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> Tuning Down...., ????
Toroso
post Sep 1 2008, 01:55 AM
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OK, I don't know...

When tuning down, should I continue to play scales at the same position? Or adjust accordingly???

I know it souds stupid, but hey! blink.gif What can I say? No lies here. laugh.gif


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Ctodd
post Sep 1 2008, 02:01 AM
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Yeah, I could see how this could be confusing...

If the tab, or whatever it is your are reading, tells you to tune down a half step (or whatever it may be) you still play the tab as shown, in other words, forget that you tuned it down and play the tab as you normally would.

So if you play a G major scale in normal tuning, then tune down a half step, and play the same positions, it becomes the Gb/F# major scale.

Hope this helped!

-Chris

This post has been edited by Ctodd: Sep 1 2008, 02:02 AM


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Gus
post Sep 1 2008, 06:02 PM
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When you tune differently you will still have the same scales.

It makes more difference on the shapes that have open strings. For instance, Guns n roses in normal tuning is sometimes hard to play (when open strings are used).
Let's say you want to solo over "don't cry". In normal tuning you are going to use Abm shape, and in a guitar tuned half tone below you are going to use Am shape, which most people learn first and therefore finds easier.

So, the place at the guitar where you practice depends on the songs (and keys) you want to play... wink.gif

In tabs you will usually find the naming convention relative to tuning. So, the don't cry example will start in Am chord, there will be indication of 1/2 tone below and will be tabbed accordingly. A piano player would be confused, because the sound is actually from a Abm chord...

This post has been edited by Gus: Sep 1 2008, 06:04 PM


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 2 2008, 02:54 AM
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When you tune down, notes change on the fretboard, and if for example you use standard D tuning, this means that E note is now on the 2nd fret of highest and lowest string.

So yes, you should adjust your playing accordingly. Try to see different tunings as an easier way to play a song, not the harder way. Experimenting with tuning can produce some interesting results.


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Toroso
post Sep 2 2008, 03:02 AM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Sep 1 2008, 09:54 PM) *
When you tune down, notes change on the fretboard, and if for example you use standard D tuning, this means that E note is now on the 2nd fret of highest and lowest string.

So yes, you should adjust your playing accordingly. Try to see different tunings as an easier way to play a song, not the harder way. Experimenting with tuning can produce some interesting results.


That's the whole thing Ivan. I know the notes change, what I didn't was why it is done. So you can continue playing scales at the same position for a diff sound. Or if you would shift the scales and still have a somewhat different sound. I think I got it now tho bud. Ooops, my battery is dying.... mad.gif


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kjutte
post Sep 2 2008, 05:30 PM
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QUOTE (Toroso @ Sep 2 2008, 04:02 AM) *
That's the whole thing Ivan. I know the notes change, what I didn't was why it is done. So you can continue playing scales at the same position for a diff sound. Or if you would shift the scales and still have a somewhat different sound. I think I got it now tho bud. Ooops, my battery is dying.... mad.gif


A scale has a certain interval of notes, which means that you can NOT play the same patterns as before.
You have to change to accordingly to your new tuning.

That said, EADGBE FTW.
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Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 2 2008, 05:58 PM
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If the notes change, then you change the layout of the patterns on the fretboard. Dropped tunings, or open tunings gives you a more darker sound for example, but still you need to press the right notes in order to sound right.


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