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> Someone Studied Audio Engineer Or Something Similiar?
Skalde
post Mar 25 2009, 11:19 PM
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Hi,

I am going to leave school soon. So it's time to think about my future. To be responsible for the technic and mixing on a concert is a job I could imagine to do someday.
Studying audio audio engineering would be great, but I wonder if I can match the requremients for students, since there is a lot math and physics involved.
I appreciate any comment of people who have studied / are studying audio engineering. Is it doable? I am not a complete dumb in science, but I do not really like it. Perhaps a normal apprenticeship instead of university is better for me, as I prefer the practical work. If here are people who do these work for a living I want to ask them how they got this job and who is it really like

best regards,
Skalde
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Ivan Milenkovic
post Mar 25 2009, 11:38 PM
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I didn't go to any sound engineering school, but I can tell you how the situation here in my country is with in that line of work and tell you some experiences that I've hear from another people. Here, it is pretty hard to get signed up for the slot in sound engineer school/uni, cause there are some rigorous testings, involving several very complex tests and some projects as well. Some background is needed before applying. With that kind of diploma you can easily get a job in a major recording studio and start working as apprentice. This means you will learn from the experts right away. But even without it, you can start of as a freelancer and get a job in some minor recording studio and work your way up. Becoming and expert takes years of studying and hard work, so I think attending a school is very important but not crucial. You will learn enough from (the abundance) of literature and also a lot from working in a studio. If you work hard you can become an expert without a school as well.



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Pedja Simovic
post Mar 25 2009, 11:47 PM
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I have a very good friend who graduated from Berklee in Music production and engineering very successfully. I can talk to him and connect him with you perhaps - if you are interested.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Mar 25 2009, 11:55 PM
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I've studied a carrer that in Argentina is called "Audiovision Licenciature" which has two orientations: "Sound and Recording Technicature" & "Audio & Video Postproduction". As Ivan described that happens in his country, we have the same problem here... the admission test is very difficult and there are only 80 student allowed every year to star the carrer. This is because it isn't a private University.

My experience is really good (I did both orientations), I learnt a lot of basic concepts that I'm not sure that I was going to learn just working at studios. The math and physics are a bit difficult and tedious (you don't use it to much in the real work) but it isn't imposible to learn.
However you also MUST work, practice and study by your own (from books, websites, bands and other more experienced engineers) too because in this type of carrers it's more important your experience than the diploma.

So my recomendation is: go to the University. Offer your free help in different studios to learn more things there. Try to have some equipment to experiment by yourself (You can do it just with a cheap computer and a cheap mic and any soft).


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Bogdan Radovic
post Mar 26 2009, 12:08 AM
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I would recommend applying for the school !!! It will open you so many doors.You shouldn't feel so intimidated with math and physics because I don't think that will be their main subject there (and it shouldn't be on such an impossible level like on Math university or something).I do think its doable for you. As guys suggested , try to be apprentice in studios (where ever you get the chance) and you will learn a lot extra. But doing just that won't secure you a future (without diploma). Aim high and go for the school and see what happens. Also if you want mixing experiance you can go to local clubs and offer you "help" there with mixing live bands etc.


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Marc_Maiden
post Mar 26 2009, 12:26 AM
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you dont have to be great at math and physics, thats why you go to school, they will tech you all you will know,


its all about motivation and hardwork...just like guitar

i know that MI (music institute in hollywood california) lets you apply like you are applying to a university
thats a great school, and they have great programs such as guitar building, Music business, and of course audio engineering (aside from the normal guitar/bass/vocal/keybaord/percussion preforming programs)

im actually considering droping my BA major and going to that school for music,

music is where i am, and i am learning the hard way that i am no business man!


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Andrew6
post Mar 26 2009, 12:38 AM
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QUOTE (Marc_Maiden @ Mar 25 2009, 08:26 PM) *
you dont have to be great at math and physics, thats why you go to school, they will tech you all you will know,


its all about motivation and hardwork...just like guitar

i know that MI (music institute in hollywood california) lets you apply like you are applying to a university
thats a great school, and they have great programs such as guitar building, Music business, and of course audio engineering (aside from the normal guitar/bass/vocal/keybaord/percussion preforming programs)

im actually considering droping my BA major and going to that school for music,

music is where i am, and i am learning the hard way that i am no business man!

Yeah I graduate from computer science in about a month, I have a job lined up and everything but I am dreading it!I really wish I had of taken music or even Audio Engineering as there are courses available in my area sad.gif


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Marcus Lavendell
post Mar 26 2009, 07:46 AM
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I went to sound engineering school, and it’s probably the best thing I’ve done in my life. I’ve also worked at studios and radio stations, but they didn’t really seem to care too much about the education (!). They were more interested in how the recordings/mixing, etc. actually sounds.

If you’re a good sound engineer you’ll get a job, no matter if you’ve learned the stuff as an apprentice or at a university. At least this is how I think it works in Sweden. Maybe it’s different in other countries.


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