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> Writing What's In My Head, How to get those pesky notes on paper and fretboard
Rain
post Aug 16 2008, 04:43 AM
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So I've been with you guys for a few months now and playing guitar for eight (woo over 1/2 year mark) and am really starting to move in the right direction. I'm to the point where I'm really discovering the kind of music I like - two examples of which I provide below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wBmIp1-CVY&NR=1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIjUswdbGtQ

The main problem I'm running into is that I can have something very simple in my head - not quick at all but when I try to find it on the fretboard - it takes forever AND I typically end up forgetting the thing by the time I find the starting note. In addition, I have listened to several guitarists who use licks and when I try to copy the lick, I can't - the sound is always wrong. I'm looking to create my own music but it's just not happening and thus dampening my ability to express my ideas.

Is there any way to train myself to get those notes right a bit faster? Also, when I have an idea in my head about a song, what is the best means by which to get those notes working - at least a bit faster.

Thanks for reading / listening smile.gif


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RIP Dime
post Aug 16 2008, 06:29 AM
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I hear you, this also my main struggle as a musician. What I do to practice getting ideas out is to figure out some of my favorite songs by my favorite artists by ear.

But the big difference between figuring out something in your head, and something off a CD is that the idea in your head can be forgotten, so a thing you can do is buy a cheap little voice recorder, keep it on you all the time, and hum a riff into your recorder as soon as it comes in your head. Then sit down with it later and try to figure it out.

But as far as figuring things out by ear, perfect practice makes perfect. I'm not really sure how to properly practice figuring things out by ear, but I'm sure the instructors here can help you out.


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kjutte
post Aug 16 2008, 02:21 PM
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QUOTE (Rain @ Aug 16 2008, 05:43 AM) *
So I've been with you guys for a few months now and playing guitar for eight (woo over 1/2 year mark) and am really starting to move in the right direction. I'm to the point where I'm really discovering the kind of music I like - two examples of which I provide below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wBmIp1-CVY&NR=1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIjUswdbGtQ

The main problem I'm running into is that I can have something very simple in my head - not quick at all but when I try to find it on the fretboard - it takes forever AND I typically end up forgetting the thing by the time I find the starting note. In addition, I have listened to several guitarists who use licks and when I try to copy the lick, I can't - the sound is always wrong. I'm looking to create my own music but it's just not happening and thus dampening my ability to express my ideas.

Is there any way to train myself to get those notes right a bit faster? Also, when I have an idea in my head about a song, what is the best means by which to get those notes working - at least a bit faster.

Thanks for reading / listening smile.gif


Singing helps aural skill ALOT.
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Ivan Milenkovic
post Aug 16 2008, 03:50 PM
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Hey man,

I think you shouldn't worry too much mate. You got to the point in your playing career where you understand what makes a true musician and a player - to be able to play exactly what's on your mind. And trust me - it is great that you have found out so soon.

But the truth is - if all of us could use shortcuts for achieving that goal we would all be superb musician by now. Because this thing makes real players, and it is achieveable only through hard work and long year study of music. We all wanna reach the goal of playing exactly what is on our mind (and soul), and we all work pretty hard to do it. It is this hard work (and a lifetime of it) what makes it rewarding in the end if we achieve it.

So don't worry and keep practicing. IMHO you're too young to worry about those things, and if many seems not at your grasp at the moment, some of these skills will come to you sooner then you think if you continue to work hard, be persistent, and love the music. Just keep rocking mate! smile.gif

This post has been edited by Ivan Milenkovic: Aug 16 2008, 03:51 PM


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seagull
post Aug 16 2008, 04:23 PM
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You should really try to listen to Ivan, that answer RULED! Really should be helpful for you! smile.gif
To contribute with something of my own, I'll tell you that Rome wasn't built in a day! This is no way of trying to demoralize you, because as Ivan said you're lucky (or ahead of your musicianship) to have figured out precisely what you want to accomplish, and THAT is a huge leap you've taken from being just a beginner to actually becoming a musician. Motivation is the keyword, and as long as you have a carrot dangling on a stick in front of you, you will always strive to reach out and grab it even though you just can reach. Thats drive, and you should be glad to feel that drive and motivation!

It's not the goal - it's the journey...smile.gif

This post has been edited by seagull: Aug 16 2008, 04:26 PM
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wylde_guitar
post Aug 16 2008, 04:42 PM
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something I do, you might find strange is that after learning so many licks and songs from my favorite bands on guitar, and remembering where the notes are, if I think of something, I take the first note and think of where I've heard that pitch before in a song I've played. For example say I hear the note that is the 9th fret on D, and I'll realize that is the first note in the opening solo in Fade to Black (I hope that makes sense, it's hard to explain). And you can do that with any note in any song you've ever learned. Amazingly, this works very well for me, but it may not work for you.
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seagull
post Aug 16 2008, 05:45 PM
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QUOTE (wylde_guitar @ Aug 16 2008, 05:42 PM) *
something I do, you might find strange is that after learning so many licks and songs from my favorite bands on guitar, and remembering where the notes are, if I think of something, I take the first note and think of where I've heard that pitch before in a song I've played. For example say I hear the note that is the 9th fret on D, and I'll realize that is the first note in the opening solo in Fade to Black (I hope that makes sense, it's hard to explain). And you can do that with any note in any song you've ever learned. Amazingly, this works very well for me, but it may not work for you.



I do the same thing. It is a very effective way to recognize scales, intervals, chords and all sorts of other things. Often when I hear a chord which sounds like a 7th chord, I think of other songs I know have seventh chords in them and try to figure it out. An when I want to identify an interval, I sing it and play random notes on the fretboard (either multiple strings or single) and from that I can figure out the interval. Then I try to put it into context by finding songs I'll always remember, in which the melodie at some point matches that interval.
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JVM
post Aug 16 2008, 06:02 PM
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Agreed, when I first began ear training intervals I associated them with different songs I knew... like a third I would play out 'iron man' in my head, a fourth I think was 'we wish you a merry christmas', for a perfect fifth I used the main theme of opeth's 'Silhouette', or at least what I would like to call the main theme (the part at 2:32). Of course, thats just for ascending intervals, but its a fun way to start.


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Rain
post Aug 17 2008, 01:56 AM
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Wow, I'm in shock and awe! Such friendly comments from everyone! Ivan, it's interesting that you should post in this thread because the style I'm going for is very similar to one of your lessons in particular, the Gary Moore lesson!

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/solo-guit...advanced-level/

(as a side note, if any of you know very very similar lessons to this particular one, I would really appreciate it! I love the style) Ivan - I'll do a little bit more searching around in your section to see if I can't find more videos for inspiration.

As for the "Rome not built in a day" and "it just takes time" - I'm glad that you guys have given me a solid answer. From guitar alone I realized that some things really DO just come in time and after specific milestones of study (no matter what field of study some times!). So, I will continue to push forward.

One thing I did notice one of my friends do, in a class actually, was writing music using the actual music notations (the bars and staves and notes etc etc) - should I try to learn that so I can pull ideas out of my head a little bit more...intuitively, or should I keep going with writing my ideas out in TABs?

Also, is it "right" and "okay" to copy someone elses "popularized" or "well-known" licks? And (if not, which I think is the asnwer), how do I go about manipulating the given lick to produce a more personal sound that resembles the popular, well accepted lick? Do I need to know the Theory behind the lick and then explore possible note selections from there? Or is there a more simplistic way? Unfortunately I'm just starting on Andrew Cockburn's Music theory lessons so I'm really new with the topic and won't have a real foundation in Theory for awhile.

So many questions - so many more to come, I'm sure!

Edit: Thought of another question: When making my own Licks - is it best to know the Theory beforehand so I don't "violate any rules"? Or is it okay just to go with what I think sounds right and leave it at that? I know you could technically do it the latter way but is it "preferred" amongst the professionals to have specific theory knowledge of the imagined lick?

This post has been edited by Rain: Aug 17 2008, 02:04 AM


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Galneryus [SYU / YUUTO-LEDA] - the GazettE - Sonic Syndicate - Versailles - Sadie - Takayoshi Ohmura - Steve Vai - MintJam - Sex Machineguns - Gentaro Satomura - CYCLE - Paul Gilbert - X Japan - Disturbed
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seagull
post Aug 17 2008, 04:10 AM
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QUOTE (Rain @ Aug 17 2008, 02:56 AM) *
Wow, I'm in shock and awe! Such friendly comments from everyone! Ivan, it's interesting that you should post in this thread because the style I'm going for is very similar to one of your lessons in particular, the Gary Moore lesson!

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/solo-guit...advanced-level/

(as a side note, if any of you know very very similar lessons to this particular one, I would really appreciate it! I love the style) Ivan - I'll do a little bit more searching around in your section to see if I can't find more videos for inspiration.

As for the "Rome not built in a day" and "it just takes time" - I'm glad that you guys have given me a solid answer. From guitar alone I realized that some things really DO just come in time and after specific milestones of study (no matter what field of study some times!). So, I will continue to push forward.

One thing I did notice one of my friends do, in a class actually, was writing music using the actual music notations (the bars and staves and notes etc etc) - should I try to learn that so I can pull ideas out of my head a little bit more...intuitively, or should I keep going with writing my ideas out in TABs?

Also, is it "right" and "okay" to copy someone elses "popularized" or "well-known" licks? And (if not, which I think is the asnwer), how do I go about manipulating the given lick to produce a more personal sound that resembles the popular, well accepted lick? Do I need to know the Theory behind the lick and then explore possible note selections from there? Or is there a more simplistic way? Unfortunately I'm just starting on Andrew Cockburn's Music theory lessons so I'm really new with the topic and won't have a real foundation in Theory for awhile.

So many questions - so many more to come, I'm sure!

Edit: Thought of another question: When making my own Licks - is it best to know the Theory beforehand so I don't "violate any rules"? Or is it okay just to go with what I think sounds right and leave it at that? I know you could technically do it the latter way but is it "preferred" amongst the professionals to have specific theory knowledge of the imagined lick?



Two answers before I hit the sack. tongue.gif

Regarding your question about writing your music down...You asked if you should go for either Tab or Sheet Music, and I would say both! Knowing Sheet Music provides you an almost unlimited access to both rock music and classical compositions. Everything which is written in sheet music can be adapted to every instrument imaginable, and I think that it is a great advance to be able to read it! Sure, it is somewhat easier to write in tab, and as for us simple guitarists it is also easier to learn from laugh.gif But in the end, I think that if you study both, you will be prepared for a lot more than if you just study one of them intensely!

And your question about licks....YES! Of course it is both ALLOWED and RECOMMENDED that you use/interpret other musicians licks and try to incorporate them in your playing in a fashion which you find suitable for your attitude.
Countless of guitarists, and other musicians as well, have learned from their inspirations, and theres nothing wrong with paying your due to your heritage by adapting a lick to your sound and ideals. Just rock on and don't directly rip-off the musical ideas and contexts behind the lick/songs, make it happen your own personal way! smile.gif

Enjoy yourself, thats what matters!

Good riddance. smile.gif
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Ivan Milenkovic
post Aug 17 2008, 03:45 PM
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Thanks man, I appreciate your kind words. I'm glad because I can help in any way.

Regarding licks, it is perfectly natural to copy others licks and implement them in your own playing. This is how all musicians start to learn - from better musicians. Then along the way you will compose your own licks, and fuse those well known licks in your playing, and build your own new style. All the guitar greats did just this. It is not necessary to know the theory behind the licks right away, just learn the theory separately, and in time all the licks will make perfect sense to you.

When you do compose your own licks, just play what sounds right and don't worry about it. You don't need to know theory to compose new licks of course. As I mentioned above, you can learn theory concepts in parallel to other things so you understand better what you are playing.

Cheers mate smile.gif



QUOTE (Rain @ Aug 17 2008, 02:56 AM) *
Wow, I'm in shock and awe! Such friendly comments from everyone! Ivan, it's interesting that you should post in this thread because the style I'm going for is very similar to one of your lessons in particular, the Gary Moore lesson!

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/solo-guit...advanced-level/

(as a side note, if any of you know very very similar lessons to this particular one, I would really appreciate it! I love the style) Ivan - I'll do a little bit more searching around in your section to see if I can't find more videos for inspiration.

As for the "Rome not built in a day" and "it just takes time" - I'm glad that you guys have given me a solid answer. From guitar alone I realized that some things really DO just come in time and after specific milestones of study (no matter what field of study some times!). So, I will continue to push forward.

One thing I did notice one of my friends do, in a class actually, was writing music using the actual music notations (the bars and staves and notes etc etc) - should I try to learn that so I can pull ideas out of my head a little bit more...intuitively, or should I keep going with writing my ideas out in TABs?

Also, is it "right" and "okay" to copy someone elses "popularized" or "well-known" licks? And (if not, which I think is the asnwer), how do I go about manipulating the given lick to produce a more personal sound that resembles the popular, well accepted lick? Do I need to know the Theory behind the lick and then explore possible note selections from there? Or is there a more simplistic way? Unfortunately I'm just starting on Andrew Cockburn's Music theory lessons so I'm really new with the topic and won't have a real foundation in Theory for awhile.

So many questions - so many more to come, I'm sure!

Edit: Thought of another question: When making my own Licks - is it best to know the Theory beforehand so I don't "violate any rules"? Or is it okay just to go with what I think sounds right and leave it at that? I know you could technically do it the latter way but is it "preferred" amongst the professionals to have specific theory knowledge of the imagined lick?



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- Check out my GMC Profile and Lessons
- (Please subscribe to my) YouTube Official Channel
- Let's be connected through ! Facebook! :)
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