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> Playing Hawaiian Style On A Steel 6 String Acoustic
Guitar1969
post Aug 14 2008, 07:43 PM
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Being the family guitarist, I have been asked to play a Hawaiian style song as an accompanyment to a singer(My Son) at a party next week. The song is Over the Rainbow/What a wonderful life which was rearranged and performed by Israel Kamakawiwo'ole - Here's a Youtube video of it if anyone is interested

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mr-alr7P_qk

So my question is, I don't have a Ukulale nor do I play Hawaiian style(but I could do a mean rock version), but was wondering if there is a way I can pull off something similar with my six string acoustic - I know that Hawaiian music uses Slack-key guitar tunings, and thinking with the use of a capo I might be able to get something close to the sound.

Also don't know about the most common hawaiian strumming techniques.

I did find a six string guitar Tab of the song in C but it doesn't really sound like the original.

If a slack key could be used, making it simple maybe I have a chance before D-day.


If there are any GMCers out there that know a bit about the subject of Hawaiian style, I would appreciate some info - might also be a good intro lesson topic since GMC has no current info on hawaiian style guitar.

Thanks in advance


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Matt23
post Aug 14 2008, 08:08 PM
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Quite a lot of hawiian stuff uses a lap steel guitar so maybe you should try a slide.
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Niko Fran
post Aug 14 2008, 08:24 PM
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Try the one in C with a capo on 12 fret if possible, that should give a real "uke" sound.. Or youcould buy a uke for nearly no money, song is easy to play smile.gif
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Guitar1969
post Aug 14 2008, 09:54 PM
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QUOTE (Niko Fran @ Aug 14 2008, 12:24 PM) *
Try the one in C with a capo on 12 fret if possible, that should give a real "uke" sound.. Or youcould buy a uke for nearly no money, song is easy to play smile.gif


I thought about getting a Uke, but I know nothing about playing one and I am stressed that I won't have enough time to learn. Is there a simple Hawaiian strum - I spent some time surfing the net for Hawaiian guitar styles and doesn't seem to be much out there, except stuff to buy a book on it

The slide style seems interesting(Don't know much about it) - Last time I tried slide it sounded horrible, but my guitar wasn't set up for it(Need higher action) - I may try this again

Anybody know the basic Uke strum pattern that can be adapted to a regular guitar - I must have to tune differently since the Uke has a different tuning.


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RIP Dime
post Aug 15 2008, 05:09 AM
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Braddah IZ!! laugh.gif Never thought I'd see a thread about him here, but that is a beautiful song, and a great party song.

The strumming pattern and chords sound rather straightforward, I think you could figure out the chords and stuff on your own. I think you should probably use high voiced chords if you want to get as close to the uke sound as you can. You could use open tunings but that might be more difficult if you're not used to them. For the strumming pattern, I'd suggest you just use your hand or fingers for strumming, a pick would probably be too aggressive sounding. But it sounds like a basic reggae strumming pattern to me.

Even if you aren't used to figuring out things by ear, this is probably a good song to try it on for the first time. I think the strumming pattern is the same throughout the song, and the chords move in simple enough directions.

I don't think you need to change your tuning, because I think the chords are rather universal(C Em etc..), but try learning the song by ear in standard tuning and let us know what happens.


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Déjà vu
post Aug 15 2008, 05:43 AM
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Thought I'd pop in and say "I LOVE THIS SONG!!" biggrin.gif
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Guitar1969
post Aug 15 2008, 06:43 AM
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Actually the more I've researched this song, the more I've learned that it isn't an easy strumming pattern, even for hawaiian musicians, but the pattern came natural for Iz. But I can get an okay sound with a standard reggae strum.

The closest I can get is playing it with a standard tuning, and capoing the 5th fret, playing it in G (Which ends up sounding like the original Key of C on the uke).

I may still try to do it on slide and see how that sounds, but I am waiting for a Slide Extension Nut that I ordered that easily raises the action on my guitar for sliding.

thanks,


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