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> REQ: Rhythm guitar
MickeM
post Jan 13 2007, 12:29 AM
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It's not all about soloing. Guys like Rhoads, Lynch, Jake E Lee, Page and many more did amazing rhythm patterns too - Yeah, I'm snowed in on 80's hardrock/metal and late 70's too for that matter laugh.gif

Can we be tought rhythm guitar, blues, rock, hard rock, heavy metal. Perhaps in that order.

Ok, some might say "Blues. That's not difficult!" - But it's all about how you do things, right? It's not all slow barré chords :-)


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Kevin98497
post Jan 14 2007, 12:44 AM
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Hendrix was a fantastic lead and rhythm guitarist
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TheNung89
post Jan 14 2007, 02:06 AM
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A lesson on Hendrix-style rhythm guitar would seriously be awesome.
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Steelkonsum
post Jan 16 2007, 10:59 AM
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I would like to second the 70-80s metal rythm part lessons.

Or just metal rythms overall. And other rythms for that matter. but metal rules. and you know it.


EDIT: just wanted to add, for even more persuasive force, that sometimes the backing track riffs are almost as interesting as the lead over in some of the lessons here. Might be 'cause I enjoy playing those rythms almost as much as the solos though biggrin.gif. Guess some of us find rythm possibly more interesting than solos rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by Stålkonsum: Jan 16 2007, 11:47 AM
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Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 16 2007, 07:11 PM
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We definately need some rhythm guitar here - we don't have enough...


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theozard
post Jan 22 2007, 11:39 PM
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ya rythm lessons will be wonderfull...just that please make sure they can be played on the acoustic too wink.gif
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VinceG
post Jan 26 2007, 12:16 PM
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yea, in my perspective rhythm guitar in metal is as good as lead. Look at Exodus for exampe mainly on the rythm part for deathamphetamine, that thrash riff is actually better than the solo for the song. The thing about that song is that the riff is used as any other thrash riffs, using low E in different picking style, it just fascinates me and i could never do that, so yes metal rhythm would be a huge plus if you guys put up videos.


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Guitar1969
post Feb 6 2007, 09:44 PM
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QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ Jan 16 2007, 10:11 AM) *
We definately need some rhythm guitar here - we don't have enough...


I would also want it to cover some more funky rhythm stylings too, just so I'm well versed. I can't seem to get that funky strumming sound in my playing and not sure where to go for help.

This post has been edited by Guitar1969: Feb 6 2007, 09:46 PM


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chainsbroken
post Feb 6 2007, 10:03 PM
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Rhythm would be awesome in all the styles mentioned above. look foward to that!!!!!!


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Ikaros
post Feb 7 2007, 02:33 AM
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I need to know the logic to figuring out good chords to use for a given key - say A for example. Do you just use the circle of fifths? But even so, it can be more than I-IV-V chords combined with a few riffs right? How do you know what extra chords work? Maybe I mean not just a standard progression throughout the total song, but using multiple chords in a single measure or two for a riff like effect.


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Guitar1969
post Feb 7 2007, 03:21 AM
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QUOTE (Ikaros @ Feb 6 2007, 05:33 PM) *
I need to know the logic to figuring out good chords to use for a given key - say A for example. Do you just use the circle of fifths? But even so, it can be more than I-IV-V chords combined with a few riffs right? How do you know what extra chords work? Maybe I mean not just a standard progression throughout the total song, but using multiple chords in a single measure or two for a riff like effect.

All the 7 chords in a given key will fit and sound okay, but certain chords fit better than others in a certain musical situation(Such as I IV V in rock).


The best thing to do is figure what chords are available in the key you want to work in and then try them out.

such as for Amaj scale, its:

A Bm C#m D# F Gm G#dim

Remember you can use individual notes from the chords too to spice it up(Which really goes back to our scales)


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Ikaros
post Feb 7 2007, 03:34 AM
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So you are saying that for example,with the A minor pentonic scale you can use chords that have roots that are the notes used in the scale to create a chord-riff pattern?


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Guitar1969
post Feb 7 2007, 08:53 PM
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QUOTE (Ikaros @ Feb 6 2007, 06:34 PM) *
So you are saying that for example,with the A minor pentonic scale you can use chords that have roots that are the notes used in the scale to create a chord-riff pattern?


Simply Speaking - Yes

The Am Pentatonic scale(root of Am) is the relative minor(6th note of the C Major Scale) of the C major scale (The pentatonic just has 2 of the notes removed - Penta meaning 5 notes)

So if you look at the chords that fit into the C maj scale(Or Am scale for that matter- they are the same chords, just in a different order), you get the chords of:

tonic II III IV V VI VII
Cmaj Dm Em Fmag Gmaj Am Bdim

Do you see the Am in the sixth position(known as 6th degree) - thats the minor pentatonic for this particular scale.

All of the chords above will work with the Am pentatonic scale, although some will sound better than others , as when doing a chord progression some of the chords sound better together for certain styles ( I IV V for rock for example) .


So to create a chord-riff pattern you can mix the chords from the scale along with the individual notes of the Am pentatonic.

Hope this helps


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radarlove1984
post Feb 7 2007, 09:11 PM
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Best explanation I've heard. Thanks for posting.
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Ikaros
post Feb 7 2007, 10:20 PM
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Thank you. That clarifies for me what I was trying to guess at!


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Zee Deveel
post Feb 7 2007, 10:24 PM
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QUOTE (Guitar1969 @ Feb 7 2007, 07:53 PM) *
So to create a chord-riff pattern you can mix the chords from the scale along with the individual notes of the Am pentatonic.

Which is the Aeolian mode in the key of Am excluding the 4th (D) and the 7th (G#).


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