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> Lesson Request, Rodrigo y Gabriela
wylde_guitar
post Nov 14 2008, 12:57 AM
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I'm sure many of you have already heard of these amazing guitarists, particularly Rodrigo and I really want to learn how to play some upbeat spanish acoustic music but its pretty tricky to self teach

If you haven't heard them here is their live cover of Stairway to Heaven AMAZING!! laugh.gif
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNc5o9TU0t0

I would be so grateful if someone would make more lessons in this kind of style, thanks and rock on! cool.gif

by the way, can anyone also recommend some powerful spanish sounding scales, chords, or techniques that work well together? just so i have something to work on in the mean time smile.gif
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Bogdan Radovic
post Nov 14 2008, 01:06 AM
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Great request!

Have you seen Sergio's Lessons : https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/instructor/Sergio-Dorado
They are full of cool flamenco techniques.. smile.gif


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wylde_guitar
post Nov 14 2008, 01:36 AM
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ya i saw those im gonna look at the chords but what i mainly want is the kind of soloing techniques they use (because i know i would get mass ladies cool.gif haha) but in honestly im just in love with the incredible sound that guitarists like rodrigo create
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OrganisedConfusi...
post Nov 14 2008, 01:41 AM
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I've seen them live and they were incredible.


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BMcG
post Nov 14 2008, 03:44 PM
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Try playing around with the Phrygian Dominant scale (sometimes called "Spanish Phrygian" or "Phrygian Major 3rd"). It's basically the phrygian mode with a major third. So the E Phrygian Dominant scale (based on the E phyrgian mode from the key of C Major) would have the notes:

E F G# A B C D

You might notice that this is a permutation of the notes of A harmonic minor. This is because E Phrygian Dominant is the fifth mode of A harmonic minor.

Hope that helps.
_Bryan

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fatb0t
post Nov 14 2008, 03:55 PM
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BMcG I've read a few places that you use the Phygian Dominate over a minor progression and it creates a spanish feel. Is this true? I believe the conflicting 3rds create a really cool tension, never tried it myself though...

This post has been edited by fatb0t: Nov 14 2008, 03:55 PM
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BMcG
post Nov 14 2008, 04:25 PM
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Well, it's interesting...you can play any note over any chord if you resolve it "correctly". You'll hear people say this all the time and it's totally true, but it takes some skill to pull it off.

Having said that, I would not say that playing E Phrygian Dominant over an E minor chord is the "ideal" use of the mode. Our ears tend to find a major third in the melody over a minor chord as dissonant, or "wrong". The opposite, however, is true of a minor third in the melody over a major family chord. This is due largely to our ears being used to the sound of the blues and rock 'n' roll.

The stereotypical chord progression for Spanish sounding music (and I don't mean to simplify Spanish music to this at all, but just to make a point) is major triads moving up and down a half step. So play your typical open E major chord and then play the barre F major chord a half step above that. Move those back and forth one bar each, and you'll know the sound that I'm talking about.

Try improvising over that progression with the E Phrygian Dominant mode and you should get something very "Spanish" sounding.

_Bryan
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