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> Pentatonic Scales
matrixjones
post Aug 10 2006, 02:03 AM
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Hi All... Just one or two questions about Pentatonic Scales...

1 --> What are Pentatonic scales? What am I Supposed to understand when seeing this? I never saw these before so I would like to have a little help please! Thanks!



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sammy_k
post Aug 13 2006, 12:07 PM
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Well, to get a first idea about scales, I suggest to search on google. Seriously, this will lead you to alot of websites with information about scales. I've just started playing the guitar, so I won't confuse you with my explanation. I'll leave it to other guys on this forum.

I did a quick search and this might help you:

http://www.worldguitar.com/pentatonic1.html
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/sca...nic_scales.html
http://www.theorylessons.com/pentatonics.html
http://www.geocities.com/trollstjerne/pentatonic.html

There must be more easy information on the internet, more suitable for beginners, which I think you are? I don't know if this information is 100% accurate, just read it to get into it. I'm sure the more experienced guitarist over here will be able to explain it more in depth.

Kind regards,
Sammy

Update: http://www.cyberfret.com/scales/index.php can help too. Just read it through and see if you start getting the idea or not.
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matrixjones
post Aug 14 2006, 12:49 AM
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Thanks a lot I'll chez out the stuff You gave me!

/Mat*Nes


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sammy_k
post Aug 17 2006, 11:58 AM
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I hope those links helped you.

I have a question for everyone at GMC.
I want to start trying out the pentatonic scales, but I'm looking for a website that clearly shows how to play them (with graphics and video's).

I want to know how I should play them with my fretting hand, because I feel it's kind of hard to make the stretch I need.

I'd like to know where my left hand's thumb should be when playing pentatonic scales. Also, when looking at video's, the guitarist's fingers are almost vertical. Sometimes the left hand can be positioned in a certain angle. It's kind of hard to explain.

So what I'd like to know, how do YOU play pentatonic scales (concerning the position of the fretting hand). What position of your hand, thumb etc you find the most comfortable way to play them?
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Tank
post Aug 17 2006, 04:39 PM
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QUOTE (sammy_k)
I'd like to know where my left hand's thumb should be when playing pentatonic scales. Also, when looking at video's, the guitarist's fingers are almost vertical. Sometimes the left hand can be positioned in a certain angle. It's kind of hard to explain.

So what I'd like to know, how do YOU play pentatonic scales (concerning the position of the fretting hand). What position of your hand, thumb etc you find the most comfortable way to play them?


Where should your thumb be? Basically, whenever it comes down to it wherever is comfortable is the "right place". Players will move their thumbs depending on what lick they're playing, to and from the "thumb over the top" to "thumb on the back" lots of times during a solo.

Personally, I usually try to practice with my thumb tip in the centre of the neck, with "vertical fingers" as you had mentioned. But I know that when I'm playing on stage, that my thumb moves all over the place, subconciously.

Might I advise that you should perhaps try and concentrate on what position you can put your hand so that it does not tense up. This will help you develop a relaxed light touch with your fingers on the frets. The common issue for players is pressing down on the strings too hard. This can arise mainly from tense left hand. Developing a sense of "putting just enough pressure on the string" is the real key to playing well. If you get this eventually it wont matter where you put your thumb.

/T
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sammy_k
post Aug 23 2006, 12:37 PM
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Thanks for the tips Tank.
Just another small question: when 'boxes' are mentioned regarding pentatonic scales, what does it really mean?

Does someone has a graphic or website that contains visualisations of all pentatonic scales? So far I've found bits and pieces on the web smile.gif I'm in need of a website/tutorial/DVD that covers it all. Or at least alot smile.gif
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Tank
post Aug 23 2006, 04:35 PM
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QUOTE (sammy_k)
Thanks for the tips Tank.
Just another small question: when 'boxes' are mentioned regarding pentatonic scales, what does it really mean?

Does someone has a graphic or website that contains visualisations of all pentatonic scales? So far I've found bits and pieces on the web smile.gif I'm in need of a website/tutorial/DVD that covers it all. Or at least alot smile.gif


Imagine a fretboard, with 24 frets and 6 strings. Lets take the scale of A minor pentatonic. There are 5 notes in the scale A C D E and G. If you were to try and find all occurances of ACDEG on the neck, you'd find 65. Thats 65 frets you need to randomly learn.

It's going to be much easier if you split those 65 notes into positions, or "boxes". Lets say my hand is in one place on the fretboard, for instance. my first finger is at the fifth fret. How many ACDEG's can I find, across the strings, without moving up or down the neck? Not so easy to think that quick!! :think

Now look at the graphic that matrixjones posted at the top of this topic, and study the A minor pentatonic scale (top line). Notice how the notes are split into boxes at two areas of the neck? The notes aren't all randomly all over the fretboard, they seem pretty much contained. In fact these two boxes of notes, all the occurances of ACDEG's, that you can play across the strings, when your hand is at the 5th fret, and again when you move your hand up to the 12th fret

With the minor pentatonic scale there are 5 common "boxes" that are used to digest the scale more easily. If you learn the ones posted at the top of this topic, you only have 3 more to go!!

As to where you'll find them all:
https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/memberson.../Hot_blues1.htm
bottom of the page !!


smile.gif

/T
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matrixjones
post Aug 23 2006, 04:37 PM
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I don't know if that's what you're looking for but there is a Site I found and they show all possible scales ( I think ).

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php


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texasamp
post Aug 26 2006, 07:21 PM
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As tank said in his previous post is all so true. Five notes... connect the dots all over the neck. Do not play in the key of B on the 7th fret always.

I work on a lot of open string licks in keys of E an A. They are very fast as you pull off/hammer on a lot. Also alternate precise picking as well.

My hand position changes a small bit. It is my style playing is why. I often use my thumb curved around the top of the neck to hit root notes on the 5th and 6th strings.

I do a lot of full bends, and at times I will bend all the way up to 4 frets. When doing these bends I use my palm and 2 or maybe 3 fingers behind my ring finger to help bend the string on up to pitch while using vibrato.

I use 11 thru 52 gauge Ernie Ball strings and do not detune so it is a bit painfull at times. But when your adrenalin is flowing you'll be surprized what you can do on stage.

Kind Regards,
Darrell-
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sammy_k
post Sep 29 2006, 09:50 AM
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Thank you for your advice guys. I've been away for a few months and haven't been able to pick up my guitar for various reasons. I'll get my first amp within a few weeks, so I can finally begin learning how to play seriously.
There has been a 2 and a half month delay, but i'm ready to rock once I'll have an amp!

Cheers
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texasamp
post Sep 29 2006, 04:44 PM
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QUOTE (sammy_k)
There has been a 2 and a half month delay, but i'm ready to rock once I'll have an amp!

Cheers

Who says you need an amp to practice? :]

Good luck,
Darrell-
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sammy_k
post Oct 8 2006, 11:37 AM
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Well, without an amp you can practice too, but it's not the same smile.gif A guy I know would go to some stores with me to test a few amps. I just want to buy an amp I like, and because I'm a total beginner at the moment, I want someone with me who can play any style etc so I can hear the amp well smile.gif Some serious testing. Maybe I should just buy a Marshall DSL 401 without anyone trying it out for me tongue.gif The guy works alot and when he's at home, I'm at school so

:think
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InstruMental Cas...
post Oct 8 2006, 05:59 PM
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QUOTE (sammy_k)
I'm in need of a website/tutorial/DVD that covers it all. Or at least alot


Any little beginners practice amp is suitable. You can get plenty of sounds and styles out of any amplifier. There’s no need to overcomplicate things when all you’re doing is buying a beginners amp. Just go to a Guitar Center or something, and ask one of the salesmen to give you a demonstration because you’re a beginner and you’d like to see some of what the amp can do.

Okay, now I’ll do my best to explain how you play the very first A minor pentatonic box scale…

Begin by watching THIS VIDEO I just filmed for you.

As the guys above me have said, they call it a “box” scale because the sequence of notes that you play sort of draw the shape of a square. That’s not something to obsess over though. You’ll understand it simply by playing the scales.

Let me start by simply breaking down how you read the very first scale position:



You would “read” this scale much like a book, from the left to the right, but scales are different from books because you can start from the top line or from the bottom. A scale can be played starting on the high E or on the low E, and played up or down the neck. For this example, you’ll start on the lowest line of this image – the 6th string (the low E string) – and play the first dot (which is colored red because it’s an A note, so it has special significance in the A minor scale we’re playing), which is on the 5th fret of the 6th string.

Play the 5th fret of the 6th string with your index finger, and then play the 8th fret of the 6th string with your pinky finger. Now we move up one line to the 5th string. Play the 5th fret of the 5th string with your index finger, and then play the 7th fret of the 5th string with your ring finger. And so on... Once you get to the top-right of the image - the 1st string (the high E string) on the 8th fret - you've reached the end of the scale, and now you can practice playing it in reverse.

This is what the whole scale looks like in tab form:



You should practice alternate picking the scale when you play it. That means you start with a down pick or with an up pick, and then you play the next note with the opposite pick stroke (so if you played the first note with a down pick, then you’d play the following note with an up pick). If you want to work on your alternate picking, practice playing through the whole scale starting with a down pick, and then once you’ve played through the entire scale with alternate picking, begin playing through it all over again but this time begin with an up pick instead.

Okay, I think that's enough for now. Feel free to reply with any questions you might have, but remember not to overcomplicate things. You don’t need an amp to practice this basic stuff, and you don’t need to play everything perfectly right away. Just get comfortable with it by simply playing, instead of trying to understand 10,000 concepts about it first. Oh, and remember that when you’re fretting notes, you usually do so by pressing down on the string with the TIP of your fingers. That doesn't mean the nail - it just means the top of your finger.



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Kristofer Dahl
post Oct 9 2006, 04:56 PM
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WOW! biggrin.gif That has to be the most thorouhly answer I have seen in aforum yet... (considered the use of video, images and text...)

well done Instrumental Case, or should I say mr suck...? (joke)

/Kris smile.gif
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InstruMental Cas...
post Oct 9 2006, 10:35 PM
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You’re not the first person to call me Mr. Suck. :oops:


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Kristofer Dahl
post Oct 9 2006, 10:51 PM
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QUOTE (InstruMental Case)
You’re not the first person to call me Mr. Suck.  :oops:


That's of course a choice you are making when creating Guitars Sucks. But hey I was number one in the last guitars suck - must mean I suck the worse?? >:<
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sammy_k
post Oct 13 2006, 09:37 PM
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QUOTE (InstruMental Case)
QUOTE (sammy_k)
I'm in need of a website/tutorial/DVD that covers it all. Or at least alot


Any little beginners practice amp is suitable. You can get plenty of sounds and styles out of any amplifier. There’s no need to overcomplicate things when all you’re doing is buying a beginners amp. Just go to a Guitar Center or something, and ask one of the salesmen to give you a demonstration because you’re a beginner and you’d like to see some of what the amp can do.

Okay, now I’ll do my best to explain how you play the very first A minor pentatonic box scale…

Begin by watching THIS VIDEO I just filmed for you.

As the guys above me have said, they call it a “box” scale because the sequence of notes that you play sort of draw the shape of a square. That’s not something to obsess over though. You’ll understand it simply by playing the scales.

Let me start by simply breaking down how you read the very first scale position:



You would “read” this scale much like a book, from the left to the right, but scales are different from books because you can start from the top line or from the bottom. A scale can be played starting on the high E or on the low E, and played up or down the neck. For this example, you’ll start on the lowest line of this image – the 6th string (the low E string) – and play the first dot (which is colored red because it’s an A note, so it has special significance in the A minor scale we’re playing), which is on the 5th fret of the 6th string.

Play the 5th fret of the 6th string with your index finger, and then play the 8th fret of the 6th string with your pinky finger. Now we move up one line to the 5th string. Play the 5th fret of the 5th string with your index finger, and then play the 7th fret of the 5th string with your ring finger. And so on... Once you get to the top-right of the image - the 1st string (the high E string) on the 8th fret - you've reached the end of the scale, and now you can practice playing it in reverse.

This is what the whole scale looks like in tab form:



You should practice alternate picking the scale when you play it. That means you start with a down pick or with an up pick, and then you play the next note with the opposite pick stroke (so if you played the first note with a down pick, then you’d play the following note with an up pick). If you want to work on your alternate picking, practice playing through the whole scale starting with a down pick, and then once you’ve played through the entire scale with alternate picking, begin playing through it all over again but this time begin with an up pick instead.

Okay, I think that's enough for now. Feel free to reply with any questions you might have, but remember not to overcomplicate things. You don’t need an amp to practice this basic stuff, and you don’t need to play everything perfectly right away. Just get comfortable with it by simply playing, instead of trying to understand 10,000 concepts about it first. Oh, and remember that when you’re fretting notes, you usually do so by pressing down on the string with the TIP of your fingers. That doesn't mean the nail - it just means the top of your finger.



Thank you InstruMental Case for the time you've put in explaining how to play it. I was a bit unsure how to put the top of my fingers when playing such a scale. Think I just have to practice practice and practice and not worry that much. Thanks alot.

And Kris too for the metronome video smile.gif Was just what I needed smile.gif
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Liam
post Oct 14 2006, 02:01 PM
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Wow , Instrumental Case , You have a real sexy voice , more sexy then kris his .Sorry Kris .And Im NOT GAY.
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PickNGrin
post Oct 14 2006, 02:25 PM
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I just caught the video, the 7 string makes it interesting, you dont see as many lessons around for 7 string. You could have added the minor pentatonic notes in that pattern for string 7 too. Just it would not apply to 6 string.
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ezravdb
post Oct 15 2006, 11:40 AM
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QUOTE (Liam)
Wow , Instrumental Case , You have  a real sexy voice , more sexy then kris his .Sorry Kris .And Im NOT GAY.


actually you are xD


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