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> Something I Learned This Week
Vinni Smith
post Aug 9 2008, 02:32 AM
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Hi everyone. Vinni Smith here.

I have spent a lifetime playing guitar. I don't get to practice as much as I would like to , so I get in a few minutes or hours here and there when ever I can. I am like a sponge, however, when I am around anyone with cool ideas. I was taking some picks to one of our local music stores last week and saw my old friend Gordon Kennedy. He is a wonderfull guitar player, and is also a magnificent piano, bass, and horn artist as well. The guy really knows his stuff. Anyway, I was sharing some of the things I learned from the last Robben Ford clinic I attended and he showed me a cool little trick for some jazzy sounding I-IV-V Blues. I would like to pass this on to you if I may.

It is a real simple trick and I cannot believe I have not learned it years ago. Simply play the major IV scale over each chord you are playing on. For instance, we are in A. So, we have A - D - E. Right? When the band is playing over the A chord, you simply solo in the IV chord scale which would be, of course, D. So while the band is playing A, you solo in D Major scale. Then when the band goes to the D or IV chord, you solo in the IV of D which would be G. Got me so far? Then the band goes back to A and you go back to D Major scale. Then when the band goes to the IV chord which would be E, you go to the IV chord of E, A Major scale!

I know this sounds too easy and too good to be true, but it works! You are mostly playing all the same notes you normally would play, however, since you are thinking about them in a different key, you tend to play things that you would not usually play. It has a cool, jazzy feel and sound. It is very easy to do, if you simply know your major scales.

I have been having a good time with this principle this week. Try it out and let me know what you come up with...........

Vinni


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skennington
post Aug 9 2008, 03:04 AM
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Very interesting and simplistic approach to soloing Vinnie, thanks for the "tip". tongue.gif smile.gif


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Ian Bushell
post Aug 9 2008, 08:35 AM
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That's great Vinni, thanks for sharing smile.gif

This post has been edited by Ian Bushell: Aug 9 2008, 08:35 AM


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Aug 9 2008, 10:33 AM
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Nice approaach Vinni, mixing scales while playing is very important. In it's basics nature blues progression is major, but what makes it bluesy is minor scale, so proper use of minor scales is also very important.


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Bogdan Radovic
post Aug 9 2008, 11:34 AM
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Thanks for sharing this cool tip! smile.gif


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Vinni Smith
post Aug 9 2008, 03:07 PM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Aug 9 2008, 10:33 AM) *
Nice approaach Vinni, mixing scales while playing is very important. In it's basics nature blues progression is major, but what makes it bluesy is minor scale, so proper use of minor scales is also very important.



That's the cool thing about this little trick. It turns very minor-ish on the four chord if you follow the simple pattern.

Speaking of using minors, a lot of times when playing blues I like to stay on the major side of the tonic while on the I chord, and then during the IV chord go into the bluesy, minor pentatonic but only during the Iv chord. Then just a full blown IV chord during that one. This is also very effective and simple. Goes along with what you were referring to Ivan.

Vinni


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Tyler Holmes
post Aug 9 2008, 10:04 PM
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thats pretty cool...
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Marcus Siepen
post Aug 10 2008, 09:36 PM
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very nice tip, thanks smile.gif


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Matt23
post Aug 10 2008, 09:40 PM
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I'll give this a shot, thanks for the tip Vinni. smile.gif
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Toni Suominen
post Aug 10 2008, 10:30 PM
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Thanks for the tip Vinni, sounds really good and useful! smile.gif


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Fran
post Aug 11 2008, 12:12 AM
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I have to give this a try, as a matter of fact it will be a good exercise to start learning to change keys while I jam over a backing, thanks Vinni!


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Jesse
post Aug 11 2008, 07:14 AM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Aug 9 2008, 11:33 AM) *
Nice approaach Vinni, mixing scales while playing is very important. In it's basics nature blues progression is major, but what makes it bluesy is minor scale, so proper use of minor scales is also very important.

the pentatonic scale:D


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Guitar1969
post Aug 11 2008, 08:12 PM
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QUOTE (Vinni Smith @ Aug 8 2008, 06:32 PM) *
Hi everyone. Vinni Smith here.

I have spent a lifetime playing guitar. I don't get to practice as much as I would like to , so I get in a few minutes or hours here and there when ever I can. I am like a sponge, however, when I am around anyone with cool ideas. I was taking some picks to one of our local music stores last week and saw my old friend Gordon Kennedy. He is a wonderfull guitar player, and is also a magnificent piano, bass, and horn artist as well. The guy really knows his stuff. Anyway, I was sharing some of the things I learned from the last Robben Ford clinic I attended and he showed me a cool little trick for some jazzy sounding I-IV-V Blues. I would like to pass this on to you if I may.

It is a real simple trick and I cannot believe I have not learned it years ago. Simply play the major IV scale over each chord you are playing on. For instance, we are in A. So, we have A - D - E. Right? When the band is playing over the A chord, you simply solo in the IV chord scale which would be, of course, D. So while the band is playing A, you solo in D Major scale. Then when the band goes to the D or IV chord, you solo in the IV of D which would be G. Got me so far? Then the band goes back to A and you go back to D Major scale. Then when the band goes to the IV chord which would be E, you go to the IV chord of E, A Major scale!

I know this sounds too easy and too good to be true, but it works! You are mostly playing all the same notes you normally would play, however, since you are thinking about them in a different key, you tend to play things that you would not usually play. It has a cool, jazzy feel and sound. It is very easy to do, if you simply know your major scales.

I have been having a good time with this principle this week. Try it out and let me know what you come up with...........

Vinni


Its official now - Vinni is one us GMCers whos going to be addicted to the GMC Forum. Actually this is a a nice simplistic tip. I've never been one to switch scales over the specific chord in the progression, but know its important but this is a simple idea to start doing so.

Thanks again


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Aug 12 2008, 01:23 AM
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Yes you're right mate, playing straight major scale over IV will sound minor because it is similar to tonic's dorian with the exception of 3rd which is major. Blues is magic smile.gif


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Vinni Smith
post Aug 12 2008, 06:31 AM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Aug 12 2008, 01:23 AM) *
Yes you're right mate, playing straight major scale over IV will sound minor because it is similar to tonic's dorian with the exception of 3rd which is major. Blues is magic smile.gif


I am completely lost when you guys start talking dorian and froididan and loydian.... ; ^ )
Seriously though, I understand that I should know that stuff but I don't. I just play by the seat of my pants most of the time.

Now when you say a major scale over the IV is like a dorian, did I make it clear that I would be playing a G major scale over a D IV chord? So, I guess I would be playing the IV of the IV.

I am not questioning you in any way. I am just trying to make sure we are on the same page so I can understand what you mean. Like I say, I am dense when it comes to figuring out what I am playing and why it sounds good.

After we get thru hashing this stupid idea of mine out, I can tell you guys about the half-whole double diminished scale that I learned from Robben Ford if you are interested. Makes for some great out of the pocket nonsense for the I and the IV chord.

Vinni

QUOTE (Guitar1969 @ Aug 11 2008, 08:12 PM) *
Its official now - Vinni is one us GMCers whos going to be addicted to the GMC Forum. Actually this is a a nice simplistic tip. I've never been one to switch scales over the specific chord in the progression, but know its important but this is a simple idea to start doing so.

Thanks again


Same with me. I have never liked moving my scales from chord to chord. To me it sounds like the song is getting broken up. Like it starts and stops. It, is, like, putting, too, many, comas, in, a, sentence. It does not flow or sound very musical to me. This little trick however does sound very musical. Just my opinion of course.

I have a buddy that is a guitar playing fool. I mean this guy can play like no one you have heard. However, he does some things with moving the scales with the chords that just creeps me out! He will play some blues that will blow your socks off and then when the band hits the IV chord and he will fly strait into that IV chord scale and just ruin everything! I hate that! Singers dont do that. They take a melody and work the song and chords around the melody, not the other way around. I think we should play like that as well. I think if you can hear too much of the movement, then it sounds too planned or figured out. You will never hear a famous guitar solo on the radio do that. All the solos that have lasted thru the years treat a guitar melody just like a voice does. I could name 10 off the top of my head.

I have a dear friend in New York named Chuck D'Aloia. He teaches me stuff over the phone now and then. One day he told me, I will teach you anything you want to know, but, the most important step of them all is this....After you learn them, forget them and just play like this. He then played a nice little statement over the I chord. Then played a very similar statement over the IV chord and I then began to understand. We must not forget it is music.

OK, I will shut up now and get off my soapbox. I will go on and on sometimes about this nonsense.

Vinni


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Starry Manhattan...
post Aug 12 2008, 07:54 AM
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Thanks for the advice Vinni! Also, awesome to see you here at GMC and I can't wait to be using your V Picks! I'm the guy from Australia lol!


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post Aug 12 2008, 10:17 AM
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Hi vinnie, and welcome to GMC.. smile.gif
I recieved my v-picks last week (really fast delivery.. excellent) and are really enjoying them so far. Kudos to you.. biggrin.gif

Really interesting tip you have there.. I'll check it out as soon as possible (after i learned the major scale.. haha) wink.gif

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blindwillie
post Aug 12 2008, 10:18 AM
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A Robben Ford clinic!?!?!
*mumbles*


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Vinni Smith
post Aug 16 2008, 04:49 AM
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QUOTE (blindwillie @ Aug 12 2008, 10:18 AM) *
A Robben Ford clinic!?!?!
*mumbles*


Does that mean you like Robben or hate Robben?

I sure learned a lot of things by going to his clinic.

But that bugger won't even try my picks! He tole me, "I am an old dog".

Vinni


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Rooks
post Aug 16 2008, 04:58 PM
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Then that Robben guy got the saying wrong .. It's "You can't teach an old dog new tricks" not "An old dog can't use new picks" ^^


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