Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Solos and riffs
BM
post Nov 2 2006, 12:46 AM
Post #1


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 67
Joined: 9-October 06
From: Dover Delaware
Member No.: 871



Kris,
I am writing a song right now, and I got the intro, but I can't get a riff or a solo in because my teacher won't show me how! IT IS REALLY FRUSTRATING! I have a really good song but I can't get a good riff to accompany the words and I don't know how to write a solo!

PLease Help!

And if anyone has any suggestions please tell me!

Connor


--------------------
"Baptized in a firefight. Hot blood running cold as ice. 44 minutes of target practice. All hell's breaking loose.
Outgunned. Watching the force come to a firefight with a pocket knife.
Getting schooled until they shot Achilles' heel and brought down the beast."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Kristofer Dahl
post Nov 2 2006, 10:38 AM
Post #2


GMC Founder & Rocker
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.179
Joined: 15-August 05
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Member No.: 2



And you are asking me... I suck at that too! sad.gif

Anyone else has a suggestion? blink.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
RIP Dime
post Nov 2 2006, 11:13 AM
Post #3


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.063
Joined: 2-October 06
From: Hawaii
Member No.: 862



A good place to start when writing a guitar part for a song is finding out what you want to do with the guitar part.
Do you want it to set a mood?
You could make a happy mood with major key riffs, or something sad, or dark sounding with minor keys, flat 5th for evilness etc...
Do you want you guitar part to have a strong melody?
Creating melodies is difficult, a good place to start is think of a melody and try to play it.
Or do you want just a simple chord progression?
Just pick a few chords that you think sound good after one another. ex- Emaj Dmaj Amaj

There are no rules when writing music, so just do what you think would make the song sound good.

Hope this helps

This post has been edited by RIP Dime: Nov 2 2006, 11:14 AM


--------------------
IPB Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cheep
post Nov 2 2006, 11:35 AM
Post #4


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 14
Joined: 9-October 06
Member No.: 870



Well, I think everyone has his personal approach of creating a song.. Some do it more with "feeling", or building a melody on a specific chord, etc, etc..

Perhaps this video will help you : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEBbK2sgXqc

Dave Weiner explains his way of creating songs, or just a quite "easy" way to do it..

Hope it'll help you,

Flo
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
PickNGrin
post Nov 2 2006, 04:14 PM
Post #5


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 195
Joined: 10-October 06
Member No.: 873



Many songs develope over time, sometimes years..songwriters often start by jotting down, or recording "ideas" They often have many ideas and songs in different stages of development at the same time.
Can you tell us more detail of where you are, what chords, lyrics? what key? got a clip recorded yet?

PS -LOVE the user name btw BM -PERFECT! biggrin.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Josiah
post Nov 2 2006, 05:07 PM
Post #6


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 60
Joined: 22-October 06
From: USA
Member No.: 887



Everyone wants to write a great song the first time out, or second, or third... But its a trap that will sap your time and energy because although you might be inspired, you really don't have the skills to do it yet. Those skills come from writing A LOT of songs, and an ongoing study of songwriting and theory.

Best advice I ever heard for songwriting is "Write for the trash can." Write for fun and out of inspiration. Dont worry if it is incomplete or dosent sound that great, just write another!

This is great advice especially if you are starting out. If you worry too much about each work and end up writing only five songs a year, chances are you won't have the skills or experience that the guy who wrote one hundred songs in that time will have.

Let me ask you something, could you write three songs in an day? Of course you can! They will suck (maybe!), but you will benefit more from it than by noodling around trying to find that "perfect" chorus part you've been searching all week for! Heck, that "perfect chorus part" might even magically appear in one of those three songs!

I have also found that if you keep ALL your material, you sometimes create a chorus or verse that fits perfectly with something you wrote long ago. And with a new perspective and skills, you can really put a polish on that "old stuff"!

So my advice would be to make it your goal to be a prolific writer, and study songwriting in ernest. You'll soon be writing "keepers"!

Good Luck be with you,
Josiah


--------------------
Good Luck be with you,
Josiah
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tank
post Nov 2 2006, 09:37 PM
Post #7


GMC Veteran
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 667
Joined: 20-August 05
From: Shropshire UK
Member No.: 5



Another aproach is to look at the rhythm of the words you've used. Speak them out loud, and clap the rhythm. Then try to use this rhythm to develop the riff from. When the song is finished, the listener will eventually notice that the lyrics are linked to the riff, and it'll sound like you meant it.

/T
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Kristofer Dahl
post Nov 3 2006, 02:09 PM
Post #8


GMC Founder & Rocker
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.179
Joined: 15-August 05
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Member No.: 2



Josiah couldn't agree more - I often find myself trying to get a perfect song out of an idea I have - and eventually the idea turns into nothing. The best stuff is usually the spontaneous ideas.

Tank, a very interesting approach - and when I think about it, shoud be pretty logic. We all oughta study RAP! blink.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
RIP Dime
post Nov 4 2006, 05:40 AM
Post #9


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.063
Joined: 2-October 06
From: Hawaii
Member No.: 862



QUOTE (Josiah @ Nov 2 2006, 05:07 PM) *
Everyone wants to write a great song the first time out, or second, or third... But its a trap that will sap your time and energy because although you might be inspired, you really don't have the skills to do it yet. Those skills come from writing A LOT of songs, and an ongoing study of songwriting and theory.

Best advice I ever heard for songwriting is "Write for the trash can." Write for fun and out of inspiration. Dont worry if it is incomplete or dosent sound that great, just write another!

This is great advice especially if you are starting out. If you worry too much about each work and end up writing only five songs a year, chances are you won't have the skills or experience that the guy who wrote one hundred songs in that time will have.

Let me ask you something, could you write three songs in an day? Of course you can! They will suck (maybe!), but you will benefit more from it than by noodling around trying to find that "perfect" chorus part you've been searching all week for! Heck, that "perfect chorus part" might even magically appear in one of those three songs!

I have also found that if you keep ALL your material, you sometimes create a chorus or verse that fits perfectly with something you wrote long ago. And with a new perspective and skills, you can really put a polish on that "old stuff"!

So my advice would be to make it your goal to be a prolific writer, and study songwriting in ernest. You'll soon be writing "keepers"!

Good Luck be with you,
Josiah


That makes total sense, great advice.


--------------------
IPB Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 23rd May 2017 - 01:50 PM