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> E.q. Pedals And Settings
Ajmurrell
post Sep 30 2008, 01:35 AM
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Hello there gear fanatics smile.gif

I was wondering what people's general thoughts about applying E.Q. to their live or recorded sound is? Is it a "don't leave home with out it!!" kind of thing that you simply wouldn't dare over look when recording or playing live?

I guess im interested in learning how to use E.Q. settings properly, wether its a pedal or during post production when editing with music software.

If anyone has any tips on how you use E.Q's you use for different styles/sounds that would be very interesting reading. Also if anyone know's of any detailed sites that provide a bit of theory behind it all so I can learn what does what to your sound that would be great smile.gif



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Emir Hot
post Sep 30 2008, 04:59 AM
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I always EQ everything when mixing. There are rules how to make correct frequencies of each instrument but all depends on the arrangement you are working on. It has to do a lot with physics. Bass frequency shouldn't get into the guitar frequency etc... Proper EQing will make your general picture clearer. When you touch middle, treble or bass on your amp, you actually applied EQ. Now again you have to EQ everything in your mix to make each instrument fit nicely into your song. For example I almost always apply more high and a bit of middle frequencies on vocal because my microphone doesn't give me enough of those frequencies. That makes my vocal stand out more in the mix. Almost the same I do for guitar. If you record everything with good equipment (good mic, pre-amp etc...) there shouldn't be much need for extreme EQ. And again when everything is mixed you need a general EQ for mastering.

Proper using of EQ is a whole science in sound engeneering so I just wanted to make an introduction. It would be nice to here more comments how pepople using different techniques.

Cool topic by the way.


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Nemanja Filipovi...
post Sep 30 2008, 07:12 AM
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Emir sad it well,it all has to do with what kind of equipment you haw.For example,the cheaper equipment,more work you haw in the mix.That is why good microphones cost 3000 $ and good preamps the same.All this is meant to pick up the sound as original as it can.
I always bust up 4.5 db on 8khz when it comes to vocals,some times I cut the bottom,but it all depends.For example,Sound Garden(Chris Cornell)has nothing below 100 Hz.When it comes to drums,the best way is to listen and work.Besides eq for drums,compression is important.You haw to learn the control the instruments,but not to over kill the sound.That comes with experience.Once again the best practice is to listen and work.


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Marcus Siepen
post Sep 30 2008, 10:39 AM
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As Emir already pointed out, as soon as you twist some of the knobs on your amp you are using an EQ, so yes, we all use them wink.gif But I definitely don't like to add more eqs to my live sound. I like to keep my setup small and simple, I prefer a rather pure signal, my guitar plugged straight into the amp, no additional EQs (Of course I am using some effects too, chorus, reverb, delay, to get certain sounds, but thats not really an eq). If the amp doesn't sound like this, well, think about getting a better amp wink.gif But seriously, the less you need to get a good sound, the better. Of course, when you record a whole band, you will need some eqs in the final mix to make everything work, but if you have to tweak your sond completely to get a somehow good tone out of your equipment you should really think about getting some new gear.


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Andrew Cockburn
post Sep 30 2008, 01:04 PM
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Yes!

You should be used to using EQ in the mix as Emir says - if you aren't using EQ then you need to learn more about it - it is an essential tool in putting together a cohesive mix - the other to tools that are just as important in pulling it all together are compression and delay/reverb - but EQ comes first. Its all about carving out a sonic space for each sound so that they coexist rather than getting on top of each other.

Then, as a separate exercise, you can tweak the overall EQ of your mix in the master, or as a post-production activity to make it sound more like other tyracks on your CD (this is one of the many important tasks that a mastering engineer will do). Even if you are just putting an MP3 up on GMC you should consider tweaking the overall tone if you think it needs it, although in isolation your mix will often be ok.


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 30 2008, 04:35 PM
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As Emir said, EQ is a whole science, and there are no perfect settings suitable for all. Why?

here are some of the reasons:

- there is various gear on the market and everything colors the sound differently
- humans perceive audio differently, so it is a highly subjective matter, even with the SAME setup
- each player has it's own individual characteristic sound that stands out even on the same settings and gear
- EQing becomes trickier when a lot of instumentalist are involved. For example it is a lot harder to do a mix job of a whole jazz or symphonic orchestra than a 4 man rock band.
- acoustics of the room play important role in the mixing process, and so is studio monitoring

Typically if we talk about some general EQing, it is worth noting that some EQ settings got into mainstream by their increased use and became famous, like scooped mids with modern metal production, or hi mids with classic rock and metal production. Also in modern metal production kick drum should be more spotty, sharp and low-middy, while as we go into the past, you will see that kick was more muddy, low end, and thumpy. This is just a simple example how EQing of the spectrum changed as music styles changed over the years and, again, even these example is subject to relativity

When playing live with a standard rock setup, drum, bass, 2 guitars, vocal, first you EQ the rhythm section, specially kick and bass according to your style and liking. Then rhythm guitar should have a big low end and be bit lower in mids than a lead one to cut through during solos, vocals, and snare are adjusted in mids as well, and highs are left for presence controlling, transients and cymbals. As a general practice you can take a multitrack project and sweep the range of EQ's in order to experiment and see what you can come up with.

Also I'll note what Marcus nicely stated, and that is that the gear plays important role. The simpler the setup - the better it will sound. I agree with that, because with every EQing you are actually damaging the sound, so ti is best to make the sound to your liking with the smallest amount of gear possible. If you can't do that, than somethings wrong with the gear. Even when you do need to apply EQ, you do it in very small step increments. On high end monitors, every change in EQ, like 0.5 or 1dB shoudl be heard clearly so you know what you are doing. If you cannot hear those changes, then speakers lack precision, and you need better monitors. The same goes for EQ devices. If you can't hear results after minor changes, EQ is bad, and you need a more transparent and precise one.

So lot of things involved in this process, and the golden rule is - do everything in small step increments, until you find a perfect balance. Only high end transparent gear allows big step increments while preserving the sound.

This post has been edited by Ivan Milenkovic: Sep 30 2008, 04:38 PM


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Ajmurrell
post Sep 30 2008, 07:56 PM
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Thanks guys smile.gif Great information going on here, and certainly sounds like a very complex topic that is also very subjective.

It also sounds as if I really should upgrade my gear (and come on, it's always great to have an excuse to upgrade some stuff biggrin.gif) as I currently have a fairly high end guitar and a very low end amp!! Another issue for me is I have relatively poor hearing and always have, it's not terrible, but for example in loud environments I struggle to pick individual voices out when talking to people. So mixing is always challenging, and frustrating, so I useally get my mate to do it who is studying Music tech at uni at the moment.

I always knew that my amp would need upgrading, simply because it isn't very good, but decided to upgrade the guitar first. And when the guitar cost me £1200, I've got a lot of saving to do before I can get the next item on the list.

Currently I've been house bound for a good few years due to an annoyingly complicated anxiety disorder, so I really owe it to myself to get some new equipment. smile.gif

Thanks again guys,


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 30 2008, 10:50 PM
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I also have trouble hearing in loud environments. If you get some new gear, post some pictures or ask some questions, we'll try to help mate. CHeers smile.gif

Also if you need help with some mix, send audio so we can give you some advices how to improve it.


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