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> Way new newbie
Scott Gentzen
post Jan 19 2007, 12:03 AM
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I even posted my first post elsewhere instead of here. Oops.

I'm 32 years old and the first time I picked up a guitar and decided I should really learn how to play it was just short of a month ago.

In high school, I listened to a lot of guitar rock...Steve Vai, Metallica, Anthrax, Testament, Extreme, etc (it was the 80's). A friend tried to teach me how to play but all I learned is that I had a really short reach and that it all made my hands hurt, so I stopped.

Late in 2006, a band that I'm into these days, Otto's Daughter (http://www.ottosdaughter.com), did a special pre-order thing for their new album that's coming out. If you preorder, you get the CD signed, poster, stickers, etc and you get entered to win a guitar. I like signed stuff, so I preordered and in mid-December I found out that I won the guitar.

So now I have a guitar that I can either let sit and collect dust, or learn to play. I'm going to learn to play it. Got a pawnshop amp to run it through as of last week. I'm working on getting a regular structured practice routine now...the How to Practice video isn't so good for me yet as the jam/improv section is really beyond my skillset yet. I'm thinking of something like 1/3 raw technique, 1/3 scales and chords, 1/3 working out playing a song.

Short term, I'm working hard on getting used to the mechanics of playing...hand positions, posture, toughening up my fingertips, flexibility, etc. Short term goals are the obvious learning a vocabulary of scales and cords and being able to play them fluidly. Longer term, I'm thinking that I'd like to be able to hang in a blues jam situation...not necessarily tear it up but be able to follow along and hold my own at least. From there, who knows? There's a lot of time between now and then.


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Guitars: ESP Semi-Hollow Eclipse, 1984 Ibanez Roadstar RS440, Peavey T-60, Daisy Rock Rock Candy Custom
Amps: Peavey Transformer 112, Epiphone Valve Jr head with custom 2x12 cab
Pedals: Boss TU-2, Budda Bud-Wah, Chuck Collins Harmonic Percolator clone
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raqroso
post Jan 19 2007, 08:56 AM
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Dude -

You won that guitar. It's a sign. You seem very grounded in your goals.

THings I wish someone had told me:

When learning a new lick play it as slow as you have to in order to play it perfect, over and over and then
build up speed. Muscle memory records mistakes too

Alternate pick - always

When you first 'think' you can play a scale as a beginner you are nowhere near being able to really play the scale... keep practicing it. Then practice some more., Then watch Kris or Pavel.. Then sulk. Then practice some more.

Learn the C-A-G-E-D system - there is no easier way to familiarize with the fretboard ...

First things to study/practice/learn:
Chords: C- A- G - E - D - Am - Dm -Em

Moveable A Bar Chord shape
Moveable E Bar Chord Shaps

The 5 Pentatonic Scale Patterns - (they are all over this site)

Lean all the notes on the 6 and 5 strings (once you know the 6 string you also know the 1 - that's 1/2 the guitar! THe rest is easy!)

Practice the solos and lessons found here they are the best

Divorce shapes from sound. Don't just play shapes / select notes for their musical value not shape value

Now that you play people will ask you to play for them. Build a repotoire. Learn some simple pieces first then Learn songs and solos. Learn them start to finish so you can perform for people when asked. But when you do ..Never play beyond your abilty in front of others, play parts of things or noodle around in front of a lot of people. Pick up. Play your piece perfectly. Stop playing.
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moorkop
post Jan 20 2007, 01:06 AM
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I'd say as an advice, don't focus too much on hard practicing, but keep it fun
Learning the right technique is easier if you keep yourself motivated, so choose a technique and a song you heard it from, then you'll be able to do both
And try to find a teacher for a while (that works the best)

And what is the C A G E D system exactly huh.gif ?


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gear
guitar: ibanez SA 260 FM
amp: hughes & ketler blue edition 60 wts (in garage)
amp you hear: crappy yahama borrowed from friend
effects: dunlop jimi hendrix wahwah
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radarlove1984
post Jan 20 2007, 05:06 AM
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There's one more piece of advice I don't think you've heard yet...

You WILL suck for the first few weeks (probably the first month) of playing the guitar. Don't worry, so does everyone else. There's a lot of coordination and muscle memory you need to develop. Most people can't rub their stomach and pat their head at the same time. Now imaging doing that while your left foot taps quarter notes and your right foot taps 16th notes and you're singing at the same time.

It's pretty tricky. It's also easy to learn, but it will take a while. If you can make peace with the fact that you won't sound like Steve Vai in your first month of practice, you'll be just fine.

Also, at least in my case, muscle memory could literally develop over night. Just yesterday I couldn't play one of the riffs on this site, and today I nailed it within 10 minutes of warming up. As long as you force yourself to practice for the first month - even for 30 minutes a day - you'll wake up one morning and find that you've got all the basics down.

When you get to that point, you'll have a lot of fun.
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Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 22 2007, 04:07 PM
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Welcome Scott! biggrin.gif

That's some great advice you got! smile.gif


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Scott Gentzen
post Jan 23 2007, 03:35 AM
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QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ Jan 22 2007, 03:07 PM) *
Welcome Scott! biggrin.gif

That's some great advice you got! smile.gif


Thanks.

No kidding on the advice. Wow. I had the CAGED stuff bookmarked somewhere but forgot it so that was a good reminder. Good to know that it's my duty to learn how to play this thing. biggrin.gif

Still having a little trouble getting together a good practice routine. It's one thing to say I'm going to practice hammer-ons and pull-offs for 20 minutes, then scales or chords for 20 minutes then work on a song for 20 minutes. It's another thing entirely to do it.


--------------------
Guitars: ESP Semi-Hollow Eclipse, 1984 Ibanez Roadstar RS440, Peavey T-60, Daisy Rock Rock Candy Custom
Amps: Peavey Transformer 112, Epiphone Valve Jr head with custom 2x12 cab
Pedals: Boss TU-2, Budda Bud-Wah, Chuck Collins Harmonic Percolator clone
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raqroso
post Jan 24 2007, 09:49 AM
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CAGED Is a way of organizing the fretboard- it's all over the internet...

I don't want to scare anyone away but I'll try a simple explanation:

The 5 Chord shapes: C A G E D connect on the fretboard (in that order)..... so if you play C in the open position you know that you can find another C chord in the shape of an A a few frets down the neck ... ... and after the A shape is another C chord in the shape of a G etc.. then more notes that make up a 'C' chord can be found in the shape of an E and then more in the shape of a D...

The real beauty is this:
Every one of the 5 chord shapes corresponds to one of the 5 Pentatatonic scale patterns...
and for every pentatonic pattern there is a corresponding major scale pattern ...
which correspond to the modes ..

The 5 shapes/ pent patterns each have an apreggio associated (the same ones Pavel was playing)
The 5 shapes are also Inversions - becaues you are learning to play one chord 5 ways

Arpeggios, Inversions, Pentatonics, Major scale, modes ... all in one place, for me it was like turning on a light.
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