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> REQ: Roadmap
MickeM
post Jan 9 2007, 10:57 AM
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Kristofer, I'm requesting some theory. An easy approach to the fretboard, there are other cources called fretboard physics and fretboard roadmaps as examples to what I mean.

I mean something like, instead of the box-approach which I think is somewhat umpractical, to learn the patterns for scales and modes instead as:

A-minor has notes of 1-3-4-6-8-9-11 (ABCDEFG)
and a pattern;

Starting on the 5'th fret on the E and A string the pattern looks like
A 5-7-8 (DEF) (notes 6-8-9)
E 5-7-8 (ABC) (notes 1-3-4)

and the same pattern is repeated on strings;
G 7-9-10 (DEF) (same as above 6-8-9)
D 7-9-10 (ABC) (same as above 1-3-4)

and then repeated, the same pattern, on strings B/G (with one steps adjustment on cool.gif and E/B

If you get what I mean?
But... instead of learning all patterns for all scales and modes, there must be a simpler way. Or? unsure.gif Would be great if you could teach it in that case.


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ezravdb
post Jan 9 2007, 11:58 AM
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You mean a formula? laugh.gif

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,(8) is major which means in C

C D E F G A B ©


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Norven
post Jan 9 2007, 06:59 PM
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My experience is that it´s MUCH easier to learn boxes. And when you know your boxes in the major scale its easy to learn new mods


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MickeM
post Jan 9 2007, 11:42 PM
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QUOTE (Norven @ Jan 9 2007, 06:59 PM) *
My experience is that it´s MUCH easier to learn boxes. And when you know your boxes in the major scale its easy to learn new mods


Well, I'm sure everybodys situation is different and we all experience things in our own ways. I started with boxes 16 years ago and they still make no sence in music theory. For me, now, they are rather a limitation to my technique than really helpful. Why? Because for me it's like these boxes set borders on the fretboard so when I improvise a solo inside one of these boxes and I want to move to another position it will surely be to inside another box, just because they feel comfortable, and from there I can move into the next box via the borde notes. But I always think "boxes" and it's not helping.
I'd rather relearn everything in a way so I see the fretboard without these borders between each box.

When I instead focus to see the patterns as described in my first post I can play that pattern - A B C D E F - on two strings all over the fretboard and find the positions in the blink of an eye. That's impossible when thinking "boxes" and in "boxes" i don't know what notes I'm playing. To me it's just no sence and a tremendous limitation and I need to get rid of that way of thinking and relearn another way that will open up the fretboard. For me that is. I'm sure boxes work well for others.


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Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 10 2007, 08:40 AM
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QUOTE
A-minor has notes of 1-3-4-6-8-9-11 (ABCDEFG)
and a pattern;


Hmm that's an interesting approach... are these the frets in between the notes?

Making such lessons would be to reinvent music theory - but why not? smile.gif


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MickeM
post Jan 10 2007, 10:41 AM
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QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ Jan 10 2007, 08:40 AM) *
Hmm that's an interesting approach... are these the frets in between the notes?

No, it's just lines to separate.

If every note gets a number, like this
A #B B C #D D E #F F #G G #A
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

The notes in a scale can be described as
A B C D E F G
1 3 4 6 8 9 11

And that was what I meant with the 1-3-4-6-8-9-11

I may confuse things... My main purpose is to get rid of the box thinking that I'm stuck with and instead I want to be able to find these 1-3-4-6-8-9-11 patterns by another way of thinking. Don't know how to archive that exactly but right now I'm concentrating on patterns.
For example, the notes 1-3-4-6-8-9 can be played as

E -------------------------------------------------------------------10-12-13-
B --------------------3-5-6-------------------------------10-12-13-----------
G -------------2-4-5-----------------------------7-9-10----------------------
D ------0-2-3----------------------------7-9-10------------------------------
A 0-2-3---------------------------5-7-8---------------------------------------
E ---------------------------5-7-8---------------------------------------------

Now knowing that A is the first note in this pattern (for the key of A) I will easily find the A all over the neck.

E ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------(A)-12-13-
B -------------------------(A)-5-6------------------------------------(A)-12-13-----------
G ----------------(A)-4-5-----------------------------------(A)-9-10----------------------
D --------(A)-2-3---------------------------------(A)-9-10------------------------------
A (A)-2-3---------------------------------(A)-7-8---------------------------------------
E ----------------------------------(A)-7-8---------------------------------------------

So now I could actually play something including this pattern on the B string and easily move to any other string to continue play the same thing or what's coming next in the solo or whatever and not get lost since the pattern on string B (10-12-13) is contained in one box and the pattern on string A (5-7-8) is in another.
Belive me when I say I'm so stuck in the box thinking I now wish I never learned it to start with. It has an enormous negative impact to my playing. I want to see an open fretboard without boxes and borders. Any ideas for courses you could come up with?

I know this sounds complicated and I hope I didn't confuse things even more.


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Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 10 2007, 11:24 AM
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QUOTE
No, it's just lines to separate.


Which must be the same as the frets I believe. It fits with your description.

However, I am afraid this will not help you get rid of the boxes - it will only help you get rid of the tonal system which is based on the major scale.

You have a good point - the old notation system based on the major scale is a nightmare on the guitar. ( The steps aren't logic - why do we have half step between b-c and e-f and not the rest?)

Unfortunately this is the most common way of seeing it + if you want to communicate with other instrumentalists that's the valid language...


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