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Nazgul
post Sep 10 2008, 06:31 PM
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Hi there!

I've got a question about learning scales: I've asked it before but would like to know the opinion of Andrew. smile.gif

How well should one learn the particular scale before going to another one? For example, I recently learned the Minor/Major Pentatonic and Blues Scale (not in all keys though), and would like to start learning the Major and Minor Scale, to have more possiblities in songwriting. Now, I'm still no genius in shredding in the Minor Pentatonic, and would like to know if I first should try to master this scale perfectly before learning the other ones or first learning all important scales and then improving my knowledge in all of them, bit by bit.

Thanks, of course an answer from everyone is appreciated! smile.gif


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Andrew Cockburn
post Sep 11 2008, 12:57 AM
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Ther are 2 separate parts to learning a scale (at least) - an intellectual and ear related understanding vs muscle memory to play it. You can know what a scale sounds like and be able to write songs using it without even being able to play it.

Muscle memory is what takes the hours and hours of practice - you can understand the sound of the scale more quickly.

So, the question becomes what is most important? Writing songs, or playing songs?


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Nazgul
post Sep 11 2008, 12:33 PM
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QUOTE (Andrew Cockburn @ Sep 11 2008, 01:57 AM) *
So, the question becomes what is most important? Writing songs, or playing songs?


Writing songs. biggrin.gif


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Andrew Cockburn
post Sep 11 2008, 08:14 PM
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QUOTE (Nazgul @ Sep 11 2008, 07:33 AM) *
Writing songs. biggrin.gif


OK, well in that case, you need to play the scales enough to understand their sound and feeling and to be able to get musical ideas down, but you don;t need to spend years getting them up to shredding speed wink.gif

I'd do both though - concentrate on practicing one or two scales thoroughly to a metronome, but spend time at least playing slowly through a few others. Its a different type of practice really - the first is technique and mechanics, the second is discovery - both are important!


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Nazgul
post Sep 12 2008, 11:41 AM
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Thank you very much, Andrew! biggrin.gif

I'll take your advice. smile.gif


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kjutte
post Sep 15 2008, 01:27 PM
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QUOTE (Nazgul @ Sep 10 2008, 07:31 PM) *
Hi there!

I've got a question about learning scales: I've asked it before but would like to know the opinion of Andrew. smile.gif

How well should one learn the particular scale before going to another one? For example, I recently learned the Minor/Major Pentatonic and Blues Scale (not in all keys though), and would like to start learning the Major and Minor Scale, to have more possiblities in songwriting. Now, I'm still no genius in shredding in the Minor Pentatonic, and would like to know if I first should try to master this scale perfectly before learning the other ones or first learning all important scales and then improving my knowledge in all of them, bit by bit.

Thanks, of course an answer from everyone is appreciated! smile.gif


And some happy facts.

If you learn the majorscale, you will automatically know most scales.
Minor is the same scale, just played with different rootnotes (don't worry about this yet, just take my word for it)

Pentatonic is the majorscale without the 2nd and 6th note, harmonic minor has a sharpened note and melodic minor has two sharpened notes.
So you see, if you know the majorscale, you can easily adapt yourself to any scale.

Most other scales are symmetrical like diminished, or wholetone, so these are easily learned.
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Nazgul
post Sep 20 2008, 08:18 PM
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QUOTE (kjutte @ Sep 15 2008, 02:27 PM) *
And some happy facts.

If you learn the majorscale, you will automatically know most scales.
Minor is the same scale, just played with different rootnotes (don't worry about this yet, just take my word for it)

Pentatonic is the majorscale without the 2nd and 6th note, harmonic minor has a sharpened note and melodic minor has two sharpened notes.
So you see, if you know the majorscale, you can easily adapt yourself to any scale.

Most other scales are symmetrical like diminished, or wholetone, so these are easily learned.


Thank you for these happy facts. wink.gif And I knew that the Minor Scale is the Major Scale just with a different root tongue.gif , I'm not a noob at theory. laugh.gif

But I didn't knew about the other scales like Harmonic Minor etc... so, Thanks! smile.gif

This post has been edited by Nazgul: Sep 20 2008, 08:18 PM


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kjutte
post Sep 26 2008, 05:38 PM
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QUOTE (Nazgul @ Sep 20 2008, 09:18 PM) *
Thank you for these happy facts. wink.gif And I knew that the Minor Scale is the Major Scale just with a different root tongue.gif , I'm not a noob at theory. laugh.gif

But I didn't knew about the other scales like Harmonic Minor etc... so, Thanks! smile.gif


biggrin.gif glad to enlighten!
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