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AdamB
post Nov 28 2008, 09:38 AM
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Hi David,

In your 'Clean Up Your Act With Good Finger Placement' lesson, just wondering with your first finger on your left hand, are you flattening the finger out at the first joint? Or should this always remain bent?

Should every single string that isn't being played be muted somehow, or should I concentrate on just muting the strings either side of the one I'm playing?

Also, is there any good exercises to work on this specifically, I was thinking of running through a scale like a 3nps ionian and playing first the note I'm fretting, then the notes on the string above and below to make sure they're muted and then move to the next note in the scale, do you think that is a good idea?

Thanks!
-Adam
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David Wallimann
post Dec 22 2008, 03:40 PM
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Hi Adam, thanks for this great question!

The rule kind of changes from player to player. Many elements are to be considered (guitar you use, sound you use, your finger lenghth, etc...)

Basically the rule iss that you should eliminate any unnecessary noises by any means.
For the most part, I usually concentrate on the strings next to the note I am playing.
It will be a very active process at first, but will soon become second nature and eventually you won't have to think about it.

When it comes to my index finger, I usually keep it pretty flat to mute most strings... But that rule is not set into stone. You can adapt it to your own needs.

I hope this helps!




QUOTE (AdamB @ Nov 28 2008, 03:38 AM) *
Hi David,

In your 'Clean Up Your Act With Good Finger Placement' lesson, just wondering with your first finger on your left hand, are you flattening the finger out at the first joint? Or should this always remain bent?

Should every single string that isn't being played be muted somehow, or should I concentrate on just muting the strings either side of the one I'm playing?

Also, is there any good exercises to work on this specifically, I was thinking of running through a scale like a 3nps ionian and playing first the note I'm fretting, then the notes on the string above and below to make sure they're muted and then move to the next note in the scale, do you think that is a good idea?

Thanks!
-Adam



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