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> Pentatonic Scale
KyleM
post Sep 2 2008, 03:45 AM
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Since I've joined which was a couple days ago, I've been just trying to memorize the Pentatonic Minor scale. I have been for upwards of about 3-4 hours a day (sometimes more if i can get out of work early biggrin.gif ).

My question is, when I'm trying to improvize off of a simple backtrack, does it really matter what pattern i play so long as i play a pattern of the Minor Pentatonic scale. For example. If i was in the Key of A and slid up to the key of C i could keep the same pattern. Then slide back down from C to the key of A using a different pattern?

This is all new to me, so i might not be saying everything in great detail. Thx.

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Toroso
post Sep 2 2008, 04:07 AM
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QUOTE (KyleM @ Sep 1 2008, 10:45 PM) *
Since I've joined which was a couple days ago, I've been just trying to memorize the Pentatonic Minor scale. I have been for upwards of about 3-4 hours a day (sometimes more if i can get out of work early biggrin.gif ).

My question is, when I'm trying to improvize off of a simple backtrack, does it really matter what pattern i play so long as i play a pattern of the Minor Pentatonic scale. For example. If i was in the Key of A and slid up to the key of C i could keep the same pattern. Then slide back down from C to the key of A using a different pattern?

This is all new to me, so i might not be saying everything in great detail. Thx.


There are five patterns or boxes to the pentatonic scale. Pattern or box 1 determines the key. So if you are playing Am pent, pattern one is at the fifth fret, A. All other patterns are played in relation to that. If you slide up to C at the 7th, fret, pattern 1 is played and the other patterns relative to that postition. If you want to stay in Am, pattern 2 would be played at the 7th fret. Hope that answers your question.

This post has been edited by Toroso: Sep 2 2008, 04:08 AM


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KyleM
post Sep 2 2008, 04:25 AM
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QUOTE (Toroso @ Sep 1 2008, 10:07 PM) *
There are five patterns or boxes to the pentatonic scale. Pattern or box 1 determines the key. So if you are playing Am pent, pattern one is at the fifth fret, A. All other patterns are played in relation to that. If you slide up to C at the 7th, fret, pattern 1 is played and the other patterns relative to that postition. If you want to stay in Am, pattern 2 would be played at the 7th fret. Hope that answers your question.


That's answers pretty much all of it, but one thing. That means for each key you want to start in, your pattern will change depending on the key you started in. So instead of starting in Am and proceeded to start in the Key of C. The pattern changes because the root notes are now all C instead of Am?
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superize
post Sep 2 2008, 08:38 AM
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QUOTE (KyleM @ Sep 2 2008, 05:25 AM) *
That's answers pretty much all of it, but one thing. That means for each key you want to start in, your pattern will change depending on the key you started in. So instead of starting in Am and proceeded to start in the Key of C. The pattern changes because the root notes are now all C instead of Am?


If you would play in C minor you start on the C with the first penta box. The same goeas with everything else. If it is stillunclear you can go to www.all-guitar-chords.com ther you can see all scales


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 2 2008, 04:52 PM
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If you change the key where Am is VI (Cmajor key) to Cm where C is VI (Eb key) , just move the patterns one and a half step to the right. This should transfer you to C minor pentatonic.


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Danilo Capezzuto
post Sep 3 2008, 10:14 AM
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I agree with Ivan.
But if you means From Am to C...well you have to play the same pentatonic. Just look at the new root who won't be the A note, but the C note!


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 3 2008, 07:21 PM
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QUOTE (Danilo Capezzuto @ Sep 3 2008, 11:14 AM) *
I agree with Ivan.
But if you means From Am to C...well you have to play the same pentatonic. Just look at the new root who won't be the A note, but the C note!


Spot on, if going from Am-C, then Am pentatonic has the same notes as Cmajor pentatonic.

PS there is one more option, Am-C is appearing in G major key as well as II-IV, so Em pentatonic can be used for creating a different mood.


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JCJXXL
post Sep 5 2008, 04:07 AM
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Hmmm... now I'M confused. KyleM I hope you don't mind me hoping in on this thread. It's a good question and hopefully I'm not hijacking the thread. But I think my questions tie into Kyle's.


How do you decide which pattern to play?

And to be in the key of say C couldn't I keep playing pattern #1 but slide up to fret 8 and start there?

And couldn't you play the first pattern and intertwine it with one of the other patterns? In other words, why couldn't you stay in one area on the fret board and play pattern 1 but occassionally drop a note or two in from another one of the patterns while still playing in the same area?

This post has been edited by JCJXXL: Sep 5 2008, 04:08 AM
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kjutte
post Sep 5 2008, 09:30 PM
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QUOTE (JCJXXL @ Sep 5 2008, 05:07 AM) *
Hmmm... now I'M confused. KyleM I hope you don't mind me hoping in on this thread. It's a good question and hopefully I'm not hijacking the thread. But I think my questions tie into Kyle's.


How do you decide which pattern to play?

And to be in the key of say C couldn't I keep playing pattern #1 but slide up to fret 8 and start there?

And couldn't you play the first pattern and intertwine it with one of the other patterns? In other words, why couldn't you stay in one area on the fret board and play pattern 1 but occassionally drop a note or two in from another one of the patterns while still playing in the same area?


If you look closely, the patterns aren't played in the same position.

I is always followed by II, etc.
You never use just one pattern, you just choose which one to start with.

If a song's in Em, then you'll play Em pentatonic (The first pattern), and if you have E as I, then II will be G, and III will be A, etc.
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buttmonk
post Sep 6 2008, 06:59 AM
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QUOTE (JCJXXL @ Sep 5 2008, 06:07 AM) *
And couldn't you play the first pattern and intertwine it with one of the other patterns? In other words, why couldn't you stay in one area on the fret board and play pattern 1 but occassionally drop a note or two in from another one of the patterns while still playing in the same area?


(lets say we are playing in Am)

If u do this u are of course no longer playing strictly in minor pentatonic scale. Those extra notes u drop in based on other minor pentatonic box shapes may or may not sound good, and if they do sound good, it will not be becoz u took them from some other minor pentatonic shape, just that you are lucky they happen to be from some other Am scale shape for the current position. Most likely, any notes that sound good when dropped in will be those coming from another Am scale pattern in the current position so u will be kind of playing say: Am pentanic minor pattern 1 but occasionally switching to say Am some other scale, some pattern, whilst all the time staying in same fretboard position. That is fine and can be more interesting that just sticking with 1 scale when done well.

Of course there will be some times that you do want to change the key you are playing in so in that case you may want to swap the 1 pentanoic minor pattern for another and still play in exactly the same position.

I am no expert, just repeating what I *think* I have learned so far from GMC:) Someone else might want to confirm whether or not I am talking out me arse:)

This post has been edited by buttmonk: Sep 6 2008, 07:06 AM


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