Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Rythm guitarist
theozard
post Jan 22 2007, 11:37 PM
Post #1


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 15
Joined: 22-January 07
Member No.: 1.102



I have been playing from a year and a half now. Although i have not been playing with the metronome but it sounds to be im pretty on track when it comes to playing general strumming etc...i can also play the Amin pentatonic and the Cmajor scale etc. Thats it i guess
I want to become a rythm guitarist and want to perfect my skills..now i was wondering
-What all does a rythm guitarist consist of?(what all should he know)
-From my description..how do i youll think i should take it from here

Thanks smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Steelkonsum
post Jan 23 2007, 12:04 AM
Post #2


Member
*

Group: Members
Posts: 246
Joined: 11-January 07
From: Malmo, Sweden
Member No.: 1.066



QUOTE (theozard @ Jan 22 2007, 11:37 PM) *
I have been playing from a year and a half now. Although i have not been playing with the metronome but it sounds to be im pretty on track when it comes to playing general strumming etc...i can also play the Amin pentatonic and the Cmajor scale etc. Thats it i guess
I want to become a rythm guitarist and want to perfect my skills..now i was wondering
-What all does a rythm guitarist consist of?(what all should he know)
-From my description..how do i youll think i should take it from here

Thanks smile.gif


I would guess you need to learn as many chord shapes as humanly possible to be able to create some interesting variations. And of course learn different rythms(such as gallop, funk style, etc etc). Practice the backing tracks on each lesson, theyre generally very cool.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
radarlove1984
post Jan 23 2007, 09:27 AM
Post #3


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 170
Joined: 19-January 07
Member No.: 1.092



What kind of rhythm style do you mainly want to play?

There's a huge difference between playing Bob Dylan and Metallica. If you like a specific genre, you should start there first.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
theozard
post Jan 23 2007, 12:45 PM
Post #4


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 15
Joined: 22-January 07
Member No.: 1.102



I really like metallica but i would really like playing things like RHCP, STP and other stuff on similar lines..so what should i start with/do now? smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Zee Deveel
post Jan 24 2007, 10:35 PM
Post #5


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 165
Joined: 17-January 07
Member No.: 1.088



The key to playing rhythm for me is to listen to music really carefully. Make sure when you learn a piece of rhythm guitar you don't just play the same notes at the same speed, but listen to it over and over until you get the strumming pattern exact and it sounds perfect. The Rammstein - Du Hast lesson on freelicks.net is a good example of this.


--------------------
Guitars - Epiphone Les Paul Custom (Seymour Duncan JB), Schecter Omen 6 Extreme FR, Squier Affinity Strat, Yamaha F-301 Acoustic

Pedals - Line 6 Uber Metal, Line 6 Echo Park, Jim Dunlop GCB95 Cry Baby, MXR Phase 90, Boss NS-2, Digitech WH-4, Boss TR-2, Boss TU-2, Behringer 7 Band EQ

Amps - Marshall AV50 Head + Cab, Marshall AVT100 112, Line 6 Spider 112, Fender Frontman
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MickeM
post Jan 24 2007, 11:59 PM
Post #6


Born of NWOBHM, Moderation Team Leader
*

Group: Members
Posts: 8.562
Joined: 9-January 07
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Member No.: 1.062



I don't know what RHCP and STP is so I will answer in my own way just disregarding what you really want to play. rolleyes.gif

A good rhythm section starts with the bass and drums working together, so so very important that they are tight and playing the same things. I belive us guitarists tend to think it's just to drum away and the guy on the bass could be any random guy just poking around as he wishes.
Wrong! When the base player is away 50% of the energy is gone. When the base player and the drummer don't cope, same thing.
An example of playing the same things, listen to Ozzy - Mr Crowley. The part right after the lyrics going "Mr Crowley...." where ther guitar, bass and drums all do the same think for maximum effect.

Guitar: A F Dm
Bass: A F D
Drums: Crash Crash Crash
BdrumBdrumBdrum

Imagine how empty it would sound if either was missing. Or if the bass was galloping instead of following the same markings as the drums. Now so fantastic I think...

Then, when it comes ro rhythm guitar it could be about just strumming power chords, or adding some color like in Cream - Crossroads... these are the things I find difficult to come up with. Cream btw made some songs that are simple but genious if you listen to all the details. Sunshine of your love, White Room, Crowwroahs (it's amazing what one can do with just three chords), Strange brew (listen to the simple rhythm guitar and the solo gtr making fills)

So working a bit on coloring the rhythm with some runs instead of just playing pure chords gives life to a song. The difficult part (i think) is to come up with new ideas... sometimes it seems all good songs are already written. tongue.gif
This kind of rhythm is done in all genres, Jazz, Blues, Metal.
So listen to different kinds (use a good pair of headphones to grasp ALL the details)

One more thing would be to add fills. There's nothing nicer than a good 80's heavy metal fill biggrin.gif
Really makes playing the rhythm guitar more fun and good to know... don't let the solo guitarist have all the fun wink.gif

Something I have neglected before but what's really useful is to master the volume knob of the guitar, learn how to adjust the volume with your pinkey, it's a good way to go from clean to distortion for different sections in a song. Obviously not for people with Les Pauls if they don't have really really long pinkeys biggrin.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
theozard
post Jan 26 2007, 12:08 AM
Post #7


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 15
Joined: 22-January 07
Member No.: 1.102



Firstly, im on an acoustic man and RHCP= red hot chili peppers and stp=stone temple pilots biggrin.gif
Really great tips there but like i said i have an acoustic so i think i cant do most of the stuff you mentioned...any tips for an acoustic? smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
radarlove1984
post Jan 26 2007, 01:51 AM
Post #8


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 170
Joined: 19-January 07
Member No.: 1.092



I'm not very familiar with the bands you mentioned, but I know you could benefit from learning ALL of the barre chords.

Most guitarists I know stop learning barre chords after they have the Emaj/Emin shape and the Amaj/Amin shape in muscle memory.

You can also play barre chords in the Cmaj, Dmaj/Dmin, and Gmaj shapes.


As a rhythm guitarist, knowing how to play every chord 4 or 5 ways will give you a lot of freedom.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Steelkonsum
post Jan 26 2007, 01:57 AM
Post #9


Member
*

Group: Members
Posts: 246
Joined: 11-January 07
From: Malmo, Sweden
Member No.: 1.066



QUOTE (theozard @ Jan 26 2007, 12:08 AM) *
Firstly, im on an acoustic man and RHCP= red hot chili peppers and stp=stone temple pilots biggrin.gif
Really great tips there but like i said i have an acoustic so i think i cant do most of the stuff you mentioned...any tips for an acoustic? smile.gif



One of the most common and best tips in how to learn to play a certain style is to learn riffs/songs from the genre and listen to alot of the music, and i mean listen not just have it in the background.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 23rd July 2017 - 05:49 AM