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> Perfect Pitch, Does it work?
RIP Dime
post Nov 29 2006, 05:16 AM
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http://www.perfectpitch.com/

Saw an ad in GuitarWorld for this magic lesson thingy-ma-bob that will train your ear to pick out notes and chords on the fly, definately a usefull technique, but does it work?
Anyone try this?
Opinions?


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Kristofer Dahl
post Nov 29 2006, 08:19 AM
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QUOTE (RIP Dime @ Nov 29 2006, 07:16 AM) *
http://www.perfectpitch.com/

Saw an ad in GuitarWorld for this magic lesson thingy-ma-bob that will train your ear to pick out notes and chords on the fly, definately a usefull technique, but does it work?
Anyone try this?
Opinions?


Well I can't tell for sure but I can tell you this:

To my knowledge that ad has been in guitar magazines since 1970-80, at the time it was sold on casette tapes.

If a course wants to teach you perfect pitch from a casette recorder you know there is something wrong - because different casette recorders give different pitches! biggrin.gif

I'm sure you will get something out of the course. However, absolute pitch isn't nearly as good as relative pitch.

Relative pitch is about recognising the intervals (see harmonizing lesson) - so you at any time when improvising/composing can transpose the melodies of your head to the guitar. That's what I want to learn - I don't want to sit all day and picture F# as yellow ( I believe perfect pitches courses teaches you to associate colors with notes).

My two cents...

--Kris


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RIP Dime
post Nov 29 2006, 08:28 AM
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Yeah I thought about that too, but the thing comes with a section on relative pitch, and it says you don't have to think of pitches as colors, but think of notes like colors, with it's own characteristics.
But I don't know, it's a 135$ lesson, and feels kinda fishy, but I also can't help but think that it works if it's been around for that long.... dry.gif


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Tank
post Nov 29 2006, 11:26 AM
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QUOTE (RIP Dime @ Nov 29 2006, 09:28 AM) *
Yeah I thought about that too, but the thing comes with a section on relative pitch, and it says you don't have to think of pitches as colors, but think of notes like colors, with it's own characteristics.
But I don't know, it's a 135$ lesson, and feels kinda fishy, but I also can't help but think that it works if it's been around for that long.... dry.gif


I think it can be trained through hard work. From a physics point of view its just developing the sensitivity to recognise a frequency. That's why the colour (uk spelling) analogy is most used, as all you're doing with colours is seeing the frequency of light, and identifying it. I've noticed this more recently as my daughter is now 2 years old, and is beginning to name things. She knows all the words for the colours "red, blue, green, yellow etc", but if you hold up a coloured playbrick, she'll often get it wrong, because she hasn't learned to identify correctly what she is seeing. If you hold two different coloured bricks up, she knows they are different, but just can't identify why all of the time. She tends to get red right more than others, so she's beginning to understand what she is seeing is red.

Anyway, enough of my lab rat experiments I'm sure if we had the confidence to sit down with tones again and again, and test ourselves every day on them, your ability to identify them would increase dramatically, over a year. I'm just not sure if I'd want to spend $135 on someones method for it though.

And I agree with Kris that relative pitch is a much easier, and more instantly useful thing to develop. In fact its a requirement (and you are tested in exams on it) when studying a classical instrument.

/T
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PickNGrin
post Nov 29 2006, 06:41 PM
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I'd look into free info before I paid that kind of money. go to the library or look online further.

Now Indeed, we had to do "ear training" when I was a music major. We had tests and were were graded onour ability to call out intervals -as Kris mentioned-- by ear, we had to name a minor 3rd, from a 5th etc.

We had a kid with "perfect pitch" --he was born with it- a gift- He could name any key you played on the piano (and the octave) with his back turned from the other side of the room --with 100% accuracy. really something to see.
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BollyRotten
post Nov 30 2006, 11:51 AM
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I have a great little free program on interval training , heres the link,

http://www.download.com/Interval-Trainer-F...ml?tag=pdp_prod

It may help you train your ears for the intervals at least lol.


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RIP Dime
post Dec 1 2006, 03:36 AM
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QUOTE (BollyRotten @ Nov 30 2006, 11:51 AM) *
I have a great little free program on interval training , heres the link,

http://www.download.com/Interval-Trainer-F...ml?tag=pdp_prod

It may help you train your ears for the intervals at least lol.


Great link dude! biggrin.gif


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