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> Harmony, Important
Tolek
post Nov 4 2008, 04:02 PM
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Hey there instructors,
some of you surely learned harmony at school. I am doing it now. Next Monday, I'm going to have an important exam. If don't pass it, I'll have to leave music section or go a class backwards. :-S So, could you please help me? I just wrote some cadences and I am not sure if they're correct.
Could somebody check the 3 examples: Quartvorhalt in G-Dur, Quartvorhalt in D-Dur and Quartvorhalt in A-Dur? please

Thank you. smile.gif

Tolek

This post has been edited by Tolek: Nov 4 2008, 04:04 PM
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Tolek
post Nov 4 2008, 07:08 PM
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Nobody? :'(


EDIT: By the way, this is my 500th post! biggrin.gif

This post has been edited by Tolek: Nov 4 2008, 07:26 PM
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Pedja Simovic
post Nov 8 2008, 10:09 PM
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Tolek congratulations on your 500th post !

I am looking at this and it looks right
I am getting confused by the german language but I am guessing this all has to be major scale cadences correct?


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Ramiro Delforte
post Nov 8 2008, 10:47 PM
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In the first ex. (the Cm) you have a plagal cadence (IV-I) I don't know if that's the supposed thing to do. If that's the exercise is ok but check the bar where the I degree stands three times. You have a seventh that "jumps" to the fifth of the V chord. It's forbbiden in classical harmony that kind of movement usually you have to resolve it.

In the second ex. (the C major) in the second measure when you go to a IV degree you have a direct octave between the tenor and the bass (both voices moves to the same note in the same direction) you can solve that moving the bass to the lower F.
When you go from the II degree to the V you have two parallel fifths (could be done if they let you because one of the fifths is diminished). -Between the alto and the soprano-.

I think the rest is ok.

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Pizzoaro
post Nov 8 2008, 10:51 PM
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Dur is the same as major, and moll is the same as minor, just to clear that up...


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Tolek
post Nov 8 2008, 11:37 PM
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QUOTE (Pedja Simovic @ Nov 8 2008, 10:09 PM) *
Tolek congratulations on your 500th post !

I am looking at this and it looks right
I am getting confused by the german language but I am guessing this all has to be major scale cadences correct?

You are right. These are major cadences. Sorry that I forgot to mention this. I have to intergrate a fourth in the V of the second mesure. That´s the exercice.
Thank you.

QUOTE (Ramiro Delforte @ Nov 8 2008, 10:47 PM) *
In the first ex. (the Cm) you have a plagal cadence (IV-I) I don't know if that's the supposed thing to do. If that's the exercise is ok but check the bar where the I degree stands three times. You have a seventh that "jumps" to the fifth of the V chord. It's forbbiden in classical harmony that kind of movement usually you have to resolve it.

In the second ex. (the C major) in the second measure when you go to a IV degree you have a direct octave between the tenor and the bass (both voices moves to the same note in the same direction) you can solve that moving the bass to the lower F.
When you go from the II degree to the V you have two parallel fifths (could be done if they let you because one of the fifths is diminished). -Between the alto and the soprano-.

I think the rest is ok.

biggrin.gif


Thanks for this long reply. smile.gif The first exercice is a correction of another one which isn´t on this page. I don´t know what I´ve written there. ohmy.gif That´s horrible... a seventh in the I... We didn´t learn that yet. I have copied badly from the blackboard. dry.gif
The second exercice: I don´t see parallel octaves. huh.gif The notes in the VI are (from Sopran to Bass): C E C G and in the IV: C A F F. So, no parallel octaves, or? We did that examle in class with the teacher, so it shouldn´t be wrong. I asked to check the other examples, those that you didn´t critisize. biggrin.gif I thank you, however. smile.gif

QUOTE (Pizzoaro @ Nov 8 2008, 10:51 PM) *
Dur is the same as major, and moll is the same as minor, just to clear that up...

Thank you for mentioning this.






Please check the last three exercices. (G Major, D Major and A Major)
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Ramiro Delforte
post Nov 9 2008, 10:15 PM
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Parallel octaves are different from direct octaves (maybe you didn't learn the rule as for the conduction of the seventh)
Parallel means that two voices "jump" (both move not diatonically) into the same note and with the same motion.

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Tolek
post Nov 15 2008, 02:29 PM
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QUOTE (Ramiro Delforte @ Nov 9 2008, 10:15 PM) *
Parallel octaves are different from direct octaves (maybe you didn't learn the rule as for the conduction of the seventh)
Parallel means that two voices "jump" (both move not diatonically) into the same note and with the same motion.

biggrin.gif

Sorry, I didn't see your response.
Oh yes, I see it now. Thanks. smile.gif
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