Reply to this topicStart new topic
> How To Find The Chords With A Melody Line
playaxeman
post Feb 23 2009, 05:57 PM
Post #1


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.434
Joined: 16-October 08
From: The Netherlands
Member No.: 6.091



Hi GMC

I have tabed some melody line in GP. Or sometimes i hear a nice melody

The point is I don't know how to relate these melody lines to chords to have a complete song.

Are there somekind of methods to make the chord from a melody line?



--------------------
Gear:

Guitars
Music Man Luke BFR , Music Man JP LTD 2008, Paul Reed Smith Santana III, Gibson Les Paul, Ovation Adamas, Ovation Ultra

Amps
Hughes & Kettner Switchblade 50 combo

Effects
Korg Pandora PX5D, Line 6 Pod XT Live

Recording
Guitar Rig 5, Logitech QuickCam Pro 9000, Magix MusicMaker2008

Visit My Website


Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Matt23
post Feb 23 2009, 06:01 PM
Post #2


Accomplished Tone Master
Group Icon

Group: GMC Wiki:er
Posts: 1.745
Joined: 17-January 08
From: Scotland
Member No.: 3.866



Well first you need to choose where you want your chord changes. Then you need to see what chords contains most notes from that part of the melody. Of course sometimes it sounds better to use a chrod that doesn't fit in with the melody perfectly so you should experiment with different chords.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
seagull
post Feb 23 2009, 06:12 PM
Post #3


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 360
Joined: 12-April 07
From: Denmark
Member No.: 1.546



Sometimes finding a bass note that creates the sound you want to go along with the seperate notes can help. And then it also becomes easier to find full chords and scales. smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
playaxeman
post Feb 23 2009, 06:55 PM
Post #4


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.434
Joined: 16-October 08
From: The Netherlands
Member No.: 6.091



QUOTE (seagull @ Feb 23 2009, 06:12 PM) *
Sometimes finding a bass note that creates the sound you want to go along with the seperate notes can help. And then it also becomes easier to find full chords and scales. smile.gif


Ok good tip Thanks

QUOTE (Matt23 @ Feb 23 2009, 06:01 PM) *
Well first you need to choose where you want your chord changes. Then you need to see what chords contains most notes from that part of the melody. Of course sometimes it sounds better to use a chrod that doesn't fit in with the melody perfectly so you should experiment with different chords.


He
Thx for the reply.


Isn't the melody leading in when a chord has to change?



--------------------
Gear:

Guitars
Music Man Luke BFR , Music Man JP LTD 2008, Paul Reed Smith Santana III, Gibson Les Paul, Ovation Adamas, Ovation Ultra

Amps
Hughes & Kettner Switchblade 50 combo

Effects
Korg Pandora PX5D, Line 6 Pod XT Live

Recording
Guitar Rig 5, Logitech QuickCam Pro 9000, Magix MusicMaker2008

Visit My Website


Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ivan Milenkovic
post Feb 23 2009, 09:29 PM
Post #5


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 25.396
Joined: 20-November 07
From: Belgrade, Serbia
Member No.: 3.341



Every note can represent a chord, you just have to find out in what key you are in, analyze your melody, and find out what chords can be played. If the melody is good you can put 2 chords, or a whole symphonic orchestra bellow it. It's up to you to make the chord changes on those places you feel you need them to be. Try to put chords that contain the melody note, so they get along nicely.


--------------------
- Ivan's Video Chat Lesson Notes HERE
- Check out my GMC Profile and Lessons
- (Please subscribe to my) YouTube Official Channel
- Let's be connected through ! Facebook! :)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ramiro Delforte
post Feb 23 2009, 10:18 PM
Post #6


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 2.279
Joined: 4-August 08
From: Argentina, Buenos Aires
Member No.: 5.625



I think a cool way to see this happening is to listen to jazz standards because they have originally a melody and a certain chord changes but every time a great player take the standard it becomes really different, they re-harmonize all the tune with the same melody.
There is a great clinic about this made by Andy Laverne lunched by Homespun.

Also you'll need some ear training to be fully aware of this kind of hearing. You must be able to hear the chord changes throughout the melody.
Try to start with simple things like "Oh Susana!", "Happy birthday" or tunes like these, you know what I mean. Once you've mastered simple changes you can pass to the next level and try to hear the chords behind "Stand by me" for example that isn't complex but harmonically is more complex than the Happy Birthday tune. And then move on to some advanced hearing of modern jazz tunes or classical music where you have to listen to the modulations.


--------------------
Check out my Instructor Profile and Board

LIVE VIDEO CHATS EVERY MONDAY AROUND 22PM (GMC HOUR)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Vasilije Vukmiro...
post Feb 24 2009, 05:57 PM
Post #7


Jazz Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 2.691
Joined: 1-October 08
From: Belgrade
Member No.: 6.012



You must know standard harmonic shapes, I-IV-V, II-V-I, I-VI-II-V...
Learning jazz standards is tremendous help, as Ramiro put it...
Every melody you write is likely to fit in the one harmony category.
Chord/melody playing is really difficult stuff. I recorded one tune with lots of block chords, see how it looks like.
link


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd January 2017 - 05:33 PM