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> Scales To Use In Progressions
Vesterkave
post Sep 9 2008, 03:15 PM
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Hi.

Is there a program which can come up with scales to use when typing in a progression ? Ex a A/Dm/F... Little newbie in finding the right scales other than pentatone ect...
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Matt23
post Sep 9 2008, 03:20 PM
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Dunno bout a program but for that you should use aeolian (natural minor) or phrygian. I think the A should be an Am because if it isn't then ive no idea really what scale. You should read andrews theory lessons to know how to work this out.
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Cuchulain
post Sep 9 2008, 03:20 PM
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QUOTE (Vesterkave @ Sep 9 2008, 03:15 PM) *
Hi.

Is there a program which can come up with scales to use when typing in a progression ? Ex a A/Dm/F... Little newbie in finding the right scales other than pentatone ect...

This does just that.


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kjutte
post Sep 9 2008, 07:01 PM
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QUOTE (Vesterkave @ Sep 9 2008, 04:15 PM) *
Hi.

Is there a program which can come up with scales to use when typing in a progression ? Ex a A/Dm/F... Little newbie in finding the right scales other than pentatone ect...


well that's not really a valid chord progression.

Anyway, the majorsclae has 7 chords.
These chords represent 7 modes.

The majorscale goes like this, in C Ionian (natural major)
C D E F G A B C

So, you see, the scale has 7 notes, and thus 7 degrees, and 7 modes.
Eeach degree has its own chord, obviously.

The progression is:
Cmaj Dmin Emin Fmaj Gmaj Amin Bdim

Let's say you want to play in minor instead of major.

Change your progression to, let's say

Amin Dmin Amin Emin.
This will give you a nice progression in A aeolian.

Hope this helped, feel free to ask further question.

And, theory is the answer to your questions, start studying! biggrin.gif



This post has been edited by kjutte: Sep 9 2008, 07:16 PM
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Andrew Cockburn
post Sep 10 2008, 12:58 PM
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QUOTE (kjutte @ Sep 9 2008, 02:01 PM) *
well that's not really a valid chord progression.


You're right Kjutte but with one slight modification - that isn't a valid Major Scale progression ... however, any progression is "Valid", its just a question of how complex it is to describe it in theory terms.

The progression you gave, as Kjutte points out, doesn't fit into the chords for the major scale (if you changed the A to an A minor it would), but you can still use that progression, it means you will be changing key at various points whereas you wouldn't need to if you stuck with the progression that Kjutte mentioned.

For any given chord progression you won't neccesarily be able to find a normal scale that fits it all, you may need to change the scale at various different points.

At the end of it all, what matters is what sounds good!


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Ian Bushell
post Sep 10 2008, 03:52 PM
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QUOTE (Andrew Cockburn @ Sep 10 2008, 01:58 PM) *
You're right Kjutte but with one slight modification - that isn't a valid Major Scale progression ... however, any progression is "Valid", its just a question of how complex it is to describe it in theory terms.

The progression you gave, as Kjutte points out, doesn't fit into the chords for the major scale (if you changed the A to an A minor it would), but you can still use that progression, it means you will be changing key at various points whereas you wouldn't need to if you stuck with the progression that Kjutte mentioned.

For any given chord progression you won't neccesarily be able to find a normal scale that fits it all, you may need to change the scale at various different points.

At the end of it all, what matters is what sounds good!


Great post Andrew!!
I think any chord progression is valid. Sometimes you may come up with a riff that just sounds cool but theoretically is not correct or
doesn't fit in a key. Problem then is figuring out what is going on, i find myself in that situation often;P
Generally it just turns out to be key changes.

Just out of interest what would the chord scale be for a chromatic scale?
Can you harmonise the chromatic scale that way?

This post has been edited by Ian Bushell: Sep 10 2008, 04:00 PM


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kjutte
post Sep 10 2008, 05:09 PM
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QUOTE (Andrew Cockburn @ Sep 10 2008, 01:58 PM) *
You're right Kjutte but with one slight modification - that isn't a valid Major Scale progression ... however, any progression is "Valid", its just a question of how complex it is to describe it in theory terms.

The progression you gave, as Kjutte points out, doesn't fit into the chords for the major scale (if you changed the A to an A minor it would), but you can still use that progression, it means you will be changing key at various points whereas you wouldn't need to if you stuck with the progression that Kjutte mentioned.

For any given chord progression you won't neccesarily be able to find a normal scale that fits it all, you may need to change the scale at various different points.

At the end of it all, what matters is what sounds good!


I didn't mention modulationg because I thought he would be confused smile.gif
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Andrew Cockburn
post Sep 11 2008, 12:47 AM
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QUOTE (Ian Bushell @ Sep 10 2008, 10:52 AM) *
Just out of interest what would the chord scale be for a chromatic scale?
Can you harmonise the chromatic scale that way?


A very interesting question, but ultimately I think the answer is not too interesting ...

You can take this a couple of ways - first answer is "absolutely any chord" - with a choice of any note though we have no guidance in terms of major and minor chords that give chord progressions their flavour. Choice is a double edged sword, too much and you don't know what to do - more restriction and you are forced to be creative with what you have.

The second answer would be to try and use standard chord construction techniques - stacking 3rds on top of each other ... but you end up with some nasty dissonant chords that way - CDE for instance - these are 3rds in terms of the scale, although not in inteval terms that we are used to. That kind of approach is based on diatonic scales in any case and it just breaks down when you go chromatic, so I prefer the first answer!


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jacmoe
post Sep 11 2008, 04:26 PM
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If you want to fool around and learn chord progressions (and modes) interactively, I recommend that you take a peek at Guitar Alchemist.

It's a great program when you want to learn the modes and the chords to go with them. wink.gif

You can lock it down to a key/mode, and then you can browse the chords.

Take it for a spin.
Apparently it haven't been updated for a while, but that doesn't matter much. smile.gif


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