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> Chords, What do they mean?
CompleteNewbie
post Sep 11 2008, 07:54 PM
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Help, huh.gif

Can someone explain what the chords mean please. I am currently working my way sslllooowwwlllyyyyy through the beginners lessons (smoke on the water) and Power Chords for beginners. They seem straight forward enough to learn, and I am enjoying it, but what do they mean?

What is for example G5, Bb5, C5 and C#5 on smoke in the water, or power chords for beginners A5, E5, B5 and G5

Thanks in anticipation.

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sigma7
post Sep 11 2008, 08:08 PM
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Well, the C5 means just the root and the perfect 5th. the perfect 5th is 3 and 1/2 steps from the root which is G. so it would be C and G. Another example is G5,. U take G, and count up 3 and 1/2 tones, and you get D. So G5 is G and D.
I dont have the skill to explain it but the formula is 1 and 5(the root and the Perfect 5th).

u will notice on smoke on the water, that u fret three different strings. But the way the chord is laid out, u will only get 2 notes. The root, and 3 1/2 steps up

This post has been edited by sigma7: Sep 11 2008, 09:06 PM


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Toroso
post Sep 11 2008, 08:38 PM
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RETRACT: I didn't fully read your post before answering. huh.gif

This post has been edited by Toroso: Sep 11 2008, 08:41 PM


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 11 2008, 09:04 PM
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Chord is a name for simultaneous sound of (at least) three notes is a scale. Excuse me for a poor sentence construction, english is my second language smile.gif

Chord is built out of notes from a scale. For example you have a scale:

C D E F G A B - C major scale

and wanna make C major chord,

take C note, then third interval of C (which is E), than fifth interval of C (which is G)

so chord C major has three basic notes C E G.


So you may ask now why major? well it is because of the nature of that third interval. Third interval (the second note in a chord) is the note that determines whetter it is a minor or major chord, depending if third is minor or major third;

minor third has one and a half step distance from root
major third has 2 whole steps distance from root

for some more theory about chords check out Andrews theory lessons, chords are nicely explained there.


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Kapto
post Sep 11 2008, 09:05 PM
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Less confussing (I think)
G5 Count (G 1st A 2nd B3rd C4th D5th) there's your power chord made of 2 notes.
C5 Count (C 1st D 2nd E 3rd F 4th G 5th ) Made of the X note + its 5th.
What would be the notes of D5? wink.gif
Hope it helps


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CompleteNewbie
post Sep 11 2008, 09:32 PM
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Thanks for your replys.

I think this one is going to take me a while..... huh.gif


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sigma7
post Sep 11 2008, 09:33 PM
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ya it took me a year before it all started to click. As a beginner, just get famailiar with the guitar and see how it works and when you feel comfortable, i would start diving deep in theory.

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Andrew Cockburn
post Sep 12 2008, 02:59 AM
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QUOTE (sigma7 @ Sep 11 2008, 04:33 PM) *
ya it took me a year before it all started to click. As a beginner, just get famailiar with the guitar and see how it works and when you feel comfortable, i would start diving deep in theory.


Good advice - theory will be there when you are ready for it - for now, just remember the names of the chords as you learn them, and understanding will come later, its not essential for learning but it is interesting for later on!

A simple answer to your question is that we name chords in 2 parts - first we use a note to identify each chord, that is the 1st note in the chord usually (we call it the root note). The after the note, there will be numbers and symbols that describe the type of chord. Major and Minor are a couple of types, "5" means it is a power chord which is a simple type of chord with just 2 notes in it.


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kjutte
post Sep 12 2008, 10:16 AM
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QUOTE (CompleteNewbie @ Sep 11 2008, 08:54 PM) *
Help, huh.gif

Can someone explain what the chords mean please. I am currently working my way sslllooowwwlllyyyyy through the beginners lessons (smoke on the water) and Power Chords for beginners. They seem straight forward enough to learn, and I am enjoying it, but what do they mean?

What is for example G5, Bb5, C5 and C#5 on smoke in the water, or power chords for beginners A5, E5, B5 and G5

Thanks in anticipation.

Eric


G5 means that you have the G and the perfect fifth. The build of a powerchord is Rootnote+fifth. therefore, A5, etc.
Bb5 means the fret between A and B as the chordroot. you can also say A#, depening on which chordprogression it is.

Anyway.
An A5, is just an A+E note plucked together.
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CompleteNewbie
post Sep 12 2008, 12:24 PM
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Thanks again guys......

Thanks for trying to explain..... huh.gif

Andrew, Sigma 7, I'll take your advice and try and get Smoke on the Water and Kristofers power chords lesson to sound like they should first laugh.gif

Thanks again all.

Eric


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jer
post Sep 12 2008, 02:35 PM
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I wouldnt get into the theory behind chords yet.

But I WOULD write down the names of all the chords you come across and write down what notes are in each one.

Start building a library of chords. As you come across a new one, add it to the library.

I would also print yourself some of these to write the chord diagrams on.


http://toddwashere.tripod.com/chord/shtchd_6str_36.pdf
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CompleteNewbie
post Sep 12 2008, 02:50 PM
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That's Great.

Thanks for that.


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jer
post Sep 12 2008, 02:58 PM
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QUOTE (CompleteNewbie @ Sep 12 2008, 08:50 AM) *
That's Great.

Thanks for that.

If you need any help filling it out be sure to ask.

No dumb questions.

Everybody starts at the bottom.

When you have it under your belt, just return the favor to the next beginner.

You may notice that a chords technical definition is 3 notes played all at once. The chords you are playing in smoke on the water are only 2 notes. They are called "diads". Fancy name for TWO NOTES PLAYED AT ONCE.

Folks will still call them chords. And thats fine. Just making sure you know so you dont get confused.

Are you reading Andrews theory course????


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Jesse
post Sep 12 2008, 03:08 PM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Sep 11 2008, 10:04 PM) *
Chord is a name for simultaneous sound of (at least) three notes is a scale. Excuse me for a poor sentence construction, english is my second language smile.gif

Chord is built out of notes from a scale. For example you have a scale:

C D E F G A B - C major scale

and wanna make C major chord,

take C note, then third interval of C (which is E), than fifth interval of C (which is G)

so chord C major has three basic notes C E G.


So you may ask now why major? well it is because of the nature of that third interval. Third interval (the second note in a chord) is the note that determines whetter it is a minor or major chord, depending if third is minor or major third;

minor third has one and a half step distance from root
major third has 2 whole steps distance from root

for some more theory about chords check out Andrews theory lessons, chords are nicely explained there.
Equals 3or more notes played together:D I think your english is pretty good! It's not my native language as well.


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sigma7
post Sep 12 2008, 07:26 PM
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QUOTE (jer @ Sep 12 2008, 08:58 AM) *
If you need any help filling it out be sure to ask.

No dumb questions.

Everybody starts at the bottom.

When you have it under your belt, just return the favor to the next beginner.

You may notice that a chords technical definition is 3 notes played all at once. The chords you are playing in smoke on the water are only 2 notes. They are called "diads". Fancy name for TWO NOTES PLAYED AT ONCE.

Folks will still call them chords. And thats fine. Just making sure you know so you dont get confused.

Are you reading Andrews theory course????



o man i forggot all about diads. haha


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kjutte
post Sep 14 2008, 10:31 AM
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QUOTE (jer @ Sep 12 2008, 03:35 PM) *
I wouldnt get into the theory behind chords yet.

But I WOULD write down the names of all the chords you come across and write down what notes are in each one.

Start building a library of chords. As you come across a new one, add it to the library.

I would also print yourself some of these to write the chord diagrams on.


http://toddwashere.tripod.com/chord/shtchd_6str_36.pdf


the sooner you see the patterns behind the scales and the chords, the less confused you'll ultimately be.
I do not agree to this at all.

Also, a pro to this is that you'll instantly be able to jam all over the guitarneck.
Priceless.

This post has been edited by kjutte: Sep 14 2008, 10:48 AM
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Raw
post Sep 14 2008, 01:55 PM
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And always remember: Everbody starts at zero both in knowledge and technique in guitarplaying, but as you're progressing you will begin to see the pattern, because in musical theory about everything make sense. As you progress I think you will have many "I get it-moments", and often when you learn one rule you discover how much you can apply them to any kind of song.

For about 3 years ago I started playing guitar and had no idea of anything concerning chords. Now Im playing in a deathmetal band, but Im aluitarist so the gin a jazzband consisting of about 20 people (guitar, bass, drums, saxophone, trumpet, trombone) and that has been a really brilliant training for both complicated jazz chords and sightreading. My point isent to brag but to illustrate that if you work a little day by day with 10 minutes of theorylearning per day, and you also try to apply what you've learned in every possible situation, it shouldnt take you more then 6 six month to learn the basic properly . You should start by learning notes as all music theory and all written music often has to do with it. Good luck!
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Nemanja Filipovi...
post Sep 14 2008, 03:31 PM
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Every thing you hear is placed in some chord structure(music that is).Chord structure can be classified by a number of distinct pitch classes(degree of the scale).

Triads-three pitch classes-C E G(C Major) or C Eb G(C minor)...Ivan sad well what makes the chord minor or major.

Tetrads-four pitch classes-C E G B( Major Seventh)also known as maj7;M7 or C E G Bb(minor seventh) m7;-7

You should start with triads(major and minor) and go on with that.


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CompleteNewbie
post Sep 14 2008, 05:37 PM
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Thanks Guys.

Just keep practacing is the order of the day.......

This post has been edited by CompleteNewbie: Sep 14 2008, 05:38 PM


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