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> Barre Chords, Switching Chords
JCJXXL
post Nov 30 2008, 05:05 AM
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Playing barre chords isn't a problem. The problem is switching from a standard chord to a barre chord. It's not fast enough for me. Anyone have any suggestions? I know time and practice will solve it but what about technique?

How do most of you change from a standard chord to a barre? Middle finger first followed by ring and pinky then finally barre? Or ring, pinky, middle and then finally the barre?

Just looking for tips to improve technique/speed when switching.

Thanks!
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Vinod Saranga
post Nov 30 2008, 05:13 AM
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There is no hard rule for which finger you switch first.It's very subjective.


Actually there is no significant difference in difficuly bitween switching from normal chord to normal chord and normal chord to barr.

Hold a chord which you think that you are not fluent when switching.Then strum it for 10 times slowly.

release your fingers then hold it again and strum it.Repeat this few times.This will help you to improve your muscle memory and will speed up your switching bitween chords.  smile.gif



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Ramiro Delforte
post Nov 30 2008, 05:42 AM
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I give to my particular students a very simple exercise that's very similar to what Vinod said.
Imagine that you want to change from F to C (or viceversa). You put the metronome on in a veeeery slow tempo, lets say quarter = 30 and you make the chord change at that tempo and go increase the pulse when you think you are ready. In that way you'll notices the increment of speed to change from one chord to the other.


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Darfuria
post Nov 30 2008, 12:29 PM
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Well logically it'd be best to change the chord so that the finger closest to the low e is in position first, but that doesn't really happen.

All in all it just comes with time and you don't really notice it.

If you begin practicing your standard chords with barre chord fingers (using fingers 2, 3 and 4 instead of 1, 2 and 3) for E, Em, A and Am shapes, you'll find it'll get a lot easier.


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Nov 30 2008, 01:37 PM
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You can use various techniques, depending where you are on the fretboard. If you do from chord A > barre chord B or vice versa, try to play the change as slowly as you can, so your brain can focus on all fingers at once. If don't do it ultra slow, you can't really practice properly the change, because you can focus on 1-2 fingers max. If you do it ultra slow you can focus on all fingers, and know exactly what every one of them has to do. This way when you go up to speed, your brain will remember those exact movements (providing that you did go up the tempo gradually and always following the same movements of course).


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JCJXXL
post Dec 1 2008, 02:42 AM
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Thank you to everyone for the suggestions. I'll keep going at it and use all the advice given. Thanks again!
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Gus
post Dec 1 2008, 09:14 AM
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Hey, another thing that no one mentioned yet is that if the chord is no the same shape type (in CAGED system) it may worth to change the fingering of the open chord.

Example: Suppose you normally use fingers index,middle,ring to make a open A. If the sequence of the chord is A and then a Bm it worths to use fingers middle,ring,pinky for A chord. Then when moving to second fret you only have to slide your things and add the bar with index finger. wink.gif
This is even more visible when going the other way around: from barre chord to open chord.

This post has been edited by Gus: Dec 1 2008, 09:21 AM


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JCJXXL
post Dec 2 2008, 12:03 AM
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Gus, I am embarrassed I didn't think of that. Duh. Thanks! In fact, that's the chord change I am working on! Thanks!
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Pedja Simovic
post Dec 2 2008, 12:10 AM
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I have found that practicing this with metronome and trying to visualize the chord changes helps a lot.
I have taught beginners how to play Tears in Heaven with this visualization technique. They nailed it every time. In the beginning you start slow pick a very slow tempo (click) and try to change chord every 4 clicks . Pick just two chords at the time for example. You can apply same principle to 2 bars or beats etc. The way this works is first couple of times (5 to 10) you play while looking at your left hand - as you know this is the toughest part when changing chords assuming strumming stays the same. When you have done this, now you do the same thing but without looking at your left hand but rather looking at your right hand or closing your eyes !
Unlocks your playing 100%.
Proven method .
Try it out you will be amazed how it works.



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Ivan Milenkovic
post Dec 2 2008, 12:15 AM
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Also in general with changing chord shapes, you always wanna keep the fingers on the string if those fingers are just shifting horizontally (on one string). Just slide the finger onto new position. It is much easier then to raise it and fret it again.


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