jul 19 2008, 06:29 PM
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I would start by learning the major scale and intervals, and than modes and how to apply them..Also minor scale (and pentatonic versions) are great start for instant jamming smile.gif


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kjutte
post Jul 19 2008, 06:38 PM
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QUOTE (urbanmonkey @ Jul 17 2008, 01:58 PM) *
I was wondering which scale or scales I should spend the majority of my time studying. I haven't been playing a long time but I've started with the major scale. But most rock solos and what not seems to be utilizing the pentatonic scale. Any suggestions would be much appreciated.


The major scale, (because almost all diatonic scales are derived from it.)
Also, what will make you understand scale positioning, is chord progression lessons.

So, agenda:
Learn the 7 majorscale boxes, and the 7 chord progressions for it.

Example, C major.

Cmaj Dmin Emin Fmaj G maj A maj and Bdim

Ionian, dorian, phrygian, lydian, mixolydian, aeolian and locrian positions of the scale.

The reason for the various maj's and min's is that

Ionian=natural major
Dorian=minor
Phrygian=minor
Lydian=major
Mixolydian=Major (kind of)
aeolian=natural minor
Locrian=Diminished (because of the flat5)

Maybe a bit more than you asked for, but write it up and try smile.gif
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jacmoe
post Jul 19 2008, 07:21 PM
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I agree with kjutte! smile.gif

Learn the Major scale, and learn it well.

I'll only go downhill from there: change one note and you're playing Harmonic Minor, change two and you're in Melodic Minor, and so on.

wink.gif


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kjutte
post Jul 19 2008, 07:26 PM
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QUOTE (jacmoe @ Jul 19 2008, 08:21 PM) *
I agree with kjutte! smile.gif

Learn the Major scale, and learn it well.

I'll only go downhill from there: change one note and you're playing Harmonic Minor, change two and you're in Melodic Minor, and so on.

wink.gif


And even take two away, and you'll have pentatonic biggrin.gif
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Xose Pineda
post Jul 20 2008, 02:54 AM
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In my opinion... pentatonics it's the first thing to learn.

Ivan's pentatonic series lesson is extremely good to learn fast and well.

Cheers!


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kjutte
post Jul 20 2008, 08:48 AM
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QUOTE (Xose Pineda @ Jul 20 2008, 03:54 AM) *
In my opinion... pentatonics it's the first thing to learn.

Ivan's pentatonic series lesson is extremely good to learn fast and well.

Cheers!


Thing though, is that pentatonics are derived from the major scale. This often mix stuff up.
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jacmoe
post Jul 20 2008, 10:18 AM
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I would say: learn both.
Start with both the pentatonics and the major scale.
Divide your playing time equally between them.

If you feel that the sound of the major scale is boring or alien to you, go Aolian (natural minor) - a mode of the major scale.
It suits the sound of the minor pentatonic.


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QUOTE ("Steve Vai")
Start by playing something - a bend, a riff, a scale, a song - very slowly; if you make a mistake, start over; do this over and over, until you can play it flawlessly - and I do mean flawlessly - many times in a row. Next, gradually increase the tempo. Eventually you'll be flailing like a madman.
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kjutte
post Jul 20 2008, 01:53 PM
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QUOTE (jacmoe @ Jul 20 2008, 11:18 AM) *
I would say: learn both.
Start with both the pentatonics and the major scale.
Divide your playing time equally between them.

If you feel that the sound of the major scale is boring or alien to you, go Aolian (natural minor) - a mode of the major scale.
It suits the sound of the minor pentatonic.


Well, to just "go" aeolian, you'd have to know the chords of your backingtrack also.

Anyway, if you know all your major boxes, you'll quickly recognize the pentatonic positions in it.
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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jul 20 2008, 05:32 PM
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QUOTE (kjutte @ Jul 20 2008, 09:48 AM) *
Thing though, is that pentatonics are derived from the major scale. This often mix stuff up.


Pentatonic scale is not derived from major scale. It existed in many cultures all around the world, in many of them, not connected to major scale at all. Pentatonic is just another scale that mixed with other scales that were predominant in various historical periods, and because of its simplicity she stuck around and helped to shape the music as we know it today.


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kjutte
post Jul 20 2008, 10:41 PM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Jul 20 2008, 06:32 PM) *
Pentatonic scale is not derived from major scale. It existed in many cultures all around the world, in many of them, not connected to major scale at all. Pentatonic is just another scale that mixed with other scales that were predominant in various historical periods, and because of its simplicity she stuck around and helped to shape the music as we know it today.


Either way it contains 5 notes of the minor scale, so it can easily be spotted in its patterns.
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jacmoe
post Jul 21 2008, 12:22 AM
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The reason I recommend starting with Aeolian and the Minor Pentatonic is that the match each other quite well.
Many rock musicians mix both, Kirk Hammett is one of them. wink.gif


--------------------
QUOTE ("Steve Vai")
Start by playing something - a bend, a riff, a scale, a song - very slowly; if you make a mistake, start over; do this over and over, until you can play it flawlessly - and I do mean flawlessly - many times in a row. Next, gradually increase the tempo. Eventually you'll be flailing like a madman.
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kjutte
post Jul 21 2008, 12:51 AM
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QUOTE (jacmoe @ Jul 21 2008, 01:22 AM) *
The reason I recommend starting with Aeolian and the Minor Pentatonic is that the match each other quite well.
Many rock musicians mix both, Kirk Hammett is one of them. wink.gif


Totally agree man. A really cool way to mix them even better together, is to add a 6th note to it in addition. Shawn Lane did that alot, and it sounds sooo sweet!

2nd note that is, btw.
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Paul Coutts
post Jul 22 2008, 11:24 PM
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Check out Frank Gambale's Chopbuilder. It's got a fantastic modes workout in it that I'm starting to use.
I'd post it, but that'd be illegal smile.gif
I'll tell you how it goes though:

It's incredibly simple, but you'll hear the differences in the scales, which is really important.
1. Pick a key... say, G.
2. Play G Ionian, up one octave, then down.
3. Play G Dorian, up one octave, then down.
4. Play G Phrygian......

And so on, try it out.
Cheers!


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