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> Trying To Work Something Out
steve25
post Jan 9 2009, 05:03 PM
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Does anyone have any advice for trying to work something out that is being played as a chord? I have a few songs i'm trying to learn and they're all different styles and one is orchestral using my keyboard. The bit i'm stuck on is a kind of slow group string section. I can identify the first bit, the 2 violin sections plays an A not and a B note but i can't work out the next. I'm pretty sure it's major but i can't seem to work it out i can identify 1 note i think, that being a C# but i can't get past that
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David Wallimann
post Jan 9 2009, 05:10 PM
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Can you post a sample of the chord? I'd be happy to help you!


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Ramiro Delforte
post Jan 9 2009, 05:13 PM
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Well...that's ear training. You have to learn with a method you achive that kind of hearing. But you have the old "error and try" (I don't actually know the translation of that phrase in english, I think could be that).
It's simple.
If it's a triad you have 4 options: major, minor, augmented and diminished.
Also you can have added notes like 9, 11, 13.
And there are the sus chords like sus2 or sus4.
Pretty much there you have all the 3 note chords and the added notes.
If it's a four note chord then you have 5 common options: maj7, m7, m maj7, m7(b5) and °7.
Also for those chords you can have an added note 9,11,13.
I forgot to mention that the added notes could be flat or sharp. #9, #11, #13 and b9, b11, b13.
So you can record those chords and then put yourself a test and try to guess. (Start with the 3 note chord then get into the rest).


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David Wallimann
post Jan 9 2009, 05:40 PM
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Ramiro pointed you to the right direction.
Also, let me add a suggestion.
Memorize the main intervals in a way that you can recognize its sound right away.

Take a song you know very well and that you can sing on top of your head without thinking then find on your instrument which interval the first 2 notes are.
Eventually you'll develop a good relative pitch to recognize each intervals.

Write yourself a grid with each intervals and as you go, complete it with the first 2 notes of songs you kow.

For example:

Maj 2nd --> Happy Birthday (That tune starts with a Major 2nd)

Perfect 4th --> We wish you a Merry Christmas

Eventually you'll have a song assigned to all intervals. That will help!



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Pedja Simovic
post Jan 9 2009, 05:56 PM
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Hey Steve,

I think I gave you some exercises for singing and playing major scales via Guitar pro files.

Recognizing melodies and chords should be joined process. While you practice singing and identifying melodies (intervals), you should also listen to chord progressions or chords you recorded to determine what type they are at first.

Best way to start is record a tape with only Major and Minor chords and make it last for 3 minutes. Tomorrow record another new tape and so on. Every day you should do dictation using your types and try to identify chord sound from them. After you do the test , go trough the tape and check your answer by finding the chords on your guitar.


If you are looking to hear exact root of the chords and know keys, that will come with time and practice as relative pitch develops the more you practice intervals and chords.

Hope this was helpful Steve smile.gif


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steve25
post Jan 9 2009, 10:00 PM
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Hey guys thanks for the reply.

David: I sent you a link to it in PM its a free download perfectly legal

I've been looking into intervals today thanks to Andrew's tehory lessons and i've found an interval ear trainer online which was pretty good. So i loaded up the keyboard and indentified the notes and stuff and intervals and of course i wasn't the best but i did ok tongue.gif
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