Reply to this topicStart new topic
> oh and 1 more thing
Kevin98497
post Jan 3 2007, 07:54 PM
Post #1


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 670
Joined: 17-August 06
From: UK
Member No.: 810



i thought it was the loudness, but then a 2x12" amp can be 15 watt and then there is a tiny little amp but it has 50 watts?
so what does it actually do?watts?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rvddps
post Jan 4 2007, 07:49 PM
Post #2


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 133
Joined: 23-August 06
Member No.: 819



I honestly am not that sure, but i know that a solid sate amp will require more power to be louder, whereas a tube amp will require less wattage.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tank
post Jan 4 2007, 09:02 PM
Post #3


GMC Veteran
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 667
Joined: 20-August 05
From: Shropshire UK
Member No.: 5



As far as I am aware

The amp provides the power to drive the speakers. The way I understand it, how loud the sound will be will depend on
A: How much power is available
B: The resistance and output of the speakers

Therefore if you connect a 50 watt amp up to a set of speakers that are easy to "drive" you can get a louder sound than a 100 watt that is connected to a speaker that is harder to drive.

Loudness (measured in decibels) is a logarithmic scale, so you have to make some pretty big power jumps to get an increase in sound. It works something like this:

Sorry, the next bit uses exponential mathmatics
Say I have a 5 watt amplifier, but I want something twice as loud.
I'd need to do something like this,
2 ^(to the power of)1 times as loud, =
5 watts * 10^1 = 50 watts
So I need a 50 watt amplifier

So what if I wanted something 4 times as loud as a 50 watt amplifier
4 = 2^2 S0
50 watts * 10^2 = 5000Watts
So I'd need a 5 kilowatt amp to get 4 times as loud as a 50 watt amp, (8 times as loud as a 5 watt amp).


The way I see it, the only thing you'll wanting to worry about wattage for is how you like your distortion. If you've got a valve amp, and you want to drive the master volume up, to get some lovely creamy power overdrive, if you do it with a 50 watt amp, you'll be filling a reasonable sized venue with quite a bit of sound (I use a 50 watt Engl for most of my performances, which more than fills the room with the master set at 8, nice creamy thick sound, and certainly wouldn't be able to drive it that much in a rehearsal room, without deafening everyone). If I were to use a 100 watt amp, and tried to achieve the same volume, because theres extra power available, I'd maybe only have the amp set to 5, and it wouldn't be giving me the nice power overdrive. So the effective difference between a 50 and a 100 watt amp, is that they'll be able to produce the same effective volume, but the 100 watt will not distort, where as the 50 will.

I'd really like to know if my take on it is correct, as this is basically from knowing a little maths, and from experience on stage. I know that texasamp would probably be best to answer something like this.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Kevin98497
post Jan 21 2007, 08:24 PM
Post #4


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 670
Joined: 17-August 06
From: UK
Member No.: 810



QUOTE (Tank @ Jan 4 2007, 08:02 PM) *
As far as I am aware

The amp provides the power to drive the speakers. The way I understand it, how loud the sound will be will depend on
A: How much power is available
B: The resistance and output of the speakers

Therefore if you connect a 50 watt amp up to a set of speakers that are easy to "drive" you can get a louder sound than a 100 watt that is connected to a speaker that is harder to drive.

Loudness (measured in decibels) is a logarithmic scale, so you have to make some pretty big power jumps to get an increase in sound. It works something like this:

Sorry, the next bit uses exponential mathmatics
Say I have a 5 watt amplifier, but I want something twice as loud.
I'd need to do something like this,
2 ^(to the power of)1 times as loud, =
5 watts * 10^1 = 50 watts
So I need a 50 watt amplifier

So what if I wanted something 4 times as loud as a 50 watt amplifier
4 = 2^2 S0
50 watts * 10^2 = 5000Watts
So I'd need a 5 kilowatt amp to get 4 times as loud as a 50 watt amp, (8 times as loud as a 5 watt amp).
The way I see it, the only thing you'll wanting to worry about wattage for is how you like your distortion. If you've got a valve amp, and you want to drive the master volume up, to get some lovely creamy power overdrive, if you do it with a 50 watt amp, you'll be filling a reasonable sized venue with quite a bit of sound (I use a 50 watt Engl for most of my performances, which more than fills the room with the master set at 8, nice creamy thick sound, and certainly wouldn't be able to drive it that much in a rehearsal room, without deafening everyone). If I were to use a 100 watt amp, and tried to achieve the same volume, because theres extra power available, I'd maybe only have the amp set to 5, and it wouldn't be giving me the nice power overdrive. So the effective difference between a 50 and a 100 watt amp, is that they'll be able to produce the same effective volume, but the 100 watt will not distort, where as the 50 will.

I'd really like to know if my take on it is correct, as this is basically from knowing a little maths, and from experience on stage. I know that texasamp would probably be best to answer something like this.



oops didnt type anything in
thanks mate
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 28th May 2017 - 03:55 PM